What Is WSAPPX and Why Does It Cause High Disk and CPU Usage in Windows 10?
Pinterest Stumbleupon Whatsapp
Advertisement

If you’ve ever scrolled through the list of processes running in the Task Manager, you might have come across an entry named WSAPPX. It’s notable for two reasons: its strange name can raise suspicion, and it often uses a lot of CPU How to Fix High CPU Usage in Windows How to Fix High CPU Usage in Windows If your computer fans frequently hit top speeds, it's a sign that your CPU is fully loaded. Simultaneously, your computer may slow down. That's annoying, especially if you're not actually doing anything. Read More and disk resources.

We’re here to explain what the WSAPPX process is, what it’s for, and how you can deal with its high disk and CPU usage.

What Is WSAPPX?

WSAPPX is a process that handles the new Universal apps Are You Confused by the Windows App Terminology? Are You Confused by the Windows App Terminology? Did you ever wonder what's the difference between an application, program, or software? Or whether that Windows app is metro, modern, universal, or plain straight? You're not alone. Let us clear things up! Read More and the Microsoft Store (formerly Windows Store) in Windows 8 and 10. Since these Modern/Universal apps didn’t exist on Windows 7 and earlier, you won’t see this process on those Windows versions.

You can find it by opening the Task Manager (press Ctrl + Shift + Esc). Select the Processes tab, and scroll all the way to the bottom.

what is wsappx and why high cpu ram issues windows 10

The process includes two sub-processes which you can see by expanding it in the Task Manager. On Windows 8, there’s a sub-process named WSService, or Windows Store Service. You’ll find an essentially identical process on Windows 10 as ClipSVC, short for Client License Service.

Both Windows 10 and Windows 8 also include AppXSVC, the AppX Deployment Service.

What Do These Processes Do?

This all sounds complicated, but it’s really not. According to their entries in the Services panel, ClipSVC and WSService both “provide infrastructure support for the Microsoft Store.” If you disable them, Store apps won’t work, because these processes handle licensing. They’re designed to protect against piracy for Windows Store apps (if such a thing exists).

The other process, AppXSVC, works to deploy apps. This means that it runs anytime you install, remove, or update a Store app. Its name comes from the file extension for Store apps, AppX. Conversely, traditional desktop software usually runs from an executable file ending in EXE.

Like Android apps (with the APK file extension), you can grab AppX files from anywhere and sideload them onto your PC How to Sideload Apps on Windows 8 & 10 How to Sideload Apps on Windows 8 & 10 The Windows Store isn't the only place where you can get universal apps. We show you how to install apps from external sources using PowerShell or the Settings menu. Read More . However, doing this could open you up to malware if you’re not careful.

Because these sub-processes all run under the main WSAPPX process, you’ll see its usage increase when any one of them is active.

Why Is WSAPPX Using So Many Resources?

In most cases, you’ll only see WSAPPX active when you’re using the Microsoft Store The Best Windows 10 Apps The Best Windows 10 Apps Windows 10 Store apps have come a long way. Meanwhile, you can choose from a considerable selection, free and paid. We have picked out the ones worth your while. Read More . Simply opening it and browsing around will cause the process to start. When downloading an app or installing an update, it will naturally use more resources since it needs them for the install process.

When you install traditional desktop software, their installation processes take up resources, too. However, instead of running under the WSAPPX process, you’ll see the new program’s entry hitting your CPU and disk.

If you never use the Microsoft Store or Modern apps, yet still see WSAPPX active, it’s almost certainly due to apps updating in the background. Thankfully, you can prevent this.

How to Stop Store Apps From Automatically Updating

Disabling automatic updates for Store apps How To Turn Off Automatic App Updates In Windows 10 How To Turn Off Automatic App Updates In Windows 10 Deactivating system updates isn't advised. But if need be, here's how you do it on Windows 10. Read More is easy.

Type store into the Start Menu and open the Microsoft Store entry. Here, click the three-dot Menu icon in the top-right, then select Settings. In the Settings menu, toggle the Update apps automatically slider to Off.

what is wsappx and why high cpu ram issues windows 10

This will prevent app updates unless you manually trigger them. To check for updates, click the Menu button again and choose Downloads and updates. Hit the Get updates button to check for any, and install them as you see fit.

While you’re in the Settings menu, you may also want to disable annoying auto-playing videos.

But Do I Use Any Modern Apps?

True, the majority of Windows users are used to normal desktop programs and the Microsoft Store is full of junk apps. But the Store still contains some great offerings 10 Windows Store Apps You Didn't Know Existed 10 Windows Store Apps You Didn't Know Existed Big names have finally entered the Windows Store. You might not realize just how good it's become. Let us show you what you've missed. Read More .

Even if you haven’t downloaded any new apps, many of Windows 10’s built-in apps are solid. The Xbox app is great for gamers, the Calculator is now a Modern app, and the Photos and Mail apps are decent defaults if you haven’t swapped them out 7 More Default Windows Apps You Should Replace 7 More Default Windows Apps You Should Replace Windows includes a lot of default software, but you can find superior alternatives for many tools. Here are seven more you should consider replacing. Read More . Thus, if you use any of these (or others like Weather, Calendar, and People 12 Neglected Windows 10 Apps & Why You Must Try Them 12 Neglected Windows 10 Apps & Why You Must Try Them You might be unaware of many default apps in Windows 10 or you underestimated their usefulness. We have compiled a dozen apps that can transform the way you work and we'll show you how. Read More ), you’ll see some extra usage from WSAPPX.

Since apps are a major part of Windows 10, we don’t recommend disabling automatic updates unless they’re grinding your system to a halt. For most people, remembering to check for updates manually is tough.

Removing Bloatware and Stopping Background Apps

While you shouldn’t disable automatic updates, you can take a few steps to prevent Store apps from running when you don’t want them to.

The first is removing bloatware apps from your system How to Easily Remove Bloatware From Windows 10 How to Easily Remove Bloatware From Windows 10 Windows 10 comes with several pre-installed apps that take up space on your device and aren't easy to remove. Sounds like bloatware, doesn't it? We show you how to remove these apps. Read More . As you’ve likely seen, Windows 10 comes with some pre-installed junk like Candy Crush Saga. If you never play this, you don’t want it updating in the background and wasting resources.

You can visit Settings > Apps > Apps & features to browse everything installed on your PC. Click an app and choose Uninstall to purge it. If you have a lot of trash apps to remove, check our guide to removing bloatware en masse Tired of Bloatware? How to Purge Windows 10 Store Apps Tired of Bloatware? How to Purge Windows 10 Store Apps For Microsoft, Windows 10 is a cash machine. With future updates, more apps will be pre-installed and promoted on the Start Menu. Let us show you how to easily remove pre-installed Windows Store apps. Read More .

what is wsappx and why high cpu ram issues windows 10

Once you prune the list, you’ll only have apps you actually care about remaining. Another step you should take is preventing apps from running in the background 9 Windows 10 Features You Can Safely Disable 9 Windows 10 Features You Can Safely Disable Windows 10 is packed with features, but a lot of them are unnecessary. Here's how to safely prune unwanted features off your Windows 10 system for a more streamlined experience. Read More . Visit Settings > Privacy > Background apps to toggle this on a per-app basis.

If you disable an app from running in the background, it can’t check for new notifications or do anything else when you’re not using it. Feel free to disable ones you never use, but take care not to disable Mail if you use it as your primary email app 5 of the Best Desktop Email Clients That Don't Cost a Dime 5 of the Best Desktop Email Clients That Don't Cost a Dime You need a desktop email client to handle your incoming mail? We show you the best desktop email clients you can get for free. Read More , for instance. You can also toggle the slider at the top of the screen to completely disable background apps.

what is wsappx and why high cpu ram issues windows 10

Can’t I Kill This Process?

Windows considers WSAPPX a vital system process. Thus, if you try to end it via the Task Manager, it warns you that ending the process can cause Windows to become unstable.

what is wsappx and why high cpu ram issues windows 10

However, when we went ahead and ended the process anyway, Windows threw an error but didn’t show any signs of instability.

You don’t have any control over when WSAPPX starts and stops. It will pop up when needed (if you’re browsing the Store or interacting with apps) and close when it’s done. Like other system processes, you don’t need to micromanage this. Windows does a fine job on its own of handling processes, and the above steps should take care of any high resource usage you see from WSAPPX.

If you still have problems, after trying these solutions out, you may need to perform some troubleshooting because Store apps alone probably aren’t the issue. Start with our tips for fixing the Microsoft Store How to Fix the Windows Store and Its Apps in Windows 10 How to Fix the Windows Store and Its Apps in Windows 10 Ever had problems in Windows 10 with opening the Store or one of your apps? It's a common issue and we've rounded up steps to help you fix it. Read More .

Have You Experienced Issues With WSAPPX?

That’s all there is to know about WSAPPX and what causes it to use resources. Since it’s tied to Microsoft Store apps, removing any you don’t use, preventing apps from running in the background, and turning off automatic updates (if you want to go that far) should suppress it.

Remember that a system process running is a normal part of Windows operation How Windows Performance Is Affected by Hardware & Software How Windows Performance Is Affected by Hardware & Software In theory, 32-bit software could outperform its 64-bit counterpart, depending on the hardware setup. Sounds complicated? We're here to make sense and help you get the best performance out of your system. Read More , and you shouldn’t freak out unless WSAPPX is constantly using large amounts of resources.

Have you seen WSAPPX use more resources than it should? Do you use any Store apps, or have you banished them from your PC? Tell us down in the comments!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  1. LeoSabri
    December 6, 2017 at 5:18 pm

    No point talking about Microsoft rubbish OS. No one cares what the hell this and that running but usually care our PC's work in good condition coz we have work to do! Seems too many error in Windows 10 nowadays especially on Windows Update sooner Microsoft going down to Hell FOREVER!!

    • Ben Stegner
      December 6, 2017 at 5:21 pm

      Seeing as Windows is the most widely-used OS in the world and Windows 10 is the latest version, I'd say it's worth talking about.

      • Eddie G.
        December 9, 2017 at 3:09 am

        Only if you use it. I use Linux, have walked away from Windows since '02. And I'm never going back. its not a good OS, it might be "ok" for others, but because of a lack of trust? I will never install that OS on any PC I ever own. So I guess it IS worth talking about...IF you use it! Which I don't

        • Ben Stegner
          December 9, 2017 at 4:05 pm

          By that logic, we shouldn't write about Android, macOS, iOS, or any other platform that *you* don't use.

          I don't understand why you're upset that we've written advice for an OS you don't use. If you don't use it, why waste your time reading the article and leaving a snarky comment on it?