Setting Up An Email Client? Here Is Mail Server Info For The 3 Biggest Email Providers

email2   Setting Up An Email Client? Here Is Mail Server Info For The 3 Biggest Email ProvidersDo you still use any desktop email clients? The last one that I ever made any significant use of was Outlook Express, and that feels like forever ago. Since then, I’ve given both Thunderbird and Postbox (which I was very impressed with) a spin, but desktop email clients in general seem like a lost cause to a Gmail user like myself. Nothing beats the Gmail web interface, in my opinion.

My opinion isn’t the law of the land though. I know many of you still prefer to have your emails piped through a desktop client, and it offers several advantages. For example, being able to skip to a particular middle area in your email pile. Doing this is actually extremely hard with Gmail when only using their web-based client.

That being said, setting up your email accounts can be a discouraging hassle.

tb1   Setting Up An Email Client? Here Is Mail Server Info For The 3 Biggest Email Providers

Luckily for you and I, most major email clients (both mobile and for the desktop) now support automatic look-ups for the most common email providers. It’s convenient to be able to set up an email account by only entering a username and password, as opposed to having to manually configure your incoming and outgoing settings. But, this feature only exists with certain software and apps.

I understand that there are still people who use and prefer Windows XP, and I realize that there are some of you who still use an outdated email client (such as Outlook Express) by matter of preference. You have not been forgotten! I’ve experienced many headaches in attempting to manually configure email accounts by memory, and I’ve decided to put together a list of mail server info that will keep you from the same discomfort.

outlook   Setting Up An Email Client? Here Is Mail Server Info For The 3 Biggest Email Providers

Before getting into that though, it’s important that you understand the differences between POP/SMTP and IMAP.

POP/SMTP servers are becoming increasingly less popular. A POP server downloads messages from the server directly to your computer. This is good if you need to read mail offline or otherwise search through emails. It gets a little questionable when you consider that you can lose an entire email account during a hard drive failure.

IMAP servers are generally considered to be a more user-friendly and permanent solution to keeping track of your emails. Using IMAP, your emails are stored remotely and remain on the mail server. This however causes issues with making complete backups of your mail account. It makes searching through emails a slower experience, too.

Gmail

gmail logo   Setting Up An Email Client? Here Is Mail Server Info For The 3 Biggest Email Providers

POP server address: pop.gmail.com
POP user name: Your complete email address (“me@gmail.com” for example)
POP password: Your password
POP port: 995
POP TLS/SSL required: yes

SMTP server address: smtp.gmail.com
SMTP user name: Your complete email address (“me@gmail.com” for example)
SMTP password: Your password
SMTP port: 465
SMTP TLS/SSL required: yes

IMAP server address: imap.gmail.com
IMAP user name: Your complete email address (“me@gmail.com” for example)
IMAP password: Your password
IMAP port: 993
IMAP TLS/SSL required: yes

Outlook.com/Windows Live/Hotmail

Hotmail logo   Setting Up An Email Client? Here Is Mail Server Info For The 3 Biggest Email Providers

POP server address: pop3.live.com
POP user name: Your complete email address (“me@hotmail.com” or “me@live.com” for example)
POP password: Your password
POP port: 995
POP TLS/SSL required: yes

SMTP server address: smtp.live.com
SMTP user name: Your complete email address (“me@hotmail.com” or “me@live.com” for example)
SMTP password: Your password
SMTP port: 587
SMTP TLS/SSL required: yes

Outlook.com/Windows Live/Hotmail does not currently support IMAP.

Yahoo! Mail

yahoo logo   Setting Up An Email Client? Here Is Mail Server Info For The 3 Biggest Email Providers

POP server address: pop.mail.yahoo.com
POP user name: Your complete email address (“me@yahoo.com” for example)
POP password: Your password
POP port: 995
POP TLS/SSL required: yes

SMTP server address: smtp.mail.yahoo.com
SMTP user name: Your complete email address (“me@yahoo.com” for example)
SMTP password: Your password
SMTP port: 465
SMTP TLS/SSL required: yes

IMAP server address: imap.mail.yahoo.com
IMAP user name: Your complete email address (“me@yahoo.com” for example)
IMAP password: Your password
IMAP port: 993
IMAP TLS/SSL required: yes

These three email providers make up a huge chunk of the pie. Even so, I’m aware that some of you may go off the grid and choose another provider or prefer sticking with an ISP email address (with someone like Comcast). POP/SMTP and IMAP information for many other providers can be found on Google (by querying, for example, “Comcast SMTP servers”).

I hope this article can act as a good bookmark to those of you who are often setting up new email accounts. It can be very frustrating to have to search the web and find varying results or information that is incomplete. If you’re having trouble setting up an email account in any client or you’re looking for mail server info, leave me a comment and I’ll be sure to help.

The comments were closed because the article is more than 180 days old.

If you have any questions related to what's mentioned in the article or need help with any computer issue, ask it on MakeUseOf Answers—We and our community will be more than happy to help.

14 Comments -

0 votes

Gary Volk

One thing I always do with gmail, at least in Thunderbird as that is what I use is the following: goto account settings/server settings and click advanced. In the IMAP server directory enter [Gmail]. The G must be caps, and this only applies when using IMAP. This will allow you to map gmails labels as folders and vica-versa. Very handy. I am one that prefers to have a desktop email client. I have never liked Gmails web interface, and like it even less with all the changes they have made. I also prefer actual threaded emails, not the way gmail does it. But too each his own, at least we have choices in the matter. Thanks.

0 votes

Alex Downs

I personally love the gmail interface and swear by it, same thing with Postbox. I don’t know why I never really got behind Thunderbird, but Postbox is all I need. It works well with detecting Gmail and Hotmail/Outlook/Live whatever you want to call it now. I use it for that and my private school email and 1&1 mail server on the site I’m a part of. Both have very clean simple looks which I like. For some reason it would automatically detect 1&1 with 1und1 so change “u” to “a” problem solved.

0 votes

Nevzat Akkaya

Great article, bookmarked! thanks.

0 votes

Chew Jian Yue

Should start using email clients now./..

0 votes

Dave Bakker

I’ve used Gmail for a while. I use the label feature and rules a lot. I have all my mail go through Gmail, and have the gmail app on my phone. With the use of the labels and rules I have only my important emails come to my inbox so i dont get swamped by junk emails. The spam filter is quite good, better than what my office server picks up. Searching email, grouping conversations are crucial components.

0 votes

Scott

I personally love using Outlook 2007 for my offline client. Not only does it provide an offline back-up of my email (which is also stored at two different online locations), but I find two features especially useful for me: autocorrect (when composing) and ‘edit message’ (where I can edit the subject and/or the message body of incoming messages). The latter saves a lot of ‘sending to self’ hassle when I really need to change a poorly chosen subject of an email I received. :-)

Unfortunately, Outlook 2007 doesn’t have quite the amount of server information for various providers, so it must be done manually for the ‘lesser-knowns.’

0 votes

Alan Wade

I only ever use a client. I normally bounce between Thunderbird, Postbox and Outlook depending on my mood.
For customization, it has to be TBird.
For simplicity it has to be Postbox.
For sheer power it has to be Outlook.

Why do I bounce around?
Thunderbird, I really like but there are times, most times infact, when it will not hold my passwords. This is irritating to me as I then have to open my Protected Folder vault to retrieve and insert the passwords.
Postbox is OK but I do like a bit more than just an email client that cannot (at least when I last used it) be customized.
Outlook, it has everything and more I could ever want. After a little bit of tweaking here and there both in the app and in the registry, it is as good as it gets.

Why dont I use Gmail’s or any other online client? I dont want to open my browser and then navigate to either Gmail’s server or my ISP’s to read my mail. I want to click on my notifier and have it open my client which happily checks and retrieves my email from three different accounts and sorts it accordingly.

I always use the manual method of entering my server details as I want to decide if it is to be POP or IMAP but must agree that the automated method does save time.

0 votes

Alan Wade

As a follow up, my Gmail SMTP port is 587 not 465 as you suggested.

0 votes

suneo nobi

nice info………Thunderbird is a good desktop client for spam protection

0 votes

dragonmouth

My biggest peeve with GMail is that I cannot sort mail by column.

0 votes

Yudono R.A.

never know how to set it before, now i know :D thanks for the article

1 votes

Garris Rago

I’ll hopefully get postbox with some makeuseof points, sounds great

0 votes

Paul Girardin

Thank you for this!

I was having a hard time with Postbox and Hotmail which is now settled because of these explanations!

0 votes

Paul Girardin

Thank you for this!

I was having a hard time with Postbox and Hotmail which is now settled because of these explanations!