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In August, a British man was sent to jail after defrauding two women of over £300,000 ($455,300) through online dating sites. He had convinced them that he was a diplomat and that a US marine general had fallen in love with them, causing one woman to pawn jewelry, empty her life savings, sell her car, and take out loans to help this general move to the UK. She got nothing.

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In 2011, the Internet Crime Complaint Center estimated that the online dating scamming “industry” was worth over $50 million, but it’s likely much higher than that, due to the difficulty of making a good estimate. People are often ashamed to come forward and admit that they’ve been duped. It’s not a good feeling to have been taken advantage of, and a scheme that’s so obvious in hindsight is even harder to admit to.

Don’t become one of these numbers! If you date online, take precautions to protect yourself. Here are six things to keep in mind to help you spot and avoid scammers on online dating sites.

Know if You’re at Risk

Anyone can be the target and victim of these scams—men, women, young, old, gay, straight, white, black, Asian, Hispanic… no one is off limits. But the FBI states that women who are “over 40, divorced, widowed, and/or disabled” are prime targets for scammers. If you fall into this category, be especially wary of people that you meet through dating websites. Online dating can be difficult for women Here's What Dating Sites Are Like If You're A Woman Here's What Dating Sites Are Like If You're A Woman As an experiment I set up accounts on three of the more popular free dating websites, then spoke to some women about their experiences. Here’s what happened. Read More , and scammers only add to the problem, so be vigilant when you’re meeting new people.

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The AARP also says that seniors are a common target of these scams. Again, both men and women can and have fallen victim to online dating scammers, but women tend to be targeted more aggressively. Interestingly, the AARP says that men fall victim to these scams more often, but that women are more likely to report the scam.

Profile Warning Signs

The profiles of online dating scammers can exhibit some clear signs that something is off—you just need to know what to look for. Most scammers choose victims that are older than they are, for example, so if someone who is significantly younger than you says that they’re interested, it could be cause for concern. Of course, just because someone is younger doesn’t mean that they’re a scammer; it’s just something to keep in mind.

Scammers also often list themselves as widowed (especially with a child), self-employed, or working overseas. They might also say that they live near you, but that they’re away; they could be in another country on a trip or for work, but they’ll almost certainly be somewhere far away where you can’t meet them.

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The photos used by scammers can also clue you in that something is off. If someone sends you a message and says they’d like to get to know you, save a copy of their picture and use Google’s reverse image search Check Out Some More Uses Of A Reverse Image Search Using TinEye [Chrome] Check Out Some More Uses Of A Reverse Image Search Using TinEye [Chrome] Image recognition is getting better by the day. Perhaps, that’s why we keep talking about it so much. The reverse search engine that usually gets most of the clicks is TinEye. We didn’t miss out... Read More  to see if anyone has posted about that photo being used for a scam. If that image shows up on other profiles with different names, you should be suspicious. It’s possible that it’s someone looking for an affair on a dating site 3 Reasons Why The Ashley Madison Hack Is A Serious Affair 3 Reasons Why The Ashley Madison Hack Is A Serious Affair The Internet seems ecstatic about the Ashley Madison hack, with millions of adulterers' and potential adulterers' details hacked and released online, with articles outing individuals found in the data dump. Hilarious, right? Not so fast. Read More , but it could also be a scammer. If you receive other photos, and anything seems off, be wary.

Early Warning Signs to Watch For

Even if someone’s profile looks legit, there are other signs to keep an eye out for, especially during the beginning of your communication. For example, scammers will often ask you to communicate with them outside of the dating site—via email, through Facebook, or even on Skype. These methods give them better access to you and can help them gather additional information that they can use to con you.

Don’t fall for it: there’s nothing wrong with staying in touch via the dating site.

Scammers are good at being charming and saying all the right things—and they start it fast. They have a lot of victims to get through, so they’re going to try to move things along as quickly as possible. They’ll hit you with the full force of their charm; they’ll say sweet things, compliment you a lot, and talk about how perfect you are for each other within the first couple weeks. Think about if you would find it strange for someone to be acting like this if you just met in real life. If someone was expressing over-the-top love and passion within a couple weeks, you’d be worried.

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Early on in a courting relationship, you’ll probably ask a lot of questions, even basic ones like “how tall are you?” or “what do you do for a living?” If the person you’re talking to is avoiding these basic questions, that should be a big red flag. Many scammers will be prepared to answer these and even more complicated questions, but if you can’t get answers from a suitor, you should be suspicious.

Communicative Issues

While there are online dating scammers from all over the world, a significant number of them come from non-English-first-language countries, which means that sometimes there will be communicative markers that indicate your suitor isn’t who they say they are. If their profile says they’ve lived in Ohio their entire lives, but they’re using non-standard English, or have notably poor grammar, that could be a warning sign (think of the kinds of errors you’d see in a Nigerian scam email Do Nigerian Scam Emails Hide A Terrible Secret? [Opinion] Do Nigerian Scam Emails Hide A Terrible Secret? [Opinion] Another day, another spam email drops into my inbox, somehow working its way around the Windows Live spam filter that does such a good job of protecting my eyes from all of the other unsolicited... Read More ).

This can become especially evident in an email conversation 5 Examples To Help You Spot A Fraud Or Fake Email 5 Examples To Help You Spot A Fraud Or Fake Email The shift from spam to phishing attacks is noticeable, and is on the rise. If there's a single mantra to keep in mind, it's this -- the number one defense against phishing is awareness. Read More or on the phone, where they need to spontaneously come up with things to say. This is difficult for non-native speakers. Obviously, there are plenty of non-native speakers out there who are sincerely looking for a relationship, and they could very well be from heritage speaking communities in the United State or Britain. This isn’t a dead giveaway, but it’s something to watch out for.

Not Being Able to Meet

While the British scammer mentioned in the introduction to this article met his victims in person, most scammers will avoid face-to-face meetings at all costs. Even if they say they live near you, they’ll say they’re out of town and won’t be able to meet. They might even set up a time to meet and then say they were held up by something else.

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Of course, some people are just shy or are nervous about meeting people that they’ve met online—this isn’t anything out of the ordinary (it’s also possible that they’re trying to avoid getting caught by a spouse Ashley Madison: What Happens Now We Know You're A Cheater Ashley Madison: What Happens Now We Know You're A Cheater The Ashley Madison dating site was recently hacked by hackers who threatened to leak the entire database unless the site closed. This week, the database has been leaked. Are your indiscretions about to become public? Read More ). However, repeated excuses at the last minute are a definite warning sign. Some scammers will use similar excuses for avoiding phone conversations, though many will talk to you on the phone before reeling you in for the scam.

Asking for Financial Information or Money

This is the big one. If the person you’re talking to is who they say they are, they almost certainly will not ask you for money or financial details. “How much money do you make?” is not a question that a sincere person is likely to ask on a first date. Asking for any other financial information—where you bank, anything about your credit cards, how much you have in savings—should be a big warning sign. Online dating websites aren’t the most secure Ashley Madison Leak No Big Deal? Think Again Ashley Madison Leak No Big Deal? Think Again Discreet online dating site Ashley Madison (targeted primarily at cheating spouses) has been hacked. However this is a far more serious issue than has been portrayed in the press, with considerable implications for user safety. Read More , so sharing any sensitive information might be a bad idea anyway.

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If they ask you for money, run. That’s almost a sure sign that you’re talking to a scammer. The most common reasons that they give for needing money are not being able to afford a passport, visa, other travel documents, or plane tickets (often to come see you); an emergency stay in the hospital that requires a huge sum of money; getting robbed while traveling; or not being able to access their money from abroad. There’s a huge variety of reasons that you could get. The point isn’t that the reason for needing money is strange—it’s that they’re asking you for money at all.

That just shouldn’t happen.

Because the profiles that scammers create often say that they make a lot of money, many people get caught by thinking that they’ll be reimbursed after loaning their suitor the money. A decent salary may look like a sign of trustworthiness, but remember that you don’t have any proof that this person is who they say they are, especially if you haven’t met.

Trust Your Instincts

Most of the time, you can spot an online dating scammer by trusting your instincts—if something looks off, be extra wary. It all seems obvious in hindsight, but people want to believe in other people, and that can get in the way of our better judgment. Always be on the lookout, and be extra wary when you meet new people online. If you have suspicions, don’t ignore them. Taking these precautions can help save you thousands of dollars—and even more heartbreak.

Have you been the victim of an online romance scam? Are the signs obvious in hindsight? What tipped you off to the scam? Share in the comments below!

Image credits: internet criminal by solar22 via Shutterstock, The Telegraph, Goodluz via Shutterstock.com, wavebreakmedia via Shutterstock.com, Orange Line Media via Shuterstock.com, Ajaptp via Shutterstock.com, ArtFamily via Shutterstock.com.

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  1. ConcernedNiece
    July 12, 2017 at 1:18 pm

    I'm writing because I have concerns that my aunt is currently being romanced by a scammer. She's 69, overweight, been divorced over 10 years, and hasn't dated at all in that time. She does have a 19 yr old daughter and has prob poured her time into that. But, she started talking to a guy on Our time.com last week. Within a couple days of making a profile. She's never been on a dating site before. He is supposedly 64 (looks like mid 50's to me), wife died of cancer, has a son, and lives a couple hrs from where we do in Alabama, BUT he is currently in Michigan for work b/c that is where he is from and has a business there. He also has told her he will be traveling to Mexico soon for work. I think she said he has a scrap metal business. Within a day or of meeting online he told her he was taking his profile down b/c he had met the woman for him. He then sent her a YouTube video of a song called "God Sent Me You" or something. She ate that up.

    He says he has a sister that has cancer here in Alabama that he says he helps care for. He has a foreign accent, speaks broken English, and says his family is of German descent. He is younger, attractive, has photos he has sent her of a red Mercedes in front of a large home and of him driving a boat. I Google image searched all of his photos with little luck. But, 2 of the photos matched seemingly fake LinkedIn profiles for a man with a different name. The guy on the profiles lives in LA, has a master's in engineering from Oxford, and is an account executive at the World Bank for 45 yrs. Believable, right? So, I sent those profiles to my aunt and she is supposedly done with him. Well he convinced her his former business partner embezzled all of his assets and scammed him. He told her that is also why he has no social media presence. She totally believes it. So that was 2 days ago and yesterday she was tickled to death b/c she got a call from an online gift company that's delivering her a $140 6ft pink Teddy bear. *Gag* According to her daughter she has been talking to him non stop, via text, phone, or email. We have tried to get her to video chat with him or to ask for a photo with her name and the date on it. She has refused. I think she wants to continue living in Lala land. We just don't know how to get through to her. The guy in the pictures is way too attractive and young for her, so she probably doesn't want to mess it up is my guess.

    I was like you've given him your address to send you a Teddy Bear and even if he is the guy in the photos he could be a criminal, convicted sex offender, etc. She says "he's so genuine and honest".

    So thoughts? Any doubt she's being scammed?

  2. Aquagirl
    July 2, 2017 at 12:25 am

    Hi, I had this guy, who suddenly appear in my facebook sending me a friend request..since I am into online networking business, I thought he is interested in my online marketing, so I accepted his friend request.. I checked his fb profile, and saw only very few post..on his cover photo, he was sitting in a very luxurious car..he told me that he is still new in fb, so there is no other photos on it. He told me, if we can chat on hangouts, so i said ok..when I we chatted on hang outs, he ask me eagerly about myself, so I told him, why dont you be the one to tell me about yours, so, he told so many things about himself, he isaid he is a chief engineer wirking in oil rig, he is from uk but he was currently at the atlantic ocean. He is a widower, he has a 12 yr old son..his wife died in malaria during her work in africa and nigeria...but later in our conversation, he suddenly expressed her interst in me..he said he is retiring soon and he wants to settle down with me..I was shocked because we did not know each other well.. I told him that I have a bf, and he never mind about it..he is 49 yrs old and is retiring too soon??? He said he was si busy, he only gets a vacation once every 4months..it very unusual for a guy to express his feelings so very quick...because I am in diubt, I did not chatted him anymore, and blocked him in hangouts. I even uninstalled my hungots so that he cant disturb me anymore...do you think he is a scammer,? His name is COLLIN ERICSON, I search his name in google, but i dont see his profile info in google..so that made me think he is really a scammer...

    • tipstir
      July 3, 2017 at 8:36 am

      Yes that's a scammer.. Very good you spotted that he was from Nigeria. Everything else he told you was a lie. I got a women from Nigeria telling me she was searching and find me and thought it would be nice to get to know me. I didn't think nothing of it until she started to love me already. What?? It's been 1 month into this. Who ever is behind all of this has spent a lot of money in data. She contacts me every day. She's a student, works at salon and runs jewelry business as well. The read Flag was that she said some guys came into the studio and said for 350,000 nira she could get a visa to US. 450,000 nira she could stay with her husband in US for 2 years on visa. You see all this is false the price is less than 60,000 Nira. I feel like this is such a waste of time. Then she send me a copy of her Nigerian passport. I have notice that it has errors in the spelling and birth year is looks like it was made from the number 6 instead of 9. Goes to show you what they would do for the money. I confronted her about all of this but she said what am I talking about. I doubt she's be coming here real soon. Because they never do, if you don't pay for it but even if you do they still won't come because they no you will keep sending the money. Why leave your country to go and see the guy or girl sending you money for hopes, dreams and non-visit..

  3. David Mercer
    June 19, 2017 at 4:48 am

    Beware of a scammer using the name Katie Morgan claiming to live in Orlando Florida and has a daughter named Vera. She lives in Lagos Nigeria and may have you send her money through another person via Western Union or MoneyGram. She may eventually ”come clean" with you admitting she lives in Ikeja Lagos Nigeria and has a friend named Nneka and tells you you can send money to her in the name Katie Morgan Nneka because the banks there won't allow her to receive money using her "actual" name. This person will swear her undying love and may refer to you as her "King". If you say you're done with her she'll say she's going to commit suicide. May even tell you she's either in the hospital or just got out of the hospital.

  4. David Mercer
    June 19, 2017 at 4:31 am

    I was caught in a romance scam for over a year. This person told me they lived in another state but would not call. Money was sent to this person (several thousand dollars, as they told me they were divorced after her ex abandoned her and her daughter). After six months of being lied to this person "came clean" and told me her daughter was living with her aunt in the US and that her ex abandoned her in Nigeria with nothing but her luggage. Said her name is Katie Morgan but had Western Union/Money Gram transfers always sent to others as the banks in Nigeria wouldn't allow transfers to be sent in her name because it wasn't a Nigerian name. Then I was told it had met a lady that she'd became good friends with named Nneka and that I could send money to her in the name Katie Morgan Nneka. That was the final straw and I've since stopped talking to this person and changed my phone number.

    • tipstir
      July 3, 2017 at 8:42 am

      The're out there they want your money because they're the winner you are the loser. They have their own song about. Never give them money, they will do everything they can to get your money. I smart they will never get it. I would like to see one of them actually fly here. Western Union is suppose to ask you how long you know this person and protect you from sending the money. You don't know this girl she's a fake and lair. They just want the money nothing else matters just the money!

  5. NotFallingForIt
    June 15, 2017 at 12:59 am

    Are you really trying to offer another scam on an article that talks about how to be aware of scams? Recommend deleting this post above.

  6. Dawn Roberts
    June 11, 2017 at 10:18 am

    All, beware of Fred Jacobson. Scammer! I wish I knew how to report him to the authorities.

  7. Beverly
    June 6, 2017 at 8:35 pm

    In this article they suggest a search, for someone you think may be trying to scam you, says the search is free... so you type in your first, last name and email address. The next screen asks for a credit card number and which option you'd like to use?? Why did the previous screen say 'free' if it's not actually free. That sounds like a scam right there.

  8. Lee Hargadon
    May 25, 2017 at 9:31 am

    I'm in contact with a orthopaedic doctor, who tells me his in Ukraine, we've been chatting every day for some time now. He claims to have two young sons, firstly he asked me for iTunes card so he could communicate with his boys, i was stupid enough to get him £15 of them, then next UN hadn't delivered supplies, so he was hungry and dirty, he asked for £200, which i said i would try and get but never . Then last night he said could i get £150 because supplies still not arrived. He constantly tells me how much i mean to him, but don't they all? Since joining a dating site, think I've had more scammers than hot dinners.
    I chat with him on viber, what should I do?

    • Dann Albright
      May 29, 2017 at 9:02 pm

      Sounds like the best thing to do is just cease all contact. All of that sounds like typical scam techniques, and it'll be easier to just cut off all communication.

    • Beverly
      June 6, 2017 at 8:40 pm

      Wow that sounds very much like the man I've been talking to...I met him on CatholicMatches.com
      He also asked me for an ITunes card, then last night he asked me for money because he's out at sea working on oil spillages and his contract is at risk because he miscalculated and now they have run out of chemicals. If he doesn't get the money he will lose the contract and not get paid for all his time, efforts and hard work (and will not get paid) as they will reassign the contract elsewhere. I could go on but it sounds like we're taking to the same man....or men who have been trained the same way.

    • Beverly
      June 6, 2017 at 9:19 pm

      Reading these posts I'm shocked to see how much scamming seems to be "a thing" now days. I've had two attempts made on me in the last 3 months; and luckily I didn't fall for it. I met the first one on FB and only accepted his friend request because we had a friend in common. I went to his timeline to see who the friend was, and it was a childhood friend I've known since the 3rd grade. Strange though.... she was his ONLY friend. Now after this has happened again, and the 2 men sounded like the same man (probably was); I've been online the last two days looking at sites like this one... "how to spot and avoid dating scammers" and come to find out, all the hints they say to be on the lookout for, matched both men; and gullible me, I still wanted to give this last one the benefit of the doubt. It's amazing how we can become attached to, and really start to care about someone just through conversation! My friends kept telling me to watch out, and I said that he hadn't asked me for money as the first one had. Lo and behold 2 days later he asked if I could send him an ITunes card, I though that wasn't asking for much considering he's out at sea, etc.... so I sent a $50.00 gift card. Then 4 days later (last night) he wanted a lot more, for a seemingly good reason, but when I told him no, he turned very cold, where before, he was madly in love and couldn't wait to meet, that I was the best woman that he'd had the good fortune to meet, yada yada yada. Luckily I wasn't taken for more. As much as I liked him and wanted to meet him eventually I figured $50.00 wouldn't hurt me. So I know much more now after going to these sites on how to spot and avoid scammers, but it's just too emotionally draining ; I went to the Catholic dating site where I met him and opted out on renewing my subscription. Mine expires in November and I will not be renewing it. I'm very wary now about meeting someone online who is honest and trustworthy, who wants a relationship and not money. Well I wish everyone luck, just be very careful out there in cyberspace. Too bad the old saying is true..."if it sounds too good to be true...."

  9. Pat
    May 5, 2017 at 1:39 am

    I did the dumbest thing ever. I actually started talking to man through his email. He was going to be leaving the site soon etc. With in seven days we had 48 pages of emails. None of his information could be verified. A meeting had been set up, but postponed because he had to go to the UK on business. He knew I had no money up front, why keep up the front? He claimed to be pretty wealthy, but when I checked where he said he lived, it was cockroach infested apartments in very bad section of town. The real kicker he was out of town (supposedly local) at the time, and he asked me what airport he had to fly into to get to our locality. The idiot didn't know how to get home. REALLY!!!!!

    • Dann Albright
      May 13, 2017 at 5:53 pm

      Yeah, that sounds pretty suspicious. Glad you saw through it. :-)

  10. Blue
    April 26, 2017 at 3:06 am

    I think my friend is being groomed by a scammer. Its happening on facebook. On her page she only has pictures of herself and some of my friend that he sent her. She has no friends listed on her page. Its like she has no life. He is too innocent to see it. She is young and pretty, he is 48 and bald.. Her name on fb is sandra ashlyn from california city california. I really hope he doesnt get conned out of any money.

    • Nona
      April 29, 2017 at 7:09 pm

      I think you're right. I've seen "California City, CA" and "Oregon City, OR" and "Michigan City, MI" etc. on so many profiles that scream scam that it makes me think these scammers aren't very creative! I wish we didn't have to wade through all this crap to find love. I've given up on it. I would date a guy who is 48 and bald (maybe because I'm an age appropriate match), but I can't find any who are real and who aren't looking for 28-year-old women. Sigh. I hope your friend survives this without losing his life savings.

      • Dann Albright
        May 13, 2017 at 5:38 pm

        Well, to be completely fair, California City and Oregon City are real places.

    • Dann Albright
      May 13, 2017 at 5:37 pm

      That does sound a bit like a scam, but it's always hard to tell. Have there been any updates since you posted this?

  11. James Lara
    April 24, 2017 at 1:44 am

    I'm devastated. I met this girl on Skout, and at first, everything was coming along at a nice pace, we started talking around midnight, but everything escalated quickly. She is from CA, like me, but "working" in Nigeria. That same night, she told she was out of the country for research and her debit card wasn't working. She said she would be home in two weeks from the day we met, which will be three days from the day I am posting this. She said she needed to pay her phone bill so she would be able to talk to me. I payed her through Western Union. She then needed grocery money, so i then payed her the next couple days. I even called her out that this was a scam, and she said she would never scam me or hurt me. We argued for a while asking what is her benefit from scamming me, and i told her my money. She never left. I asked her to send a photo of herself with a sign with my name, which I did for her, and the photo looked photoshopped. I called her out on it and she got mad, but she sent me a real photo with her same top, just without the sign. I helped her out with groceries on and off until she told me if she doesn't pay her hotel bill, she will go to jail. She sent me a picture of a check from a restaurant in Tennessee, where she is not from, and asked me to put it in my account, cash it, then wire it to her. I told her no, this is a scam. She said she was heartbroken because I thought she was fake. We argued all day that day and she said she just wanted to see me. She said i don't need to deposit the money and that she will be fine. She said she just wants my love. In her country, it is an 8 hour time difference, and she said she literally hated working out there. She text me when she got up, she even fell asleep a couple times. She seemed legit. And she wasn't even model-type, she was really cute though with live selfies. She sent me many pictures of herself and no similar images popped up with reverse image search. I sent her a couple of mine, and she said no dirty pics, and she said she is a virgin. I don't know what to believe honestly, I'm 99% sure this is a scam lol

    • Dann Albright
      May 13, 2017 at 5:31 pm

      It's impossible to say for sure, but that definitely sounds like a scam to me. Be careful!

    • Ja
      May 28, 2017 at 2:48 pm

      Really. Its a scam. When they ask for money then it is a scam. If not, then that person is just using you for money.

    • Zap
      June 9, 2017 at 9:59 am

      Tell her to come and meet you and you will REIMBURSE HER plane ticket 5 times over.
      If she is legit she will come.

      If she refuses = scam.
      I did this with a TON of Philippino women who "loved" me.

  12. Mr P
    February 9, 2017 at 9:10 am

    I got talking to a woman on a dating site. The conversation moved from the site to whatsapp and we have been talking on whatsapp for a long time in the evening and she is sending videos and images of herself. Everything being talked about is normal in the conversation and nothing out of the ordinary. Tuesday she said that she needed to go to casablanca for a meeting about some affairs. Then on wednesday she said that the meeting is not going well and that she needs to send a package to france and could I receive this package. It is at this moment I knew that it was a scam, so now I am playing the scammer. My best line so far has been that I have shown her photo to my friend who is a policeman and he thinks that you are really cute and that he looks forward to meeting you. I have given all her details to the local police.

    • Dann Albright
      February 11, 2017 at 4:25 pm

      I like this idea!

  13. Mike
    January 14, 2017 at 9:45 am

    I fell into it too met this really pretty woman online kept saying she loved me all the time long story short bought her a cell phone calls me can barely understand her such bs got me to purchase a plane ticket well i stopped it she goes by the name juliet corsy, or ruth juliet anni , she has 3 phone numbers all differnt locations she will say she's rich has money coming to her dont believe it its all bullshit

    • Dann Albright
      January 18, 2017 at 11:41 pm

      It's certainly not just women that are affected by this. Thanks for sharing your story.

      • Zap
        June 9, 2017 at 10:01 am

        Actually it's mostly men who are the victims by "young women" and older women who are scammed by "younger men".

        Nobody knows the real sex of the scammer though...

        • meg
          June 21, 2017 at 12:06 am

          hi zap,

          im a filipina, but how sure are you that these filipino women are really scamming you? I thnk im being scammed too. He pretended to be in Milwaukee WI, but the phne number he's using is from TX. and his accent is like a nigerian guy. good thing no other info has been divulged to this guy yet, although before , he asked me how much i earn for a living and my bank details too, since he wants to send me some packages full of clothers, gadgets, shoes, and even appliances. LOL. I think its just stupid to believe that easily, but it is just but normal to give these people the benefit of the doubt that maybe, just maybe, they like you for real reasons.. Oh well...

  14. Anonymous
    December 18, 2016 at 7:03 am

    I started dating a guy from Ghana and we had been talking for almost four months. In the first month he asked would I be supportive of him and I asked what did he mean and he said if I could help him get a place because he lived with a friend and had no privacy. That was strange he would ask that but when I explained to him I couldn't he understood and never asked again. Next month he claimed to have been using someones phone and that he had to return it. We went from talking everyday to barely talking and I had got use to talking everyday, so when he asked if I could help him with a new phone I helped him. I sent him $100 Not too much but thats all i could do. He wanted me to western union the money which I did and he told me he didnt have a id and that I had to put his friend name down because he was going to have his friend do it and I did. These things didnt really sit well with me but I continued to talk to him because he was very nice. It wasnt until recently (a few days ago to be exact) that I realized I am being scammed. Like we video chat and everything...but while we were video chatting he told me someone from the UK has contacted him. He said his mother passed away 2 years ago and they wanted to give him what she left behind. First thing is he never told me his mother passed and when he was saying it he appeared to be very sad... so he says the lady doesnt want to send the money straight to him because she doesnt want it to get traced because other people in the company does not want him to have the money. He asks if I can deposit the money in my bank account then send it to him. So when he said this "woman" needs some info from me to make the deposit I said ok. He says she wants my name, address, bank name, bank number, account number routing number, online account and pswd, and my ssn THAT WAS MY DEFINITE RED FLAG. Im like why does she need all this and he says she need it for the deposit. Im telling him she would not need all that, but he's trying to pressure me to do it and saying I need to trust him. I kept saying a relationship with no trust is no relationship at all. So i started looking up things online and thats how I noticed I was being scammed. From the strong feelings so fast, to the love quotes, just everything they speak of online is what I'm dealing with. The crazy thing is his profile is real, we video chat and everything. It hurts so bad to know that I have been talking to someone for 4 months developing real true genuine feelings and the whole time he was after my money. I am only 28 and so is he...so he say... idk what to do, but I needed to share my story. Im so ashamed because he has photos of me and my address. Idk whats to come next...???

    • Dann Albright
      December 28, 2016 at 7:11 pm

      Yeah, requesting all of that information is definitely a warning sign. I'm glad to hear that you thought of that right away! Many people don't realize it until later.

  15. cc Clean
    October 24, 2016 at 2:18 am

    This is my story: I wasn't looking for a date, but came across the site by chance. I was on for a very short time when I got hit up. First by a guy that said he was a doctor, but sounded more like a moron. Within a week he was calling me 'Babe'. Soon after I was approached by another that was quite good at his craft. Exceptional actually, but there does seem to be pattern. I'd like to share my findings here, but how can I know that the scammers aren't here looking for tips?

    I will go so far as to write about an experience I had that left me quite baffled. Hopefully you can shed some light on it.

    You mentioned that we need to go with our gut feelings. This is a tip that is becoming more and more true in this day and age in general.

    The encounter I had was with a man with a picture of a naked chest as his profile picture. He provided no other picture. Most of our correspondence was , 'Hi', 'Hey', 'How you doing?' . . . quite general and quite boring, but I was curious.

    I started chatting with him shortly after I had encountered my first perpetrator (I'll call him 'suitor' for the sake of this question). There was no reason to believe that one had anything to do with the other, but I had this gut feeling that in some way this new guy (naked chest) was somehow connected.

    Anyway, 'Naked chest' asked for my number and I ignored the question. Later when my curiosity was heightened, I gave it to him. After more of the same tiresome dialect he suggested that he had been asking me out and wanted to know if we could meet up. I unknowingly missed that clue . . . non-the-less I took him up on his proposal.

    We were to meet at the market in his neighborhood. I arrived early and texted him to let me know when he got there, and that I was going to go into one of the other stores. He texted me when he arrived (later than expedited). I came out and waited, but there was no one to be seen. He texted that he had to take a call form his 'boss' and he was terribly sorry. The call would take longer than he intended. I told him I was going to grab a bite to eat, to just let me know when he was available. I finally gave up and told him I was heading home. He said "I'm so sorry". I asked if he saw me. He said 'no'. The next day I didn't hear anything. Again curiosity got the better of me. After a couple of days I said, 'If you'd like to try again, let me know, otherwise just tell me you're not interested and there would be no hard feelings.' I never heard from him again, tho I've seen him active on the site.

    For the sake of argument, I think it helpful to say, I look exactly as I do in my pictures, so it wasn't a matter of my appearance. My curiosity can't help but wonder if his 'boss' was my 'suitor'. But what would be the purpose, what would the purpose be either way?

    • Dann Albright
      December 28, 2016 at 7:09 pm

      That's a pretty strange scenario. Just goes to show that it's a good idea to listen to your intuition in these sorts of situations!

  16. cc Clean
    October 23, 2016 at 11:56 pm

    I've read that statistics show that one in 10 people on a dating sight is a scam. My experience , however, has been more like only one out of 10 is the real deal.

    This is my story: I wasn't looking for a date, but came across the site by chance. I was on for a very short time when I got hit up. First by a guy that said he was a doctor, but sounded more like a moron. Within a week he was calling me 'Babe'. Soon after I was approached by another that was quite good at his craft. Exceptional actually, but there does seem to be pattern. I'd like to share my findings here, but how can I know that the scammers aren't here looking for tips?

    I will go so far as to write about an experience I had that left me quite baffled. Hopefully you can shed some light on it.

    You mentioned that we need to go with our gut feelings. This is a tip that is becoming more and more true in this day and age in general.

    The encounter I had was with a man with a picture of a naked chest as his profile picture. He provided no other picture. Most of our correspondence was , 'Hi', 'Hey', 'How you doing?' . . . quite general and quite boring, but I was curious.

    I started chatting with him shortly after I had encountered my second perpetrator (I'll call him 'suitor' for the sake of this question). There was no reason to believe that one had anything to do with the other, but I had this gut feeling that in some way this new guy (naked chest) was somehow connected.

    Anyway, 'Naked chest' asked for my number and I ignored the question. Later when my curiosity was heightened, I gave it to him. After more of the same tiresome dialect he suggested that he had been asking me out and wanted to know if we could meet up. I unknowingly missed that clue . . . non-the-less I took him up on his proposal.

    We were to meet at the market in his neighborhood. I arrived early and texted him to let me know when he got there, and that I was going to go into one of the other stores. He texted me when he arrived (later than expedited). I came out and waited, but there was no one to be seen. He texted that he had to take a call form his 'boss' and he was terribly sorry. The call would take longer than he intended. I told him I was going to grab a bite to eat, to just let me know when he was available. I finally gave up and told him I was heading home. He said "I'm so sorry". I asked if he saw me. He said "no'" The next day I didn't hear anything. Again curiosity got the better of me. After a couple of days I said, 'If you'd like to try again, let me know, otherwise just tell me you're not interested and there would be no hard feelings.' I never heard from him again, tho I've seen him active on the site.

    For the sake of argument, I think it helpful to say, I look exactly as I do in my pictures, so it wasn't a matter of my appearance. My curiosity can't help but wonder if his 'boss' was my 'suitor'. But what would be the purpose, what would the purpose be either way?

    Collier Circle

    • Dann Albright
      October 26, 2016 at 9:31 pm

      That is pretty strange, you're right. Definitely seem suspicious, though. Glad to hear you're being careful!

  17. Lynn
    October 23, 2016 at 6:14 pm

    I am not sure- but I believe this guy is trying to set up trust. He has sent me about 15 pictures- including one of his daughter- nothing came up in various searches- an architect who first had to travel to Paris- who sent me pictures of he posing w the landmarks I asked( but he could have these in his arsenal just in case- I asked him to send me a picture of him lying in bed- he did-there is someone by his name listed in his town in the white pages- his daughters name when searched has this guy's name as a relative. His English reflects his education very well spoken- but is is Acraa Ghana surveying the land as an architecture before the hotel is built- dropped his phone- does not have money on him for his iphone6- I told him to buy a throw away prepaid if it was important to speak w me. He asked again- I refused- he apologized that he bothered me and continued to talk to me. His communication is sparse now saying the interconnect is bad in Ghana. I have questioned him about the weather- he is on the mark and he called me both from Paris and Acraa- both with the correct country code- I am cautious but confused

    • Dann Albright
      October 26, 2016 at 9:30 pm

      That's a tough call. There are quite a few signs that it could be a scam, but his responsiveness to your requests seems like a good sign. Either way, be very cautious, especially if he starts asking for things from you.

  18. Jerome Martin
    October 14, 2016 at 3:21 am

    I was scammed on surge ! Cute younger guy chatted for a bit and seemed fine. Then asked me to do a hookup Id for LGBT offenders . He gave me the link to get verified and it said it was free but needed a cc to validate me. So like a dummy I used my only cc I had ( bank card ) and the sight charged me 39.99. I told him what it did and he sent me another link to clear it and get my money back, but that link asked for my cc info again. I told him this and he said I had to put it in again to get my money back and get the free trail. So I did but my card was declined , I freaked out thinking that my account was wipe clean out. So I checked my account and it was only the 39.99 taken out still . I told him this then he ask how much money my card had on it ( red flag ) I told him enough lol . I call my bank and closed my debit card and have a new one coming in 3 days. I feel I got lucky and that he was planning somehow to clean out my bank account . So I am on the look out now that's for sure. People suck!!

    • Dann Albright
      October 21, 2016 at 8:53 pm

      Sorry to hear about that! I'm glad you didn't get scammed for all you're worth. It could have been a lot worse. Thanks for sharing your experience—hopefully it helps someone else avoid the same fate!

  19. Sad
    August 29, 2016 at 8:17 pm

    It's funny, (not really) but you believe you are getting conned and yet you can't believe that it can actually happen to you. I met a fellow on a dating site - made a good connection, gave him my phone number, he wanted to send me something so I gave him my home address and I got flowers and chocolates. I was on cloud nine. He didn't want to meet until we talked and knew we had a connection. Made sense, I had never been on a dating site before. After a very short time he called be sweetheart in his emails/texts and I liked his compliments. He is an engineer and was submitting different bids. Had one accepted in Turkey - and would be flying out the following week to set up the initial contacts and set up the working plan. He is there for less than a week, and a project that was happening in the US was having problems can I send him $11,000. to cover off. I don't have that kind of money, but I had saved $4000.00 that I could lend him till he gets back. Next week for sure. Talk to him by phone and the project in Turkey has problems and he now must pay for repairs to a machine that one of his employees broke. Needs more money. I don't have any. Every time he phones, texts, he asks if I have come up with any solution because we are in this together. He calls and says he can come home, the Director of the project will allow him to leave so he can get his financial situation straightened out in the US. But he doesn't have the funds to purchase the ticket, could I give him the money? I do. He gets to the airport and can't get on the flight, the machinery company will not allow him to board the plane. He gets a lawyer and the lawyer discusses with machinery company, if he now buys the machinery they will allow him out of the country. He need $30,000.00 to buy the machinery and when the project is done, he can sell it and recoup some of the funds. I am suppose to go to the bank for a loan in order for this to proceed. He has no one else that can help him, so he says. I read this and I think, oh come on, are you that blind, so in love with a fictional character on the computer. Yet, I think, he is this great person, that I might be missing out on. Then what....I feel like a fool, in my gut I think I am getting screwed, and in my heart I want this person.

    • Dann Albright
      October 21, 2016 at 8:55 pm

      So sorry to hear about your experience . . . that's really rough. You're right, though; even if you're on the lookout for scams, you can still be taken advantage of. They're really good at what they do.

    • Anonymous
      December 18, 2016 at 7:12 am

      That's exactly how I feel

    • Laura
      March 18, 2017 at 10:05 pm

      I just had a go round with this SAME guy. I reported him to Match.com as a scammer.
      I didn't give in when he asked that I wire money to Turkey and called him out but he continued to try to keep me on the hook. Same story, his credit card not working in Turkey and he needs $$ for machines and materials and as soon as that's settled he'll be coming home to spend a week with me.
      He told me he was an architect/specialist contractor and yes got a job in Turkey that he had to leave town immediately for. Had a supposed Turkish cell and whatsapp acct.
      I demanded he send me verified ID and he kept coming up with reasons why he could not--company in Turkey keeps their passports until the job is done, he left his driver's license at home. He finally sent me a fake CA driver's license with a bunch of mistakes on it and when I called him out on that he finally stopped trying to keep me on the hook. He popped up on Match.com under a new profile and I reported him again.

      • Dann Albright
        March 29, 2017 at 5:58 pm

        While I'm not totally convinced it's the same guy, it certainly bears a remarkable resemblance! I'm glad you figured it out in time.

  20. Debbie
    August 12, 2016 at 3:28 am

    I got on our time.com looking for somebody and I found a guy who live in New York who is going to work in Egypt and this one on for for five months and I believe that's where he was and he was coming to Florida to meet me and I sent him money and actually I gave him I gave him my bank account number And he put money in it and the bank said it wasn't real so now I have a case on it from the police and the fraud department so I'm scared to see what happens to me I believed everything he said, I sent a iPhone over for his birthday and a PlayStation 4 for his daughter I was so stupid I have been so sick over this mess I just hope I do not get in trouble .

    • Dann Albright
      August 16, 2016 at 2:18 pm

      I wouldn't worry about getting in trouble; people get scammed all the time, and I don't think that's much of an issue. Also, don't be too hard on yourself; the people who do this are experts, and they know exactly which emotional triggers to use. They're really good at what they do, and you're not the first or last person to be taken advantage of.

  21. Lottalibella
    August 2, 2016 at 7:22 pm

    About two weeks ago, I (f, 33) met a guy on the "Whisper" app. He said his name was Jim, he was 31 years old and lived in Texas. I live in Germany and I am German.
    He seemed very nice and we connected really well right from the beginning. I texted with him for about five days in a row for several hours every night and enjoyed it very much. He told me that he was a computer network architect who worked from home. When I said that I think that he must be very intelligent because I could never do a job like his, he told me that I was so full of compliments that night. When I replied that I didn't want to come across as slimy, he told me: "You dont. You just seem like a girl who might be falling for a guy." Even though this wasn't the case for me (I cannot fall for someone who I haven't met in person), in order to tease him a little bit, I replied: "Maybe... for a guy like you...".
    To this he answered: "I'm hoping. Because I'm really falling for you!" Now in hindsight it really seems odd that someone would write something like this after having texted for only a few days. But then I somehow really believed him...
    One evening when we were in the middle of texting again, he wrote all of a sudden: "I have bad news. My mom just called. She thinks my Dad is having a heart attack. She dialed 911. I have to go over there immediately." He promised me that he would write me the following day (Friday), which he actually did. He told me that his Dad had actually had a heart attack and was now in hospital in intensive care and that a bypass surgery was planned for the following day (Saturday). The next time I heard from him was Sunday night. He texted me: "I don't know how to say this. My Dad didn't make it. He didn't even make it to the surgery but passed late Friday night." He also wrote that he was very busy and that it would take him a day or two until he could be on "Whisper" again. I completely believed what he told me and I didn't expect him to text me until a few days later. To my surprise, he already texted the following night again, saying that he was having a few minutes alone and that he would be glad if we could talk for a little while. He told me a little bit about the funeral arrangements and other things he and his family were occupied with at the moment. He was very sweet in what he wrote (he said it was so nice talking to me and that I was so sweet etc.) but also seemed really drained and devastated. Of course, I believed the things he told me and tried to comfort him. At some piont he said that he should leave before long but didn't want to, so we continued texting further. After about another five minutes he wrote: "I better go. I wish I could talk all night, but family calls." I responded how much I had enjoyed talking to him that night and that I wished I could be there with him in this difficult time to comfort him.
    But he never responded again! He jhas completely disappeared since then. No "Good night" or "Talk to you soon" or anything like that on this night and not a single sign from him since then.
    I already had a strange feeling that night when I didn't get a real goodbye from him, since he always used to wish me a good night before leaving. Then again, I thought that he was probabaly too devastated to pay attention to such things in this difficult time. I texted him the following night and asked if he was ok. (Of course I didn't expect long text messages from him at that point. I just wanted to know how he was doing.) No response! Then, for the following days I texted him again that I was missing him and that I was worried about him and just wanted to know if he was okay. Again no response (but also no blocking on his part.) He has just remained completely silent since he wrote me: "I better go..." this one night. Today marks the 8th day since I last heard from him and after having sent him another message last night, I have now decided not to write him again and have also deleted our conversation. By doing this I am not able to contact him any longer the only way of getting in contact again would be if he texted me. But I don't think this will happen...

    Dear Mr. Albright,

    I would love to get your opinion on this story. Do you think I have fallen victim to a romantic scam here? Considering the fact that he told me he was falling for me, only not to respond to my messages at all shortly after, but ignoring me completely instead. Or do you think that it might really be the case that the death of a close family member has such an impact on someone that he actually might not be able to communicate by writing just one short sentence in order to let the person he was allegedly falling for know how he is doing?

    Thank you so much for reading this story! I would really appreciate an answer from you.

    Best regards from Germany

    • Dann Albright
      August 11, 2016 at 3:01 pm

      That's strange . . . because he didn't ask you for money or anything, it seems unlikely to be a scam, but the behavior sounds a lot like the typical stories you hear, so it's possible that it was an aborted attempt to ask you for money. It's really hard to tell, especially when contact was just broken off. I wish I had better advice for you!

  22. Anonymous
    July 9, 2016 at 8:46 am

    Part Two: How can a person who has never interact with you tell you they love you. Only a month later. Never give anyone money or buy gifts for someone you don't know. If the person can only talk to you for 10 to 15 minutes on the phone everyday. Red Flag. You must interact and be a part of that persons life to build a true relationship. Don't ignore Red Flags! Those red flags are their to protect you. Plus remember you are not desperate, take your time do a background check and who gives a damn if the person is insulted because you have chosen to check what's behind the door. Your first Love should be you looking out for yourself.

  23. Anonymous
    July 9, 2016 at 8:37 am

    I met man from Brisbane Australia. Named Wayne Harrison who claims he works for Qantas Airline. If this man contacts you via any dating site. Women Run and I mean run real fast. He is only interested in having an affair. He is a true Sociopath! Everything he says is a lie all lies all the time. First warning sign which I ignored was when he sent me a Birthday card. But on the card he put my Address and not his. I completely ignored what was truly a Red Flag. Then I was invited to come and visit Brisbane but only when his wife left on a vacation was I invited. He stated by the way he was in the process of divorcing. I ignored this Red Flag also. If a person is not Divorce and cannot produce legal Divorce papers that you can hold in your hand and check online they filed then run. Second Red Flag. Another major Red Flag was him telling me a month later that he loved me

    • Dann Albright
      July 13, 2016 at 5:45 pm

      That doesn't sound like a scam, but sorry you went through that experience!

  24. Anonymous
    July 7, 2016 at 7:13 pm

    I hope someone can help me, I met someone on a gay dating site, he was the same age as me, and sent me pictures, and I thought wow, someone this handsome really is writing to me, he didn't say he was young or overseas, and said that he lives in New York, and he was an engineer and Architect and would send me pictures of construction sites that he was working at, and said that he had a firm in New York, and he didn't ask for my e-mail address until later when we got to know each other. then we exchanged number but will only use Viber as he says that he likes this service, no questions asked and I didn't mind as we were just talking, so the following week after we exchanged numbers and email address he was going to Rome to visit his mom and girls, he said that he was divorced and because he was gay, but anyways, he went to Rome for Easter and will be back in two weeks, well a week later was going to be my birthday, and he asked for my address and I did ask for his as well, and he did give me a New York Address, so again, I didn't question it, but on my birthday, he sent me roses, and I was very happy and then he send me a picture of him holding a sign saying happy birthday, I was so happy and I thought I found my dream guy, but when he was suppose to go home his mom fell down the stairs and broke her knee, so he had to prepare for her care, but then he had to go to Berlin for a meeting which they accepted him as the designer of their building and he had to go to Ghana and has been there since, we have been corresponding for several months and he keeps me informed on the progress of the building, and was suppose to be here this week, but delay in building, but now he says he ran out of funds and cannot finish the roof, he says that he had to use all of his money and several of his people have helped and asked if I can fund him 50000 dollars to help, but I said that I don't have that type of money and asked if I can get a loan and he will pay it back when he gets here, but what is bothering me know Is that he isn't being loving as he was for the past few months and he said that its because he doesn't know what is going to happen to the building, so I was thinking about him and did a google search and his pictures that he has sent me is of the famous photographer in New York, and I am confused as he didn't seem like a scammer, but the guy I have been writing to is Godfred Hesse and does anyone know if this guy is real, I know his pictures aren't but I am having such a hard time believing that he is lying to me, I can't afford the 50000 but he doesn't stop writing and he isn't begging, he is upset that he can't get this project done. Maybe I am being stupid or guidable, I don't know, and I am not that ugly looking, so I am confused, please help.

    • Dann Albright
      July 13, 2016 at 5:45 pm

      Asking you for $50,000? That definitely sounds like a con. I just can't imagine that being real. I'd recommend breaking off contact immediately. I know it's hard, but the risks are awfully high. Scammers are good at what they do, and they rarely "seem like" scammers. Sorry you're going through this!

  25. Owen
    May 3, 2016 at 6:32 pm

    Hi I met a gay man on gay Cupid he asked me for my e mail address which I have him he wanted to come over and visit me but said he only had 100 dollars so I said i would not send him his air flight personally but I would go through a travel agency which he recommended so I sent 576$ to the travel agents bank using swift bank numbers the travel agency sent me his reservation number and confirmed it then there was another problem he needed travel money so me not thinking I sent another 400$ on the day he was about to fly he said he was in a bad car accident and sent me letter to confirm it which he said his mother scanned for him also phot of him in hospital he said he will change air ticket flight when he gets better I don't know if i have been scammed or not

    • Morgan
      May 23, 2016 at 11:57 pm

      Sorry for all this situation you are going thru. But 100% sure that person is a con artist , and found you and easy target.
      I just received a communication from an wonderful-good looking gay guy from Russia asking me for money, I met him thru a gay site.
      Is been three weeks only , not enough time for this ,a friend of mine has a similar story , therefore I do have all the warnings . Needless to say , I didn't believe , so I went thru all the information on the web about gay-scam-fraud ,so after that I decided to call the FBI and report this crook : https://www.fbi.gov/scams-safety/e-scams
      I hope my story will help.

    • Dann Albright
      July 13, 2016 at 5:43 pm

      Yeah, that's almost certainly a scam. I'd cease contact with this person and report him to Cupid!

  26. Leslie
    April 26, 2016 at 4:52 pm

    I ventured into the dating scene via Plenty of Fish after my divorce last year, and connected online with a very charming, pleasant-looking man who "lived" in Vancouver. His stated career was a civil engineer, he was widowed, & raising a young son on his own. He phoned me often (his number was listed as from the Vancouver area) and we spent a lot of time on Yahoo Messenger chatting daily. (I now know that moving women quickly off the dating site to a messenger site can be a red flag).
    As Dan Albright's article stated, this man was not able to meet because he had business in South Africa for several weeks. He called me daily with the South African number, keeping very close contact. I was very mixed in my thoughts. I wanted to believe that this was a burgeoning relationship, but I was also very anxious. And yes, he asked me for emergency money and against my better judgment, I sent him some. And then he asked for more a few days later; another work-related problem. I asked him questions about these issues and he always had a semi-viable excuse. But it became too much and I said I cannot do this anymore. The final straw was his request to send a large sum of money via my bank account. He sent me a "document" from his lawyer in the UK to verify that all was above board and I took it to my friend who is a lawyer. She said it was completely fraudulent (law firm's address in London was a pub), multiple spelling mistakes, false signatures, etc.). So with that and other inconsistencies I discovered like his picture on another dating site in Ontario, I confronted him about his scheme and blocked him.
    It was a difficult lesson, particularly since I was already feeling a bit vulnerable with starting to date again. I am still confounded by this man's incredible skill at bamboozling me (who is not normally gullible), and developing the illusion of a warm, caring, supportive bond.
    I reported him to the Anti-Fraud website in Canada, the local RCMP, Plenty of Fish dating site, and the other dating site in Ontario. I do not believe anything was investigated. POF had his profile still up weeks later, so no doubt he has more poor fish on his hook!

    • Dann Albright
      May 3, 2016 at 1:28 pm

      Sorry to hear about your difficulties with this! It all seems to obvious in hindsight, but I'm sure it can be very convincing in the moment. It's certainly not a rare occurrence, so it's clear that it happens to a lot of people. Thanks for sharing your story! I hope you get back to online dating soon and find some success. :-)

  27. Anonymous
    November 8, 2015 at 4:59 pm

    Hi Dann

    This is very good article to translate in another language, can you approve?

  28. Anonymous
    November 7, 2015 at 2:36 pm

    I encountered one of these scammers a year ago on a dating site. Long story short:

    She had photos that seemed way too professional. In her conversation she mentioned she had changed her hairstyle and that her phone camera was broken. Her webcam was also conveniently broken and she asked me to turn mine on.

    I TIN-EYE Searched the photos and found she was using an adult model's photos. After researching the adult model, I found that person's twitter feed and PMed her. She said "Oh, yes. You are SO BEING CATFISHED!"

    I reported this scammer's facebook profile with all the gathered evidence, reported her dating profile, and her iP ADDRESS is currently banned from facebook and the dating site.

  29. Anonymous
    November 6, 2015 at 11:17 pm

    I seem to actually be a "target" of these kind of scammers, the first time someone tried this trick with me was with an image of us marine general James Mattis in full uniform that showed his stars and the scammer claimed he was a colonel in the us army....

    Hallo, what about being prepared do research and know the different uniforms and rank distinctions??? Anyway, even in Norway people know who General Mattis is since his comments of "fun to shoot some people and afghans don't have any manhood left anyway".

    I played along for a while, that was fun, but then blow his scam by asking if he thought his mum enjoyed anal sex and he deleted his facebook profile for just to return to me, now with an image of us army general David Petreus.

    • Dann Albright
      November 7, 2015 at 6:16 pm

      You know, I'm surprised that people choose such high-profile pictures to use for these scams. Even if they're trying to go for the military thing, you'd think they'd just find a no-name solider and use that. Mattis and Petraeus are recognizable around the world, and not just to Americans. Obviously not everyone is very advanced in their scheming. :-)

      • Anonymous
        November 7, 2015 at 6:29 pm

        They are lazy because too often they do not have to do any work to get to peoples money, too many people want to believe them, so they just take the first high resolution images of american officers they can find in a google search, come up with a story about being a widow with a son in a school in London and go for them.

        (I wonder if Mattis and Pretraeus know their images being used in scams, but that is a different discussion).

        • Dann Albright
          November 10, 2015 at 4:23 am

          Yeah, I wonder that too. It seems like something they'd probably know about if it's happening on a regular basis, but they also have a lot of other things to worry about. :-)