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I have friends who are active on Twitter but ignore Facebook. Some are the opposite. And then there are those who forget about their social networks, so digital communication with them is restricted to email. But sometimes, I need to reach all of them.

For a normal person, this probably means typing a message in Gmail, copying it and heading to Facebook to paste it then, and then go to Twitter and do that one more time. But for the smart Mac user, Swifty ($1.99) is the quickest way to get this done.

In fact, it’s the quickest way to send emails, messages on Facebook or DMs on Twitter — and you’ll never have to open a browser window.

Quick Messaging For Keyboard Lovers

Swifty is a neat little app that sits quietly in the Mac Menu Bar (psst, here’s how to reduce Menu Bar clutter 5 Ways To Reduce Menu Bar Clutter [Mac] 5 Ways To Reduce Menu Bar Clutter [Mac] We've covered some Great Tips and Tools For a Clean and Minimalist Mac Desktop before. This time, I'll be focusing on specifically the menu bar. Due to my small 13" MacBook Pro screen, which has... Read More ). When you need to quickly send an email, tap its icon or hit the customizable keyboard shortcut and you’ll get a pop-out tray with three fields: To, Subject (unless you choose Twitter) and Body.

Swifty-For-Mac-Different-People-Different-Networks

Before you get to that you will need to set up Swifty with your Gmail, Twitter and Facebook accounts, which only takes a few minutes. You will obviously have to grant Swifty permission to post on those networks, and it also asks to read your contact lists. At any point, you can turn off one of these services through the Settings menu.

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Swifty is entirely a keyboard-based app. I’d recommend keeping your hotkey as Cmd+Shift+M since “M” is easy to remember for “mail” or “messaging”. The app consolidates your contact lists across Gmail, Twitter and Facebook, so the “To” field starts auto-updating suggestions as you type.

Swifty-For-Twitter-One-Contact-Different-IDs

If you have the same contact in all three networks it’s easy to tell them apart by a little icon next to the contact name, indicating which service it’s from. The contact names also stay true to how they’re shown in the original service.

There doesn’t seem to be any limit to how many contacts you can add in one message, and the length of the message is only limited by the particular service you’re using. It also unlocks the ability to send DMs to multiple Twitter contacts MultiDM: Send Direct Message To Multiple Twitter Users MultiDM: Send Direct Message To Multiple Twitter Users Read More , which Twitter doesn’t offer.

By default, Swifty also appends a signature that denotes the message was sent via Swifty, but you can change or remove that through the Settings.

Where Swifty Falls Short

Swifty is great for sending quick and short messages or emails. I’ll admit, most of my messages fall squarely in that category—I’m sure if you analysed your own usage, you would find a lot of emails with only a couple of sentences. For such, Swifty is fantastic.

Swifty-For-Mac-Same-Person-Different-IDs

But if you need anything more, this app isn’t the first port of call. Swifty doesn’t support attachments of any sort, which is a pity – you’ll still need to rely on other ways to mail large attachments 8 Ways To Email Large Attachments 8 Ways To Email Large Attachments Email was never made for large file attachments. Many email servers won’t even accept emails with attachments over 10 MB in size. To send large files via email, you’ll need to upload your email attachments... Read More . You can also kiss goodbye to sending that hilarious GIF to your Twitter followers too. There’s also no support for emoji, foiling any ability I have of showing emotion.

Swifty-For-Mac-Settings

Unfortunately, Swifty also supports only a single account for each service. I really hope the developers add multiple account support soon as right now, it means you only get to use either your personal or your work account with the app.

Finally, Swifty works only with Gmail for email—no other email service is supported, not even Mac’s built-in Mail app. Pity.

Worth It Or Not?

If it was a free app, Swifty would be a no-brainer. But since it costs $1.99, I would think twice about how much I need it before buying it. The app’s aim is speed and convenience, so think about two things:

  1. How often do you need to send an email, a Twitter DM or a Facebook message? If the answer is “at least once every hour” then Swifty is for you.
  2. If the answer is less than once every hour but still quite frequently, then think about how often you have those apps open in your browser tabs, and whether quicker access than opening your browser is worth $1.99.

Download: Swifty for Mac ($1.99)

What do you think of Switfy? Any alternatives you can recommend?

  1. Matthew H
    February 10, 2014 at 3:42 pm

    My word, this is amazing. Excellent find Mihir!

    • Mihir Patkar
      February 10, 2014 at 5:21 pm

      I know, right?

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