You’re Being Watched Online

You’re Being Watched Online

Yes, everything you do online is being tracked. Your searches, the videos you watch, transactions, social events, even crime. Scandalous crimes. With a little help, especially with our guides, you’re still able to remain anonymous on the Internet. But understanding how you’re being tracked is an important lesson, as are the little things you can do to maintain your privacy.

via Tech Genie

Comments (16)
  • Kofi

    Does disabling flash mean that you can’t watch Youtube anymore?

  • Guy A

    I thought it was only Paedophiles that would be interested for this type of information.Why would you want to help them?

  • Elad P

    I never understood that paranoid people who freak out from the though that they are being watched online. Big freaking deal! What do you have to hide so badly?
    If you are so concerned about your privacy you probably SHOULD be followed because you are probably involved in some illegal stuff. The rest of us “ordinary”, law keeping citizens of the globe would have to live with the fact that robots (not people, just robots) will monitor our habits in order to serve us ads which may actually interest or help us instead of just showing us random crap we will never buy.

    • Elad P

      If a certain software can detect I have a certain illness and as a result can show me a proper ad to a medicine that can solve my illness then by all means!
      The government ALREADY have the ability to track your location, and so are the police and any other law enforcing agency and they don’t even need the internet for that…
      I’m curious to know in what scenario exactly were you forced to give a sensitive information about yourself to the government? Again, that sounds like an old school paranoia to me.
      What’s wrong with giving my bank account details? I already give them to anyone that needs to pay me for my work.
      And a lot of houses are ALREADY getting robbed because people brag on social networks that they are going on vacation. That has nothing to do with privacy or the government. Just naivety and opportunist assholes.
      In conclusion, there isn’t any privacy problem with the internet – the only problem is people that over share information and they are the only one to blame for it.
      Grapterfeltz, I advise you to use some common sense (on the internet and in real life as well) and you should be just fine ;)

    • Grapterfeltz

      So, a company should have access to the fact that you’re searching for information regarding a personal matter, perhaps a medical one? The government should have the ability to track your exact location at any time? Is that what you think is a good idea. Personally, I value my privacy. Sure, I use Facebook, but that’s my CHOICE. I shouldn’t be forced to reveal all of my personal information to a company at all, and I shouldn’t have to give any information to the government unless I’m suspected of a crime. That’s part of the founding principles of the United States, and one of the reasons the US seceded from the United Kingdom. Since you’re feeling so helpful, why don’t you post the details of your bank account, your home address, and what time you and your family leave your house, since you “aren’t doing anything wrong.”

  • dragonmouth

    “Is privacy no longer a term for the Internet?”
    It never was! Knowledge is power and data is money.

  • Don Gateley

    Is the purpose of this “article” only to link to another one?

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For more details, please read our disclosure.
Affiliate Disclamer

This review may contain affiliate links, which pays us a small compensation if you do decide to make a purchase based on our recommendation. Our judgement is in no way biased, and our recommendations are always based on the merits of the items.

For more details, please read our disclosure.