Goodbye 1Password? 5 Alternative Free Password Managers to Check Out
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Password managers are not only convenient but also help in protecting you online. But you need to use the right manager as well. Try these new free password managers, each with its own strengths.

For a long time, 1Password had been a great choice Let 1Password for Mac Manage Your Passwords & Secure Data Let 1Password for Mac Manage Your Passwords & Secure Data Despite the new iCloud Keychain feature in OS X Mavericks, I still prefer the power of managing my passwords in AgileBits's classic and popular 1Password, now in its 4th version. Read More  since it saved passwords on local storage. But recently, the company announced it will be storing passwords on a remote server as well — something that set it apart from others like LastPass. This change hasn’t gone down well with many fans, and users are looking for alternatives.

The good news is that you can still stay safe online and get all the benefits of a password manager How Password Managers Keep Your Passwords Safe How Password Managers Keep Your Passwords Safe Passwords that are hard to crack are also hard to remember. Want to be safe? You need a password manager. Here's how they work and how they keep you safe. Read More , without paying a dime. Try these free password managers.

1. Buttercup: Locally Stored Passwords

If you are considering a switch from 1Password because it will store passwords remotely, try out Buttercup. This free password manager only stores your passwords locally, without uploading them anywhere.

Buttercup screenshot

You do have the option to upload your passwords to your own cloud service, including Google Drive or Dropbox. But as a safety measure, it’s best not to.

There are dedicated apps for Windows, macOS, and Linux, along with browser extensions for Chrome and Firefox. Plus it has Android and iOS apps too, covering all major platforms. Buttercup is easy and comes with 256-bit encryption.

The only issue with this app is that I couldn’t get two-factor authentication What Is Two-Factor Authentication, And Why You Should Use It What Is Two-Factor Authentication, And Why You Should Use It Two-factor authentication (2FA) is a security method that requires two different ways of proving your identity. It is commonly used in everyday life. For example paying with a credit card not only requires the card,... Read More to work. There is a slot to enter a PIN, but it didn’t work out when I tried.

2. Myki: Fingerprint or Face ID as Master Password

Smartphones today use your fingerprint to determine that it’s you, and only then unlock. Why shouldn’t your password manager do the same? Myki works with fingerprints, Face ID, as well as four-digit PIN codes.

Myki screenshot

Like Buttercup, this is another free password manager that stores all your passwords offline. To sync across devices, it uses an encrypted P2P (peer-to-peer) connection. So your data is never in the cloud, it’s only passing between two devices that you control.

Myki also works perfectly with two-factor authentication. And although it’s a mobile-only app, it pairs with your computer for case-by-case logins. There’s also a simple feature to share your passwords without revealing them How to Safely Share Passwords With Friends and Family How to Safely Share Passwords With Friends and Family You should never share your passwords. But you do, don't you? That's why we're going to show you how to share your passwords while keeping your accounts as secure as possible. Read More , which can be handy for things like Netflix.

3. LessPass: Nothing Stored, It “Calculates” Passwords Each Time

LessPass has a completely different take on password management. All you have to do is create an account with a unique, strong, secure “master password” that you remember. After that, LessPass will take over.

LessPass in action GIF

Start LessPass when you sign up for a site (or when you change the password if you already have an account). Based on your master password, LessPass will create a new password for that site, applying its own calculations. This password will not be stored anywhere! The next time you want to log into the site, LessPass can re-calculate the password.

This way, your passwords aren’t stored anywhere, which means they can’t be part of a password leak Password Leaks Are Happening Now: Here's How to Protect Yourself Password Leaks Are Happening Now: Here's How to Protect Yourself Password leaks happen all the time, and there's a chance one of your accounts will be involved, if it hasn't happened already. So what can you do to keep your accounts safe? Read More . LessPass keeps you secure without you ever needing to worry about someone accessing your passwords.

4. Padlock: Minimalist, Easy, Free Password Manager

In case you haven’t used a password manager before, start with Padlock. This minimalist app is more about being easy to use than anything else.

The interface of Padlock is what sets it apart from the rest. It’s almost foolproof and much easier than to start with than popular managers like LastPass 8 Easy Ways to Supercharge Your LastPass Security 8 Easy Ways to Supercharge Your LastPass Security You might be using LastPass to manage your many online passwords, but are you using it right? Here are eight steps you can take to make your LastPass account even more secure. Read More . It also works on all major platforms, so you will be able to use it on any device.

Unfortunately, like 1Password, you’ll need to upload your data online with Padlock Cloud to sync your passwords. This isn’t the most secure way of protecting your passwords, but thankfully, you can turn it off too.

5. Remembear: Free and Easy, Plus Fingerprint Support

Fingerprint recognition is a wonderful security feature and easier than having a master password. Remembear, made by VPN company TunnelBear TunnelBear: The Easiest VPN For Protecting Your Privacy TunnelBear: The Easiest VPN For Protecting Your Privacy TunnelBear aims to simplify the VPN, making it useful for everyone. Its commitment to protecting your privacy online makes it a great provider. Read More , uses this to make password management easy.

Remembear screenshot

As long as your laptop or smartphone supports fingerprint ID, Remembear will work. You can ask it to remember your online accounts as well as important information like credit cards. The mobile app even comes with a built-in browser, but you needn’t use that. Remembear’s floating icon will show up in any browser you are using.

A privacy-focused company like TunnelBear making a free password manager that syncs across devices is a rare combination of factors. The app might end up being paid in the future, so grab it while it’s free!

Are You Sticking With 1Password?

With 1Password moving your saved data to the cloud, several fans are thinking of changing from this old stalwart. After all, what’s the point of a password manager if you aren’t sure of its security?

Will you change from 1Password? Do you think storing passwords in the cloud is a bad idea? Which password manager do you think is the most secure?

Image Credit: ARTIST/Depositphotos

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  1. Rich
    February 2, 2018 at 2:31 pm

    Thanks for sharing. I just found another free password manager on Cnet, which can also be an alternative. It is Cyclonis Password Manager. It is with powerful features and completely free of charge. No pop-ups ask me to upgrade to the paid one.
    http://download.cnet.com/Cyclonis-Password-Manager/3000-18501_4-77722594.html

  2. Hamish Ross
    December 16, 2017 at 6:02 am

    This article is so full of errors. Very poor for MUO. And no mention of KeePass.

  3. Perkin Warbeck
    December 14, 2017 at 8:40 pm

    Just fyi, Buttercup stores your data in the cloud. Lousy reporting. I'd call it fake news, but....

  4. Sky Trydo
    December 13, 2017 at 9:24 pm

    All i need to do is make up pass wors for google playstoe an gmail i can not handle reading any more pease can set it up so i can just do that plei have more that just one pass word but all i need now is to make one up thank you

  5. Bill de Haan
    December 13, 2017 at 8:11 pm

    I have been using Keepass (https://keepass.info/) for years. More than a decade, probably.

    In addition to being open source, it's portable, local, and works on numerous platforms (PC, Mac, Linux, Android, IOS, even Windows Phone).

    One of the nicest things I like about it is that you can have as many password databases as you like. So although I have a password database on my phone, it doesn't contain any of my financial accounts. Those are kept in a different database, which only resides on my home computer. Even if someone were to (a) steal my phone, and (b) crack my phone security, and (c) crack the Keepass password database as well, I wouldn't have any financial exposure.

    No dig at 1password, but if people *are* looking for a replacement, I'd recommend Keepass without reservation. Free, open source, and multiplatform.

  6. Kate
    December 13, 2017 at 7:14 am

    Full disclosure: I work for AgileBits, the maker of 1Password.

    While we understand a hosted solution isn’t for everyone, if you are under the impression that our offering 1Password memberships means you are required to move your data to the cloud to use 1Password, that’s absolutely not the case. When you install 1Password, you're offered a choice as to how to sync and store your data. You can create a standalone vault and choose your own sync method (WLAN, Dropbox, iCloud, or none at all), or sign up for a 1Password membership and sync via our secure servers. No matter which option you choose, your data is always encrypted end-to-end and stays where you put it. No one is moving your data anywhere (except you — you can move it wherever you’d like, including out of 1Password if you’re so inclined) and the choice of how to sync and store your data is yours and yours alone.

    Of course, there are tons of great reasons to choose a 1Password membership. Your memberships includes everything folks have loved about 1Password for over a decade (A+ security, 24/7 support, those same 1Password apps you already love), plus automatic syncing, secure and simple sharing with a Family account, free upgrades for all the 1Password apps on all of your devices, and so much more. Your data is still cached locally on your device to ensure you can access it offline. It is still fully encrypted end-to-end by your Master Password, and your 1Password membership adds an extra layer of protection in the form of your Secret Key (super long, I wouldn’t even be able to guess my own if I tried). We never know either of these keys, so your data is nothing but a useless encrypted blob on our servers (just like on Dropbox or iCloud with a standalone vault). We couldn't unlock it even if we wanted to (which we don't).

    We know the cloud can be scary to some. By being transparent about our security design, whether you’re a security researcher digging deep into the weeds or not, we give you the opportunity to assess the security of 1Password for yourself. A plain language rundown of our security design, as well as our technical security white paper, can be found on our support site — just search “security” and you’ll see it. Plus, if you want to put 1Password’s security through it’s paces, we’ll not only allow you to do that, we’ll write you a nice check if you break it via our bug bounty program.

    Of course, we love 1Password memberships. They make security easy for folks of all stripes and we couldn’t be happier about that. Still, our goal isn’t and never has been to force anyone to use one. If you have corporate or regional restrictions that keep you from having your data on our servers, or even if you just prefer syncing (or not) manually, then standalone vaults are here for you. We may extol the virtues of 1Password memberships and go on a bit about how great they are, but our excitement is not a mandate. We hope you give a 1Password membership a try to see for yourself why we’re so excited, but at the end of the day the choice is always yours. ?

    • Ashton
      December 18, 2017 at 12:00 am

      If the data can only be decrypted by key/pass how does the account recovery on family plan work?

  7. Sigh
    December 13, 2017 at 3:20 am

    Yet another misinformed rant against 1Password. I urge readers to educate themselves about what 1Password is doing instead of listening to lies spread by sensationalist websites like this one.

  8. Tranh
    December 13, 2017 at 2:24 am

    The cloud service isn't even a new option they provide. When you say "recent," you are months behind.

  9. Dang
    December 13, 2017 at 12:45 am

    You suggest that people shy of cloud-based passwords replace a cloud provider with a sterling rep with cloud providers (except for Buttercup which stores locally) of often unknown vintage? If you are going to be critical of the cloud-based paradigm, then offer only suggestions that do local... heard of keepass? That would seem fair at least.

    And the next version reintroduces local vaults for Windows.

    Agilebits and 1Password have earned their well-regarded rep.

  10. Kate
    December 12, 2017 at 6:26 pm

    Full disclosure: I work for AgileBits, the maker of 1Password. While we understand a hosted solution isn’t for everyone, if you are under the impression that our offering 1Password memberships means you are required to move your data to the cloud to use 1Password, that’s absolutely not the case. When you install 1Password, you're offered a choice as to how to sync and store your data. You can create a standalone vault and choose your own sync method (WLAN, Dropbox, iCloud, or none at all), or sign up for a 1Password membership and sync via our secure servers. No matter which option you choose, your data is always encrypted end-to-end and stays where you put it. No one is moving your data anywhere (except you — you can move it whenever you’d like, including out of 1Password if you’re so inclined, though we hope you'll stick around) and the choice of how to sync and store your data is yours and yours alone.

    Of course, there are tons of great reasons to choose a 1Password membership (we’ve published some highlights here: https://support.1password.com/why-account/). Your membership includes everything that made you choose 1Password in the first place (A+ security, 24/7 support, those same 1Password apps you already love), plus automatic syncing, secure and simple sharing with a Family account, and free upgrades for all the 1Password apps on all of your devices. Your data is still cached locally on your device to ensure you can access it offline. It is still fully encrypted end-to-end by your Master Password, and your 1Password membership adds an extra layer of protection in the form of your Secret Key (learn more here: https://support.1password.com/secret-key-security/). We never know either of these keys, so your data is nothing but a useless encrypted blob on our servers (just like on Dropbox or iCloud with a standalone vault). We couldn't unlock it even if we wanted to (which we don't). Jeff Goldberg, Our Chief Defender Against the Dark Arts, talks about key storage more in-depth here: https://blog.agilebits.com/2017/06/07/be-your-own-key-master-with-1password/

    We were actually somewhat slow to offer a hosted service. One of the reasons for this is that we aren't willing to introduce a new feature at the expense of security and privacy and for a long while such a solution didn’t pass muster. It was tempting, as offering such a service would have (and ultimately did) open a lot of doors for us. 1Password memberships have allowed us to address some pain points with switching devices, Master Password recovery and more, but it wasn’t until we were able to implement security features like Two-Secret Key Derivation that we were ready to take that plunge (Jeff again, with a lovely explanation of how this works: https://blog.agilebits.com/2017/05/04/1password-is-layerup-ed-with-modern-authentication/).

    Despite the efforts that went into the 1Password security model, we know that security is a process. Technology changes quickly. New security tools are born and old ones are broken and it’s up to us to keep up. Part of that process is designing a good system out of the gate, but the more important part is proactively improving that system. By being transparent about our security design, whether you’re a security researcher digging deep into the weeds (our Security White Paper can be found here: https://1password.com/teams/white-paper/) or not (a plain language rundown of our security design is here: https://support.1password.com/1password-security/), we not only give you the opportunity to assess the security of 1Password for yourself, we give ourselves the opportunity to improve with the benefit of an outside perspective. Plus, if you want to put 1Password’s security through it’s paces, we’ll not only allow you to do that, we’ll write you a nice check if you break it: https://blog.agilebits.com/2017/03/09/more-than-just-a-penny-for-your-thoughts-100000-top-bounty/

    Of course, we love 1Password memberships. They make security easy for folks of all stripes and we couldn’t be happier about that. Still, our goal isn’t and never has been to force anyone to use one. If you have corporate or regional restrictions that keep you from having your data on our servers, or even if you just prefer syncing (or not) manually, then standalone vaults are here for you. We may extol the virtues of 1Password memberships and go on a bit about how great they are, but our excitement is not a mandate. We hope you give a 1Password membership a try to see for yourself why we’re so excited, but at the end of the day the choice is always yours. ?

  11. Roustem
    December 12, 2017 at 5:37 pm

    Don't believe the FUD.

    1Password is not "moving" your data to the cloud. You have a choice where to store your data.

  12. Stephen
    December 12, 2017 at 4:10 pm

    The stored data is encrypted. This change isn’t enough for me to leave 1Password.

    How many of these unknown programs will be around in a year, or will stay on top of OS updates and new vulnerabilities? 1P has been very open about how their stuff works, and stays on top of updates. I’m staying.

  13. ciscokid
    December 12, 2017 at 3:05 pm

    I will stick with Keepass as it supports two factor authentication. I ahve both the mobile app and the desktop windows program. Been using it for 5 years without issue.

  14. Marcos Alano
    December 12, 2017 at 1:28 pm

    I really like Enpass. The mobile app costs some bucks, but it's amazing, even lack some features like OpenYOLO and full 2-factor support.

  15. Kevin Morrissey
    December 12, 2017 at 11:35 am

    If you are a "legacy" user of 1Password, nothing will change. At the very least, your article is misleading regarding 1Password. The local version of the app is still available for download and it syncs with Dropbox for convenience across all of your devices while the drop box files are stored locally. An important barrier to switching wasn't mentioned - the hassle associated with recreating all of your passwords, for me, that's a daunting task since I have 230+ passwords.

    • Jon
      December 12, 2017 at 5:10 pm

      Kevin, you're absolutely correct, except I wouldn't call 1Password 6 a "legacy" app. It's the latest version of the desktop app and is constantly updated.
      I have over 1,000 unique passwords! Luckily it's possible to export them to a file (CSV or TXT). Whether other apps can import them is another matter. And of course, don't leave an un-encrypted file with all your passwords lying around!

  16. IamGroot
    December 12, 2017 at 9:17 am

    I'll stick with 1Password thanks, the others are all knock offs and LastPass is my LastChoice (also stores in the cloud btw!)

  17. Xenon88
    December 12, 2017 at 8:16 am

    What about bitwarden, a great open source lastpass and 1password alternative.