Are Smartphones Getting Too Big? [MakeUseOf Poll]

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Last week we wondered whether you feel social media is taking over your life. Although I was certain this is a near and dear subject to many people’s lives, turns out not many of you really want to discuss it. This poll received only around 180 votes, but it could still be enough to get an idea of how you feel about social media.

Out of 183 votes in total, the breakdown was as follows: 30% feel they have a good balance between social networks and real life, 21% feel that social media is somewhat taking over their lives, 20% admit that social media really is taking over their lives, and another 30% don’t care about social media or don’t use it.

Full results and this week’s poll after the jump.

Surprisingly, our 180 votes were divided almost equally between the different options, but it seems that all in all, the majority doesn’t feel like it has a problem.

poll-results-nov-10

This week’s poll question is: Are Smartphones Getting Too Big?

Want to make some extra MakeUseOf reward points? The most useful comment on the poll will be awarded 150 points!

In a sharp change of subject, we’re moving to a topic which has been on my mind a lot lately. Are smartphones getting too big? When the iPhone first came into our lives, its 3.5” screen seemed pretty big, and the smartphones that followed were about the same impressive size. Five years later, we have a 4.8” Galaxy S3, a 4.7” new Nexus 4, a humongous 5.5” Galaxy Note 2, not to mention the 4” iPhone 5, which is bigger than 3.5” for the first time since its launch. The general direction seems to be toward bigger and bigger screens, but is that a good thing? Do you miss the good old 3.5” displays, or are you dreaming of using the Galaxy Note 2 as your every day phone? It’s time to make your opinion count. Remember, you don’t have to own a smartphone to have an opinion!

Why are bigger phones better? Why are smaller phones better? Which is the optimum screen size for a smartphone? Tell us everything in the comments!

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Comments (73)
  • Adam

    Why do people need to watch movies on a phone? Youtube clips i understand etc but I don’t need to carry a freaking home theatre system around with me.
    They tend to market the graphics and the audio/headphones.
    They just forget that first and foremost I need something to talk into. The glass just gets pushed against my ear. My day relies more on phone calls than catching up with episodes of Seinfeld in HD. From where I stand, the physical look of current phones is pretty ugly. None of them have any character. The software layouts are hideous (apple got theirs right though I must admit). Nearly every other brand has an interface using icons uglier than clipart drawings. They keep adding features before they have developed the existing ones to their full potential. Just give me a phone that works and I am a happy man. I don’t speak for all men, but I don’t carry a handbag with me day to day, so if it won’t fit in my pocket I am not buying it. I won’t resort to cargo pants either.

  • Somaiya Ebrahim

    i like them big..

    • Peter Pan

      I don’t want a phone that’s the biggest thing in my trousers…lol so 4 is way too big….I was born unfortunate

  • Joe Ingram

    In my opinion, smartphones are not getting too big, I am a person that believes in having as much real estate as possible screen size that is. The larger the screen the less eye strain compared to the old blackberry screens and older phones. I have had just about every smartphone on the market and I love having the larger screens it just give you the ability to see more and do more.

  • Nicole ?

    I suppose if they were to big it would be awkward for people to carry. On the other hand I’d prefer the bigger screen. I have a blackberry curve and in my opinion the screen would benefit from being slightly bigger.

  • Rajaa Chowdhury

    As a everyday requirement of every aspects of human existence is becoming more dependent on a connected world for information at fingertips via the internet, this is a natural and expected trend I presume. Today’s phone requirement paradigm has shifted more from the audio aspect to visual interaction. Also as we notice the gradual miniaturization of the personal computing from a PC / MAC desktops to laptops/notebooks and now the accepted form factors of tablets, and the thin line in differentiation in terms of computing capabilities slowly going away of the powerful smartphones, with these mentioned form factors, it is a natural trend that smartphone screens are going to get bigger and someday the form factor in-between the smartphones of today and the tablets of today, is going to become an accepted norm. This form factor is already a reality and the term phablets have come into existence with the introduction of Galaxy Note and it’s follwing successor the Note II. A new category has been successfully been created and embraced by people, giving the best of both worlds of a smartphone and a tablet. Convergence technology is a way of life and it is witnessed in every aspect of modern technology, so smartphones has also embraced the inevitable in it’s road to evolve into the next generation form.

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This review may contain affiliate links, which pays us a small compensation if you do decide to make a purchase based on our recommendation. Our judgement is in no way biased, and our recommendations are always based on the merits of the items.

For more details, please read our disclosure.
Affiliate Disclamer

This review may contain affiliate links, which pays us a small compensation if you do decide to make a purchase based on our recommendation. Our judgement is in no way biased, and our recommendations are always based on the merits of the items.

For more details, please read our disclosure.