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video compatibilityWorldwide Internet connection speeds used to be the biggest problem when it came to distributing videos in the virtual world. The dial-up modem speed limited the web to only text and minimal graphics. Now however, downloading gigabytes of files is no problem to web users.

But today’s high speed Internet brings a new problem to the video distribution world: video compatibility. There are many ways and devices that you can use to access video on the net but each requires a specific format of video Digital Video Formats and Video Conversion Explained Digital Video Formats and Video Conversion Explained Read More . If you have videos that you want to share with the world, transcoding them to be compatible with all the devices and browsers out there could be a very tedious process.


Meet vid.ly, a web service that promises to do all the hard work for you, so you can concentrate on producing great videos to share.

One Link To Rule Them All

The basic workflow is this. You provide a video, vid.ly will transcode it into several versions, store the results on their server, then give you the link to the video for you to share. Vid.ly will detect every browser and every device that visits the link and then matches them with the appropriate video format.

You can see on the table the various formats that are supported by vid.ly. Not only browsers and mobile devices, vid.ly also supports video streaming to game consoles.

video compatibility

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Before you can use vid.ly, you will need an invitation code as the service is currently in beta. The developer has been kind enough to give MakeUseOf readers an unlimited invitation code (thanks, Jeff!). The code is HNY2011. Just enter that code into the box provided on the main vid.ly webpage.

make video compatible

Then after getting access to the service, click “Start” on the right.

make video compatible

You will be asked to locate the video that you want to convert. You can provide the link to videos stored on the web – either in FTP or HTTP, Amazon S3 services or another cloud service. You can also upload any video stored inside your hard drive. Click “Next” and that’s it.

make video compatible

The next step is to wait. Provide vid.ly with your email address so that you can be notified via email when your video is ready. Click “Finish” after writing down the address.

software video compatibility

If you want to know the progress of your video conversion, you can monitor the progress status box where the service logs each and every step along the way.

software video compatibility

If you choose to upload video from your hard drive, you can also see how vid.ly utilizes almost all the screen area as the uploading progress bar.

software video compatibility

Sharing The One Link

After the process is finished, you will get a video link. You can share this one link to your friends without worrying about the technicalities.

There are many sharing methods supported by vid.ly including several major social networks.

04a Share  Social

If you prefer to share the link directly to your friends’ mobile, you can send them a text message by entering their phone number and clicking the “send sms” button.

05b Direct Mobile

You can also embed the video to your blog or website simply by copying and pasting the provided script. If needed, you can change the video size by proportionally modifying the width and height tags in the script.

05c Embed Code

For those who still utilize legacy flash players on their site, vid.ly also has your back by providing a method to do direct FLA plays.

05d Direct FLA

After The Links

Aside from making your own videos available, you can also utilize vid.ly to transcode interesting online videos that you stumble onto so that those videos are also available for your other devices and can be shared with your friends. All you need is the direct address of the video (the one that ends with the video format). Unfortunately, this method does not work with YouTube videos.

Please note that the success rate of the transcoding process during my experiment is not 100%. Maybe it’s because the service is still in the beta stage. Hopefully everything will be tuned to perfection for the final stage when they open their doors to the general public.

I would like to point out one other thing. Even though the invitation code I provided above ( HNY2011 ) should be enough for everybody, there’s the possibility that the code will be expired. So I would like to ask for help from those of you who have already got in to share your own invitation code using the comments below (you can view your invitation code by emailing them to yourself).

video compatibility

After you have tried vid.ly, please share your thoughts and opinions about the video compatibility service using the comments below.

  1. Anonymous
    March 16, 2011 at 9:39 am

    Nice read, seems cool, would like to have a try.
    And now Im working on my videoCompatible With All Devices With iFunia video converter pro, but this way worth to be a try!

  2. Jeemy
    March 16, 2011 at 10:39 am

    Nice read, seems cool, would like to have a try.
    And now Im working on my videoCompatible With All Devices With iFunia video converter pro, but this way worth to be a try!

  3. Jeff Malkin
    March 15, 2011 at 11:33 pm

    Jeffry, thanks for the article. My name is Jeff Malkin, president at Encoding.com (provider of Vid.ly). In response to the comments:

    -- Vid.ly will be both a free and paid service. The free service is exactly what is available today (behind the "beta" wall which will be opened up very soon) - the ability to use the web interface to create as many Vid.ly URLs (up to 1GB per video) as you like. The paid service will have many value-added features including the ability to integrate the API into your workflow / application.

    -- Vid.ly is not intended to be a destination. That's the biggest difference to say a YouTube, Vimeo, etc... The intention is to ensure that videos can be consumed on any device or browser.

    Cheers,
    - jeff

  4. Jeff Malkin
    March 16, 2011 at 12:33 am

    Jeffry, thanks for the article. My name is Jeff Malkin, president at Encoding.com (provider of Vid.ly). In response to the comments:

    -- Vid.ly will be both a free and paid service. The free service is exactly what is available today (behind the "beta" wall which will be opened up very soon) - the ability to use the web interface to create as many Vid.ly URLs (up to 1GB per video) as you like. The paid service will have many value-added features including the ability to integrate the API into your workflow / application.

    -- Vid.ly is not intended to be a destination. That's the biggest difference to say a YouTube, Vimeo, etc... The intention is to ensure that videos can be consumed on any device or browser.

    Cheers,
    - jeff

  5. Marie
    March 15, 2011 at 7:15 pm

    Hi, I think this is very interesting as well.. but same question.. will there be a cost and how much? I am curious to try it.. my question is, what is the difference between this and Youtube?

  6. Thehoodnerd
    March 15, 2011 at 6:14 pm

    This is very interesting! So will it always be a free service?

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