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seamonkey browserCombining a browser, an email client, one of the best free HTML editors out there and even an IRC chat client, SeaMonkey is a program that aims to do a little bit of everything. It may not be a household name like Firefox or Google Chrome, but if you’re looking to combine more for your Internet life into a single application consider this often-overlooked part of the Mozilla family.

Based on code from projects including Firefox, Thunderbird, Chatzilla and more, SeaMonkey is inspired by the all-in-one internet application suites popular early last decade. Think Opera, but open source and compatible with Firefox plugins.


These sorts of applications certainly aren’t for everyone, particularly as more and more people depend on web-based services like Gmail for their email needs. But if the idea of a single, go-to place with a consistent interface to turn to for all things web-related sounds good to you, you should check out SeaMonkey. It works on Linux, Mac and Windows.

The Seamonkey Browser

seamonkey browser

Start up Seamonkey and the first thing you’ll notice is the browser. Used Firefox before? You’ll feel right at home with this browser, then. Based on the world-famous Mozilla engine, the SeaMonkey browser is reliable and decently quick. You can even use most of the Firefox plugins with this browser; keep reading for more information on that.

Email Client

seamonkey web browser

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Again, if you’re familiar with Thunderbird you’ll feel at home with SeaMonkey’s email client. I had to manually configure my Gmail in order for my mail to work, but once I did SeaMonkey provided me with a nice IMAP client. A series of buttons along the bottom of the browser gives me quick access to this and all of SeaMonkey’s additional features.

The email interface is, for the most part, comparable to older versions of Mozilla Thunderbird. You have access to POP and IMAP email accounts along with the usual features: email signatures, formatting and more.

HTML Editor

seamonkey web browser

Also included is a great WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) HTML editor, perfect for making quick changes to HTML files. The tabbed interface gives you access to a preview mode, as well as to the raw HTML code that makes up any given page. If you’re looking for a quick way to tweak an existing page I highly recommend this tool, although I must admit I’m not sure I’d make use of it to build a website from scratch. If you disagree, though, I’d love to hear from you.

seamonkey browser

And More!

If you’re an IRC addict, you should know that SeaMonkey has this capability built in as well. IRC How To Create Your Own IRC Chat Channel How To Create Your Own IRC Chat Channel Read More is probably in decline in our age of social networking gone mad, but it still has a number of core fans so this is a notable feature.

If all of this isn’t enough for you, don’t worry: like any Mozilla-based project there are a lot of plugins to be found. Mozilla hosts an official collection of SeaMonkey plugins which you can find here. Be sure to point out any particularly good ones in the comments below.

Get SeaMonkey

You’ll find your Mac and Windows downloads over at Seamonkey Project. Linux users are best served by checking out their package managers, and Ubuntu users can click here to install Seamonkey.

Do you like this suite of software, or do you prefer to keep your various applications separate? Let us know in the comments below, and also feel free to share your favorite SeaMonkey tips and tricks.

  1. Mjaksen
    November 7, 2010 at 11:44 pm

    Seamonkey 2.x under Linux is ugly and has a retro (some would say clunky) interface. It is also incredibly robust and reliable, having no trouble displaying over 30 tabs and several Youtube videos concurrently. It does things out of the box that Firefox can't. Unlike recent Operas or Firefox, it almost never crashes.

    1. You can pretty it up by installing the Stylish addon. Now you can then easily change the browser's appearance by downloading CSS improvements from http://www.userstyles.org.

    2. You can get the TabsMenu addon, and then hide the TabBar (using a Stylish CSS) and have vertical tabs!

    3. You can get DuplicateTab, RenameTab, ZoomText, ZoomImage, URLTooltips, MultipleSearchEngines etc functionality from bookmarklets floating around the web. My Seamonkey does everything Opera does.

    4. If you're handy with javascript, you can pretty much program Seamonkey to do anything you want it to.

    Conclusion: Not the prettiest browser. Not the most fun. Not the easiest to re-configure. But it does what you want it to with very little fuss. Plus it has that great HTML editor -- I treat it like a lite word processor/webpage designer/blog composer/slideshow creator.

  2. Mjaksen
    November 8, 2010 at 12:44 am

    Seamonkey 2.x under Linux is ugly and has a retro (some would say clunky) interface. It is also incredibly robust and reliable, having no trouble displaying over 30 tabs and several Youtube videos concurrently. It does things out of the box that Firefox can't. Unlike recent Operas or Firefox, it almost never crashes.

    1. You can pretty it up by installing the Stylish addon. Now you can then easily change the browser's appearance by downloading CSS improvements from http://www.userstyles.org.

    2. You can get the TabsMenu addon, and then hide the TabBar (using a Stylish CSS) and have vertical tabs!

    3. You can get DuplicateTab, RenameTab, ZoomText, ZoomImage, URLTooltips, MultipleSearchEngines etc functionality from bookmarklets floating around the web. My Seamonkey does everything Opera does.

    4. If you're handy with javascript, you can pretty much program Seamonkey to do anything you want it to.

    Conclusion: Not the prettiest browser. Not the most fun. Not the easiest to re-configure. But it does what you want it to with very little fuss. Plus it has that great HTML editor -- I treat it like a lite word processor/webpage designer/blog composer/slideshow creator.

  3. Rex
    November 5, 2010 at 6:00 am

    Back in the day, Netscape 4.5 was released as a suite, called Communicator. It couldn't hold a candle to IE4 (yes, it was pretty bad), but I liked the concept of an integrated browser and mail client with HTML editor - the IE world had Outlook Express and Frontpage, but they were all separate.
    Seamonkey brings this together in a modern package based on Firefox 3.5 and Thunderbird 3, and I use it with the old Netscape icons for nostalgia's sake :)

  4. Rex
    November 5, 2010 at 7:00 am

    Back in the day, Netscape 4.5 was released as a suite, called Communicator. It couldn't hold a candle to IE4 (yes, it was pretty bad), but I liked the concept of an integrated browser and mail client with HTML editor - the IE world had Outlook Express and Frontpage, but they were all separate.
    Seamonkey brings this together in a modern package based on Firefox 3.5 and Thunderbird 3, and I use it with the old Netscape icons for nostalgia's sake :)

  5. Geqo7
    November 4, 2010 at 10:46 pm

    Tried to. Type a comment from the android app for the first time, but realised there's a major. Flaw - I can't see what I'm typing!! Please fix this so I can give real comments!

    • Aibek
      November 6, 2010 at 3:12 pm

      we'll look into it

    • ænon1mus
      November 6, 2010 at 3:20 pm

      Just tested it out and it works.

  6. Cal Harris
    November 4, 2010 at 9:49 pm

    I've been using SM since 2004 and I much prefer it to FF (which has become bloated over the last 2 years). Also be careful about using FF plugins in SM, they are NOT the same and you can totally wreck your software, leading to a fresh install.

    You can get the SM plugins here:
    https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/seamonkey/

  7. Cal Harris
    November 4, 2010 at 10:49 pm

    I've been using SM since 2004 and I much prefer it to FF (which has become bloated over the last 2 years). Also be careful about using FF plugins in SM, they are NOT the same and you can totally wreck your software, leading to a fresh install.

    You can get the SM plugins here:
    https://addons.mozilla.org/en-...

  8. Weapon Blog
    November 4, 2010 at 8:30 pm

    One thing to correct you on here... SeaMonkey utilizes some of the same code as Firefox and Thunderbird. But SeaMonkey was around before Firefox and Thunderbird were. It was called Mozilla Suite back then, and Firefox & Thunderbird were branched off the Mozilla Suite code to create standalone browser and mail applications.

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