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Having to sign in every time you boot up Windows is a pain. Fortunately, you can actually hide the login screen for good and all it takes is a few simple steps.

First, hit Windows Key + R to bring up the Run window. Type in netplwiz and click Ok. This opens the Advanced User Accounts Control Panel dialog.

In the User Accounts window that pops up, navigate to the Users tab, select your user account, and look for the option called Users must enter a user name and password to use this computer. Uncheck the box next to it and click Apply.

bypass-windows-login

You’ll see a one-time prompt to enter your username and password, and once you enter them, that’s it. You’ll never see the login screen again (until you re-enable the feature, of course).

This solution works on Windows 7 through Windows 10, but it can be a bit of a security risk Windows Users Beware: You've Got A Serious Security Issue Windows Users Beware: You've Got A Serious Security Issue Read More if you’re on a shared computer because it leaves your computer open to unauthorized access. But hey, if that’s a risk you’re willing to take, we say go for it.

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Do you consider the Windows login prompt a useful feature or an inconvenience? Speak up in the comments!

  1. Timothy Vels
    August 6, 2016 at 3:07 pm

    Thanks a lot for this tip. I searched that screen without typing netplwiz in the run command but doesn't seem to exist. Only way to access is that program.

    Thank you very much for this tip

    • Akshata Shanbhag
      August 13, 2016 at 7:30 am

      Good to hear it worked for you, Timothy. You're welcome :)

  2. Andrew Gulak
    October 27, 2015 at 10:30 am

    Thanks so much. Love learning things, and I've been trying to get rid of that since I upgraded!

    • Akshata Shanbhag
      October 27, 2015 at 1:27 pm

      Thank *you* for reading, Andrew!

  3. Adahas Ada
    October 24, 2015 at 1:35 am

    #useful #thanks

  4. Seun Dickson Apeninuola
    October 23, 2015 at 7:29 am

    Very useful... We keep learning new things everyday. Nice one there

    • Akshata Shanbhag
      October 23, 2015 at 7:30 am

      Thank you, Seun :)

  5. MICHAEL VISE
    October 23, 2015 at 2:03 am

    Useful tip thank you so much makeuseof.

    • Akshata Shanbhag
      October 23, 2015 at 7:32 am

      We're glad to hear you found it useful, Michael!

  6. Darryl Gittins
    October 23, 2015 at 1:54 am

    I really doubt this would have any affect on the performance of the machine. And it's simply not true that there is only sort of "communication between it and the Microsoft site at every stage." You likely were experiencing some performance lag due to some process that likely completed by the time you created the new account.

  7. Maryon Jeane
    October 22, 2015 at 2:38 pm

    I've recently started using a tablet with Windows 8.1 as an OS and, frustratingly, I had to sign up for a Microsoft account and enter a password, which was then used mandatorily on the tablet, before I could start using the tablet at all. The tablet ran fairly slowly and it was obvious that there was some communication between it and the Microsoft site at every stage. I found this whole thing unacceptable.

    So, using the full privilege of the Microsoft-approved user account I created a new account and gave it full privileges - but didn't set an access password. Then I deleted the original Microsoft-designated account. The difference was immediate and the tablet now runs well and fast.

    If I am going to be out and about (I work from home so this is the exception rather than the rule) then I can easily set a password before I leave.

    Why does Microsoft have this desire always to designate what its users (and customers) can and can't do?

    • Akshata Shanbhag
      October 22, 2015 at 4:32 pm

      I wonder if there are others who have tried that and got similar results. At least you found a fix, Maryon. But things like that can definitely be annoying.

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