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Last week, inspired by a US court case, we asked you all if you would read your partner’s email Would You Read Your Partner's Email? [MakeUseOf Poll] Would You Read Your Partner's Email? [MakeUseOf Poll] Read More . It turns out most of you would consider doing so for a good reason.

We collected 243 votes and the division was incredibly close: 38% might read their partner’s email; 34% would never read their partner’s email; while 28% would definitely read their partner’s email.

Full results and this week’s poll after the jump.


As you can see, there’s almost an equal amount of votes on each option. Incredibly close!

This week’s poll question is: How Do You Keep Track Of Your Passwords?

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There are so many different password managers Password Manager Battle Royale: Who Will End Up On Top? Password Manager Battle Royale: Who Will End Up On Top? Read More out there. Often people new to the concept have no idea which one to trust. So, let’s help them decide. Which password manager do you use?

No doubt you tried a few password managers before you settled on your favourite. Let us know why your choice is the best in the comments!

  1. Njb249
    February 26, 2011 at 8:49 am

    I use Password Dragon

  2. John
    February 21, 2011 at 8:38 am

    I have been using Passpack for last three years. Excellent program. It has a One-click login which is pretty cool. It is free for the first 100 entries and about $10 for more. Great support as well. Read all about it at http://www.passpack.com

  3. John
    February 21, 2011 at 9:38 am

    I have been using Passpack for last three years. Excellent program. It has a One-click login which is pretty cool. It is free for the first 100 entries and about $10 for more. Great support as well. Read all about it at http://www.passpack.com

  4. Andrew
    February 19, 2011 at 8:24 pm

    For some, I use memory - but for other sites I use a password generator which uses pictures to create passwords. Find it at Pixelock.com

  5. Andrew
    February 19, 2011 at 9:24 pm

    For some, I use memory - but for other sites I use a password generator which uses pictures to create passwords. Find it at Pixelock.com

  6. clow
    February 19, 2011 at 12:11 pm

    I use opera's password manager

  7. Aibek
    February 19, 2011 at 6:33 am

    That what I do now as well and use the same password for less important
    sites. For stuff like email and banking I use randomly generated ones.

  8. Todd Clay
    February 19, 2011 at 5:40 am

    I did that too for a very long time until I watched a show on quickly you could be exposed so I started keeping levels of passwords. Low security or I don't really care sites get a similar password while sites that hold confidential info are each given a high quality password randomly generated.

    When sites started each having their own password requirements I could no longer keep them in my head, at that point I had to go to a manager. I have also added a key scrambler which I usually forget to turn on when needed and I've begun some experimenting with free VPN's.

  9. dmarie
    February 17, 2011 at 1:03 am

    excel spreadsheet! have to clean out the old junk every once in a while though. save it under a cryptic name that does not include 'passwords'

  10. Don
    February 16, 2011 at 3:08 am

    My passwords are all based on things that are significant to me where I can create hints that are clear to me but are meaningless to anyone else in my life (or strangers). Then I can keep the hints in plain sight.

  11. Anonymous
    February 15, 2011 at 11:59 pm

    I use Steganos LockNote it is a similar to Notepad but it is password protected with AES 256bit encryption technology. And it is FREE BTW.
    http://www.steganos.com/us/products/for-free/locknote/overview/

  12. swftech
    February 16, 2011 at 12:59 am

    I use Steganos LockNote it is a similar to Notepad but it is password protected with AES 256bit encryption technology. And it is FREE BTW.
    http://www.steganos.com/us/pro...

  13. Aibek
    February 15, 2011 at 6:32 am

    MakeUseOf actually has a bunch of articles on password techniques:

    How To Create Strong Passwords That You Can Remember Easily
    http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/h...

    How To Create A Good Password That You Will Not Forget
    http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/c...

    PasswordBird: Create Strong Passwords that are Easy to Remember
    http://www.makeuseof.com/dir/p...

    check them out

  14. Guest
    February 15, 2011 at 3:46 am

    Password Agent 2.5.1 by Moon Software

  15. pceasies
    February 15, 2011 at 1:52 am

    Anyone every try md5'ing the website name and using, say, the first 16 characters?

  16. John Hauxwell
    February 14, 2011 at 10:39 pm

    I use LastPass: So easy to use and accessible across all platforms - a winner for me :)

  17. Leland G Whitlock
    February 14, 2011 at 8:35 pm

    I use Sticky Password on Windows. I also go from memory some of the time and use SplashID on my Palm some of the time too. Now that I finally have a Android phone I will probably convert my SplashID database to that platform but for the most part it will continue to be a combination effort.

  18. Max Audet
    February 14, 2011 at 5:45 pm

    LastPass FTW !! It's awesome.

  19. Anonymous
    February 14, 2011 at 5:11 pm

    What about Keychain Access (installed on every Mac as part of the OS)? I love it - simple to use and almost any app supports it (and some save data in it).

  20. Lou Tech
    February 14, 2011 at 4:49 pm

    I suspect you're going to get a lot of answers based on "this is what I would do if I didn't use the same one everywhere." The Gawker Media hack illuminated the horrible security so many people use.

  21. Imnot Telling
    February 14, 2011 at 4:02 pm

    Some of my most important ones are in my memory. Some of the least important are all the same. For most I use mSecure on the iPhone and Mac as well as using a master password in firefox. I tried a bunch of different iPhone password apps and I liked the combination of flexibility, customization, and simplicity of mSecure. The others I tried were too rigid or too cumbersome.

  22. Anonymous
    February 14, 2011 at 2:40 pm

    I've used the same password for nearly 10 years now, same user name too. Never worry about anything...

    • Aibek
      February 15, 2011 at 5:33 am

      I have been doing the same thing for a long time until someone hacked my email one day. I would strong advice against this.

      • Todd Clay
        February 19, 2011 at 4:40 am

        I did that too for a very long time until I watched a show on quickly you could be exposed so I started keeping levels of passwords. Low security or I don't really care sites get a similar password while sites that hold confidential info are each given a high quality password randomly generated.

        When sites started each having their own password requirements I could no longer keep them in my head, at that point I had to go to a manager. I have also added a key scrambler which I usually forget to turn on when needed and I've begun some experimenting with free VPN's.

        • Aibek
          February 19, 2011 at 5:33 am

          That what I do now as well and use the same password for less important
          sites. For stuff like email and banking I use randomly generated ones.

  23. Angela Alcorn
    February 14, 2011 at 2:17 pm

    LastPass actually bought Xmarks and is now controlling all of the Xmarks passwords. http://blog.xmarks.com/?p=2033

    New users are directed straight to LastPass, but maybe there's still people on the old Xmarks system. I thought they'd been integrated already.

  24. curts
    February 14, 2011 at 12:08 pm

    How could you leave out Xmarks?! But I don't use the Firefox/Xmarks combination for my really important passwords, i.e. bank accounts, etc.

    • Angela Alcorn
      February 14, 2011 at 1:17 pm

      LastPass actually bought Xmarks and is now controlling all of the Xmarks passwords. http://blog.xmarks.com/?p=2033

      New users are directed straight to LastPass, but maybe there's still people on the old Xmarks system. I thought they'd been integrated already.

    • Todd Clay
      February 19, 2011 at 4:34 am

      I feel a bit uncomfortable storing my passwords on an internet site even with encryption. It seems to me to be adding one more potential place to be hacked. Also, if the site were inaccessible for a time I would be a very unhappy camper.

  25. Rick996
    February 14, 2011 at 12:05 pm

    I use LastPass so even I don't know my passwords. Before that I used Darn!Passwords.

  26. Jack Cola
    February 14, 2011 at 11:46 am

    I have to vote on memory for this one, however all my passwords are all unique.

    I have a default password, and I use characters of the URL and insert it into the default password to make my unique password.

  27. Anonymous
    February 14, 2011 at 11:18 am

    I've been using Roboform for ohh at least 8 years & still happy with it. But I don't save my most secure p-words to anything but memory like for my bank and similar.

    • Todd Clay
      February 19, 2011 at 4:31 am

      Roboform has been my choice for several years. I started with another one I think it was called GoGoData or something and it was discontinued or wasn't working at certain sites and that's when I had found Sxipper and Roboform. Sxipper at the time was very disfunctional and I quickly moved to Roboform which seems to be very good at even catching the quirky sites that don't always work well like those with pop-up logons or windows type security and now they've added in programs outside of the browser like Quicken and sidebar gadgets. I'd imagine, although I haven't had a reason to find out yet, that it supports windows disk mounts too.

  28. Jack Cola
    February 14, 2011 at 12:46 pm

    I have to vote on memory for this one, however all my passwords are all unique.

    I have a default password, and I use characters of the URL and insert it into the default password to make my unique password.

  29. D. Gates
    February 14, 2011 at 9:31 am

    I have a system for generating passwords based on the domain name. "I just use the same password" is the closest, though inaccurate. It's not memory, since I don't need to remember anything. In fact, since one step involves a spatial transformation I don't
    even KNOW most of my passwords, just how to enter them.

  30. D. Gates
    February 14, 2011 at 10:31 am

    I have a system for generating passwords based on the domain name. "I just use the same password" is the closest, though inaccurate. It's not memory, since I don't need to remember anything. In fact, since one step involves a spatial transformation I don't
    even KNOW most of my passwords, just how to enter them.

  31. tedthetrumpet
    February 14, 2011 at 7:27 am

    I keep my passwords in a plain text file stored on a small disk image encrypted with TrueCrypt

    • Mark O'Neill
      February 14, 2011 at 3:00 pm

      I use the Truecrypt-encrypted text file too. Very simple and I like simple.

  32. Anonymous
    February 14, 2011 at 4:24 am

    There should be an option for "Memory"..
    I keep every password in my brain. I make it a point to use different passwords for different accounts, as well as not SO different so as to confuse between them.

    • Angela Alcorn
      February 14, 2011 at 5:23 am

      Good point. Will add it.

    • Todd Clay
      February 19, 2011 at 4:24 am

      There was an option - "other". I did this too for a while but found that sites started to require certain characters and what would work for one wouldn't work for another.

  33. vin369
    February 14, 2011 at 5:24 am

    There should be an option for "Memory"..
    I keep every password in my brain. I make it a point to use different passwords for different accounts, as well as not SO different so as to confuse between them.

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