When Windows Update Fails, This Is How You Fix It

The recent Windows 8.1 August Update blindsided many users with issues. Some experienced BSODs or black screens, while others found themselves stuck in an infinite reboot loop.

If you’ve been negatively affected by a Windows Update, here’s a quick list of troubleshooting steps that will help you restore Windows to a functional state.

Windows Crashes With A Blue Screen Of Death

A BSOD typically hints to a hardware problem or faulty drivers, but can also be caused by third-party software. We have previously shown you how to troubleshoot a BSOD in Windows 8.

Windows 8 BSOD   When Windows Update Fails, This Is How You Fix It

The August Update BSOD

After applying the Windows August Update, many Windows 7 and 8 users experienced BSOD crashes with a 0×50 Stop error message. According to Microsoft Community member xformer, KB2982791 is the culprit. This update causes Win32k.sys to crash when the font cache is not correctly maintained.

According to Microsoft, August Update BSOD crashes are caused by the following updates, which subsequently have been disabled:

  • KB2982791, a security update for kernel-mode drivers.
  • KB2970228, the update introducing support for the Russion Ruble currency symbol.
  • KB2975719, the August Update rollup for Windows RT 8.1, Windows 8.1, and Windows Server 2012 R2.
  • KB2975331, the August Update rollup for Windows RT, Windows 8, and Windows Server 2012.

How To Fix It

A workaround proposed by Microsoft Community member rvuerinckx recommends to boot from a recovery disk and remove the following file:

C:\Windows\System32\FNTCACHE.DAT

In a response, community member Laurens (NLD) posted a step-by-step explanation on how to remove the file via the command prompt. Briefly, insert your Windows 7 or 8 installation or recovery disk and boot from the disk. In Windows 7, go to restore options, choose repair tools, and select command prompt. In Windows 8, go to troubleshoot and advanced options, and select command prompt from here.

Type the following command:

del %windir%\system32\fntcache.dat

When the file is gone, you should be able to boot into Windows. Microsoft Support says this is only a temporary fix and they explain how to remove a registry key for a permanent solution. Please see the mitigations for known issue 3 for details. After removing the offending updates (see below), you can restore the registry file, the support page explains how this is done.

I Can’t Boot Into Windows Anymore

When a Windows Update is so bad that you can no longer boot the system, try booting into Safe Mode to remove it.

To boot into Safe Mode in Windows 7, hit the F8 key while the computer is booting up and before the Windows logo can be seen. You know you hit the right moment, when you see the advanced boot options screen.

SafeMode02   When Windows Update Fails, This Is How You Fix It

When Windows 8 or 8.1 crashes repetitively, it should at some point boot into Automatic Repair. Select Advanced options to access Safe Mode.

windows 8.1 automatic repair boot screen   When Windows Update Fails, This Is How You Fix It

You can manually boot into Safe Mode by pressing the SHIFT key while clicking Restart and subsequently click Restart under Sartup Settings, found under Troubleshoot and Advanced options.

Once you are in Safe Mode, you can navigate to Windows Update via the Control Panel and remove the most recent updates, see instructions below.

Uninstall Windows Updates In Windows

Uninstalling updates from within Windows is very simple. Briefly, navigate to Installed Updates (View installed updates under Windows Update or Programs and Features) in the Control Panel, select the problematic update, and click the Uninstall button or right-click it and select Uninstall.

Uninstall Windows Update   When Windows Update Fails, This Is How You Fix It

Uninstall Windows Update Via Command Prompt

When an issue with a Windows Update prevents your computer from booting, not even into Safe Mode, things get tricky. You will need a Windows boot or recovery disk to launch into repair tools (Windows 7) or advanced options (Windows 8), from where you can access the command prompt.

Assuming your system drive is C, type the following command to find the package names of the offending updates:

dism /image:C:\ /get-packages

Search the results for the update that needs to be removed and note down the package name. Then use the following command:

dism /image:C:\ /remove-package/PackageName:Package_for_insert_exact_package_name_here

Example: dism /image:C:\ /remove-package/PackageName:Package_for_KB2976897~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~6.1.1.0

After removing the update, try to reboot and fingers crossed all will be well.

Hide Windows Updates

Sometimes, updates are known to cause problems before you apply them. Or maybe you don’t accidentally want to re-install an update that made your computer crash. Navigate to Windows Update in the Control panel, right-click the troublesome update, and select Hide update.

Hide Windows Update   When Windows Update Fails, This Is How You Fix It

To restore a hidden update, click the respective link in the Windows Update sidebar.

For a full walkthrough with screenshots of the process, see Windows SevenForums.

None Of The Above Works

The issues you’re experiencing may go deeper than a Windows Update bug. Please consult our guide on troubleshooting Windows 8 crashes. Windows 8 boot issues can be easy to resolve, but an infinite reboot loop may require a system recovery. If you’re able to boot into Windows 8 Advanced Startup Options, you can try to repair, restore, refresh, or reset your PC.

windows 8 advanced startup options   When Windows Update Fails, This Is How You Fix It

Has Windows Update Caused You Pain?

Have you ever had to resolve issues caused by a Windows Update in the past? How did you do it?

Let’s hear your experiences in the comments!

57 Comments - Write a Comment

0 votes
Reply

dragonmouth

“When Windows Update Fails, This Is How You Fix It”
Congratulations! You’ve been done in by a typical M$ update that corrupts your system. Quit banging your head against the M$ wall and switch to an entirely different O/S that is not produced in Redmond, Wash.

The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again (in this case applying Windows updates) and expecting a different result each time (in this case an update without problems).

2 votes

Jayden R

You act like perfection is the standard in any program ???
I’m sorry Microsoft staff aren’t godlike programmers that can account for every single possible instance that their update will cause problems across several brands and generations of hardware ???

0 votes

Tina S

You’re right, Microsoft’s quality control sucks. Let’s hope it’s because they have given up on Windows 8 and are focusing on making it right with Windows 9. ;)

0 votes

dragonmouth

@JaydenR:
“You act like perfection is the standard in any program ???
Isn’t the object of the exercise to produce as error-free code as possible?

The problem, I suspect, does not lie with the programmers. It lies with upper management and corporate policy. I suspect the policy at M$ is to get the product out into the market ASAP, if not sooner, giving the developers inadequate time to test properly. If bad updates occurred only once in a while, I would agree with you. But they have been a regular occurence ever since Microsoft came into being. So much so that M$ updates have become a running joke. Don’t you think that in the past 30 years M$ should/could have gotten its s**t together?

“that their update will cause problems across several brands and generations of hardware ???”
That is a specious argument. Linux and BSD developers also have to deal with the problem of diversity of hardware when coding their updates. When was the last time you heard of MUO or any other blogger or magazine wrote an article on backing out a Linux/BSD update?

0 votes

moi

Yes, because all other operating systems are perfect.

1 votes

dragonmouth

Other systems are not perfect. Nobody is even suggesting that. But they don’t have the problems Windows has.

0 votes

Anonymous

Dear Dragon,
Tell us a little about your perfect self.

0 votes

Bob P

Dear Dragon,
Tell us a little about your perfect self.

0 votes

Bob P

Dear Dragon,
Tell us a little about your perfect self.

0 votes

dragonmouth

You’re repeating yourself, Bob P. You must be using Windows. :P

0 votes

Mark

Windows update without problems is unlikely? My windows XP computer through 7 years have only had a few blue screens, and never while updating. My windows vista laptop through 5 years, while I’ve never been a fan of the laptop itself or vista, has never encountered a blue screen. Sometimes in a rush I’ve shut off power to it while updating or installing updates, never encountering problems with automatic, proper reinstallation afterwards.

Maybe it’s just user error on your behalf. And talk about Windows problems all you want, but if you’re going to ignore it’s advantages, well then you’re just another dumbass fanboy of whatever OS you’re using. Obviously I have no qualms about using Windows, but as with all other operating systems, it has drawbacks, yes, but it also has advantages. And it isn’t just an OS this goes for. To educate you further, think about this: Everything has drawbacks and advantages. The goal is to find a solution for you, which has drawbacks that affects you the least.
If you don’t utilize the advantages of Windows, but feel troubled by the drawbacks, then yes, Mac may be a better option for you. It is for many people. That’s fine. But don’t be an ignorant fool on the internet bashing something just because it isn’t perfect for you, that’s just pathetic.

Oh well, I belive I’ve seen you bash Windows before on some other MUO article, so considering you’ve made it your priority mission, I’m probably speaking to a lost cause. But who knows, perhaps a less dense individual comes along and thinks: “Hm, that arrogant bastard Mark is actually right on this one… Even though I think Windows sucks, it may be useful for other people, so there’s no reason for me to rage about it on a tech site, whose audience knows I’d be talking BS anyway.”
Because that’s all I wish for. I’m fine with people using another operating system, if that works for you, that’s great, I’m sincerely happy for you. But Windows works as well, even if it doesn’t excel at the things you use your computer for. So get your head out of your oh wait, rant stops here, my popcorn are finished.

0 votes

dragonmouth

“if you’re going to ignore it’s advantages, well then you’re just another dumbass fanboy of whatever OS you’re using.”
So, what you are trying to so diplomatically say, is that unless I use and sing the praises of Windows, I am a dumbass? I wonder what refusing to see the disadvantages of Windows makes you? :-)

“I’m probably speaking to a lost cause.”
Yes, you are. After 15 years of enjoying the “advantages” of various versions of Windows, I switched to an O/S with fewer drawbacks – Linux.

““Hm, that arrogant bastard Mark is actually right on this one… ”
With more and more individual, corporate and municipal users dumping Windows every day, I wonder. But then, if Windows works for you, that’s great, I’m sincerely happy for you.

“I’m fine with people using another operating system”
As long as they do not say anything negative about Windows. Right?

As a long time devoted Windows user who knows its advantages, maybe you can answer a question for me. Why do MUO and other tech sites, have to write aricles such as “When Windows Update Fails, This Is How You Fix It”? As far as I know they do not write such fix-it articles for any other O/S. Why is that?

1 votes
Reply

Jerica

Jayden, Microsoft may not be godlike programmers, but they do need to test and retest that their software and updates don’t screw up millions of customers’ computers. If you own a Windows computer, it can seem that you need to update just about every day. But those updates aren’t written/created in a day; it takes weeks to identify problems in a system and to create a code (the update) which will repair problems and flaws in a system/program.

And this article is the key reason why I use Linux… no broken updates.

1 votes

Tina S

I wonder, what makes Linux users read articles about Windows?

Anyway, I agree with the first part of your comment, Jerica. Updates take weeks to develop and it’s sad when they are deployed without having been tested properly.

1 votes

etim

Tina, it’s sort of like a successful adult, having grown up in dire poverty, still likes to occasionally drive through the slums he was able to escape.

1 votes
Reply

Caner Turhan Alp

Thank you very much Tina. It works now. :)

0 votes

Tina S

Hoping it would help someone is the reason I wrote this article. Thanks for the shout-out, Caner! :)

1 votes
Reply

Animesh

Spent half the day reinstalling windows, drivers and all my programs. Definitely making a recovery usb after this.

0 votes
0 votes
Reply

Partha S

The updates have not caused any problem so far.Should I uninstall?

1 votes

Animesh

I did not get any problems in the several days before the crash either. I suggest you uninstall.

0 votes

Tina S

Yes, I would also recommend to uninstall these updates.

They were optional, not addressing security vulnerabilities, so they are also safe to uninstall.

Microsoft will re-issue them once they fixed them.

1 votes
Reply

JADsHome

I’m glad you posted this – it’s confirmed my suspicions that the august update had introduced a gremin !

I’m using Win7 and up until this August update my Creative X-Fi sound card was working fine and dandy. … until after the update – when it just hung and squeeled for about 30 seconds then gave a BSoD. The error suggested a driver conflict with the network card. Not something it had ever complained about after I had done a complete reinstall about 2 months prior. With no issues until this time and nothing updated other than the Windows patches it could only have been the august update. After the reboot – no sound – just an unrecognised multimedia device for which MS Update could find no match. After a quick (quiet) scoot around the net, a few posts had suggested either moving the card to another slot or completely uninstalling the Creative softward and drivers and doing a reinstall of said software. I chose both options, rebooted and Windows recognised the card and I was up and running again – until the next reboot when about 10 mins into the session – up came the scrambled sound closely followed by the BSoD – and back into the loop. This time the error was a little less descriptive, so I ended up giving up and taking the card out and am currently using the rubbish quality on board CMedia CM6501 chip – but at least I have sound – and no adverse affects since the issues with the Creative card. So thankyou M$ – for making my experience as exciting as life should be – oh and thanks for wasting 3 hours of my life !

JAD

0 votes

Tina S

Have you tried to uninstall the August Update and re-install your card? I’d be curious to hear whether that fixes the issue.

Did you check the Windows error log? It could also be a physical issue with the card (heat damage, random hardware failure), not related to software or drive conflicts.

Good luck!

1 votes
Reply

Lex Thomas

My PC was ‘bitten’ by the update also. Luckily in my case, the System Restore function worked for me. I was concerned that the update was just affecting me (potentially due to a hardware issue) since I was on a relatively new PC. Thanks for the article to let me know there are others with this issue also.

I am a software developer and I know that adequate testing can be difficult and sometimes even impossible. It frequently takes significantly more time to test a release than it does to develop it but corporations typically don’t allocate enough quality assurance time and/or resources. Also, complicating this is that no one can predict all configurations that require testing.

As much as I like Linux and Mac OS/X, there really is no viable alternative to Windows for many people. The availability of Enterprise level software makes Windows a necessity for many people. These arguments of Linux vs. Windows in the comments accomplish nothing but to illustrate a misunderstanding of the workforce.

2 votes

dragonmouth

“I am a software developer and I know that adequate testing can be difficult and sometimes even impossible.”
Depends on management’s definition of “adequate”. What is “adequate” to a developer, is “time wasting and unnecessary” to management. But then no software can be completely purged of bugs. Even years after going into production, users still find new bugs. Of course there is more of them then there is of us so it is easier for users to find the bugs. :-)

“The availability of Enterprise level software makes Windows a necessity for many people.”
That excuse is wearing thin. Many enterprises have switched to Linux. Apparently they have found sufficient number of applications of sufficient quality to ditch Windows. Granted it is only a small percentage of all the enterprises but it is steadily growing. I think many enterprises keep using Windows because of corporate inertia. Others do not want to give up on their investment in Microsoft products.

0 votes

Tina S

Thank you for the balanced comment, Lex and the discussion, dragonmouth. It’s great to hear input from so many different perspectives!

1 votes

Lex Thomas

Inertia is a real problem — especially for my organization of over 20,000+ employees where a minor change requires a substantial investment in time and training. We tend to be very heterogeneous in our architecture using a wide variety of software on many platforms including Linux, Windows, and Mac. We pick what we feel to be the right platform for the specific application that we need. In some cases, these applications are only available on a single platform. We use tons of third-party software including Atlassian Jira, HP Quality Center, SAP Business Objects, JAVA, Microsoft Visual Studio plus lots of specialized development libraries that have no non-Windows equivalent. We will probably never abandon any of these platforms as long as there exists a best-of -breed application for that system.

1 votes
Reply

Abraham Koshie

Using an OS other than Windows is always welcome, but some of the latest hardware gets supported by Linux only a few months or even a year later. This is why some people are forced to rely on Windows!

0 votes
Reply

Guy

Did the last M$ update crash my box? U bet!

Solution: Hello Linux Mint 17, yeah baby!!!

What took me so long…

1 votes
Reply

cesar

I am really tire of Reading Linux diehard scream, shout and bang their head against Microsoft OS, office software or whatever Microsoft do….if they are happy with their OS I can live with it, but stop using this or those fórums to convince us the Linux operating system is the computing panacea, if you want to use Linux go for it but to think that is the SOLUTION for all people in the world is a gross misconception.

0 votes

Lex Thomas

cesar — I agree with you 100%.

0 votes

dragonmouth

cesar, I agree with you.

If Window Fans are happy with their OS, I can live with it, but stop using this or other fórums to convince us the Windows operating system is the computing panacea, If you want to use Windows, go for it but to think that is the SOLUTION for all people in the world is a gross misconception.

1 votes

Guy

I don’t see where I’m referring to “all” people. In fact I couldn’t care less about “all” people.

Linux Mint is good for me.

If you want to stick to Windows, that ‘s your choice & your problem.

G

0 votes
Reply

Margaret P

I’ve got no problems with the August update, because I’m no longer getting any updates! I’m still trying to get the Windows 8.1 Update from April. Having tried everything I can find online and suggested by Microsoft I’m starting to wonder if there is a fix. Unfortunately if you upgraded from Windows 8 to 8.1 via the online download you don’t have the option to refresh or restore your computer as you don’t have any 8.1 media. I may just have to do without Windows Updates – and with what has happened with the August update, that may not be a bad thing!

0 votes

Frank K.

Margaret I am in the same boat as you…tried more than I care to say to “upgrade” from 8 to 8.1 only to find a different error msg each time…now it says it cannot update my system reserved files, but offers no solutions or even hints of what I should do.
I did apply Aug. updates to my Win 7 desktop and 6 hours later a BSOD (on a system I built myself 3 years ago and have never had a BSOD on before. I did a system restore to before the updates and have been fine since.
So I am just going to stay with 8 until something better comes along…I already dual boot Win 7 and Mint on my desktop and they meet my needs just fine.

0 votes
Reply

Mike

Microsoft does it again. Window 8 is a step backwards. The ACER tablet is worthless with this operating system.

1 votes
Reply

Jan Hall

I run Windows 7 64-bit and I wish this article had come out a week ago. After installing all the offered updates last week, on reboot my computer would not come up in Windows or Safe Mode, and System Recovery (even trying multiple restore points) would not work. I wound up restoring to a Windows backup that was a few days old and having to figure out where I left off in QuickBooks. Thanks for the read… next time I’ll know to see what I can find on my laptop before restoring an old backup on my desktop.

0 votes
Reply

Webtek

Need I say it.. MAC

0 votes
Reply

Nats

Great article indeed. My notebook is hanging a lot, Should I uninstall these updates?

0 votes

Tina S

Yes Nats. Uninstalling the four updates listed above is safe. Microsoft also stopped deploying them.

1 votes
Reply

Dane M

I rolled back to 8.0 on a clean install from the disc i made when I bought it and I’m planing on staying there until I buy 9.0 and install it from a disc i burn or buy.

I don’t have time for these interim experiments.

0 votes
Reply

Tony

My update shows their are four windows x64 updates available. Which ones should be avoided :
Update for Windows 8.1 for x64-based Systems (KB2962409)
Update for Windows 8.1 for x64-based Systems (KB2971239)
Update for Windows 8.1 for x64-based Systems (KB2979500)
Update for Windows 8.1 for x64-based Systems (KB2981580)

0 votes

Tina S

These all appear to be fine. None of them were identified as culprits in the wake of the August Update debacle. Microsoft pulled the troublesome updates.

0 votes
Reply

mike

I have an HP Envy m4 netbook. HP’s solution? they re installed the Win 8.0 bios and told me never to do any updates! my original win 7 computer had an issue so a bigbox store forced to give me a new one, but with win 8. never liked it.

0 votes
Reply

rkr3

I’ve got the KB2982791 and KB2975719 updates installed (which are in the ‘taboo’ list); however, my system (an HP Envy laptop on Win 8.1 Pro 64-bit) is running fine, with no problems so far.

As all the forums are advising to remove these updates (even if they’re not causing problems), I figured I should remove them. However, if I go into ‘Installed Updates’ and highlight either of these two updates, the ‘Install’ and ‘Change’ options disappear (I think maybe I used Disk Cleanup to remove System Files, which removes the uninstallers for Windows Updates).

Like I said, I’m not having any problems due to these updates so far; but if they start acting up sometime in the future, I’m out of options! Any ideas, anyone?

0 votes
Reply

jay sterling

I try to used easybcd because I wanted to boot from USB but it didn´t work and my computer won´t start. I have a Ultrabook Fujitsu Lifebook UH572 (No CD drive) and I deleted the original operating system on the C drive win8.1. Now I´m left with a boot order that includes unbuntu and a windows set-up that have missing files. I burnt ISO that I got from MS Dreamsparks and they work perfectly fine on other PCs at home that don´t make use of easy bcd. I can´t access the external cd drive through the bios.

0 votes
Reply

rika

Has anyone out there have a solution for the dreaded BSOD on Windows Vista?

0 votes

dragonmouth

Tell us more about it and we will try to help.

0 votes
Reply

oldredned

And to think I gave up my beloved Windows XP for all this!

0 votes
Reply

Dave

My computer started to perform the infinite reboot loop after the August 14th update and I thought I was in deep trouble. Simply uninstalling KB2982791 resolved the problem. Thanks.

0 votes
Reply

Alan T

Just a comment from a different perspective. Here we are running an expensive and highly protected operating system which as a part of the normal and pre installed practice updates. The update does not do what it should, it effectively breaks your system and the solution is “fix it yourself”. Fix it yourself! If you has washing machine under warranty that stop working would you be happy with a phone call that said “unplug the power, get a Philips screwdriver etc…
I know this may be likened to the old ford car analogy but it is reasonable to ask why we the customers, have to fix the problem caused by the manufacturer supplying a problematic update. What is even worse is if they know what causes the problem and expect us to fix it! The article says “crashes are caused by xxxx” well Microsoft, why didn’t you fix it instead of telling your customer to do the job for you? Never mind the excuse that is is only a specific set of circumstances, feeble at best but you know what we have on our systems, you monitor our systems so it is only fare and reasonable that prior to installing an update you check our systems for conflicts and ask us if we wish to have you fix the conflict and update of not install the update. Of course that may cost money should increased resource be needed but as you move to systems that rely on you more and more (say Office 365) is this not the way forward.
I am very pro Microsoft but they have, in my opinion, an obligation to their customers which I feel has been allowed so slip. Please look after your customers.

0 votes
Reply

Alan T

Sorry for the typos in the first post, here corrected, may make more sense.

Just a comment from a different perspective. Here we are running an expensive and highly protected operating system which as a part of the normal and pre installed practice updates. The update does not do what it should, it effectively breaks your system and the solution is “fix it yourself”. Fix it yourself! If you has washing machine under warranty that stop working would you be happy with a phone call that said “unplug the power, get a Philips screwdriver etc…
I know this may be likened to the old ford car analogy but it is reasonable to ask why we the customers, have to fix a problem caused by the manufacturer supplying a problematic update. What is even worse is if they know what causes the problem and then expect us to fix it! The article says “crashes are caused by xxxx” well Microsoft, why didn’t you fix it instead of telling your customer to do the job for you? Never mind the excuse that is is only a specific set of circumstances, feeble at best! You know what we have on our systems, you monitor our systems so it is only fair and reasonable that prior to installing an update you check our systems for conflicts and ask us if we wish to have you fix the conflict and update or not install the update. Of course that may cost money should increased resource be needed but as you move to systems that rely on you more and more (say Office 365) is this not the way forward?
I am very pro Microsoft but they have, in my opinion, an obligation to their customers which I feel has been allowed so slip. Please look after your customers.

0 votes
Reply

Victor O

The only time Windows Update has actually given me problems was when I forced my computer to shut down whilst updating Windows 7 to SP1. Then, I ran SFC to fix most of the corruptions before system restoring.

0 votes
Reply

J. Anthony Carter

I started out with 4 “Updates” that needed to be installed. For some reason, no matter what I did I couldn’t get them to install. I got continuous error messages telling me to click such-and-such an error code to find out what to do. More than half the time the “Error Code” number wasn’t even available in the window that came up. I have gone through using FixIt and System Update corrector software that Windows had me go to. Nothing has worked. Not deleting the SoftwareDistribution packages. Not resetting Update, NOTHING.
Now I still have the icon in my task bar but whenever I place my cursor over it it says I have new updates available. I click on it and Windows Update comes up saying “Check for Updates” I do and it comes back with a red window instead of a yellow one (the vert. bar and shield on the left-hand side of the Update window) and says ” Windows could not search for new updates” with an error code of 80248014, which doesn’t show up in the window when you click on the “To get help with this error” link. I’m just so freaking tired of Windows and Microsoft. I want my XP Professional back… IT FREAKING WORKED!!!!

0 votes
Reply

Rika

Hi Dragon,
My laptop has Windows Vista and just recently the screen started to fade into psychedelic colours… I could for a time work in safe mode but even that is starting to play up.
I do have an anti-virus installed and I have also tried uninstalling everything recently installed but it seems to be getting worse. My laptop is an Acer and is six years old…
Is it trying to tell me that it is time to buy a new one?
It has always given me such great service it would be a pity to bin it…
Hope you can help…

0 votes
Reply

Dan Murano

Update # 2993651 causes Windows Update to fail when checking for updates. First I did a system restore to mid-August, then reinstalled the updates today on 8/31/2014. Same problem – Windows Update failure. I finally went into Programs and Features and uninstalled update #2993651 and now it is working again. I have also hidden it. Wondering why they would keep this out there if it causes known problems.

Your comment