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macOS is full of handy little applications that perform some of the more mundane computing tasks Your Mac Has Built In Tools For These 10 Everyday Tasks Your Mac Has Built In Tools For These 10 Everyday Tasks Want to dictate notes, look up words, and merge PDFs? Your Mac has in-built tools for these tasks and more! Read More you may encounter. Things like taking screenshots How To Take Screenshots On Your Mac: Tips & Tools How To Take Screenshots On Your Mac: Tips & Tools There are many ways to take screenshots with OS X, using both built-in and third-party tools — each with its advantages and disadvantages. Here's everything you need to know. Read More , making quick screen recordings 7 Handy Tasks QuickTime Player Performs for Free 7 Handy Tasks QuickTime Player Performs for Free You've probably changed the file association so QuickTime never gets used, so you've probably overlooked its bounty of useful features. Read More , and the ability to resize photos.

There are a few ways to resize images on your Mac. You can use the now-defunct iPhoto, its replacement Photos, or the jack-of-all-trades Preview document and image viewer.

For Most Tasks: Resize Using Preview

Preview is a robust application that can be used to do all sorts of things, from viewing images, reading documents and even signing PDFs using your touchpad 8 Ways To Sign A PDF From Windows, Mac & Mobile Platforms 8 Ways To Sign A PDF From Windows, Mac & Mobile Platforms When you get that contract via email, what do you do? You have to print the last page, sign it, scan it, and email it back — surely MakeUseOf, there must be a better way? Read More . One of its most useful features is the ability to resize images, and it’s probably more useful than Photos or iPhoto when it comes to this task.

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Preview does not require you import an image into a library first, and it allows you to unlock the aspect ratio so you can stretch or squish the image if you really want to. For that reason, Preview is probably the best choice when it comes to quick resizing jobs for images other than those in your Photos or iPhoto libraries.

  1. Double click on your image to open it with Preview. You can also select multiple images in Finder and double click your selection to open them all in Preview.
  2. Head to Tools > Adjust Size (remember to select multiple photos using command+click if you want to batch resize).
  3. Use the Fit into box to specify a preset value, or input your own width and height into the boxes provided. Click the padlock to scale disproportionally, which will stretch the image beyond its current ratio.
  4. Hit OK when you’re done, then use File > Save to overwrite, or File > Export to specify a file format and image quality (again, command+click for batch export).

Resize Using iPhoto

Apple replaced iPhoto with their new Photos app in April 2015. You may still have iPhoto available on macOS though, and you can even download it from the Purchases tab in the Mac App Store. If you’re using an older Mac that isn’t compatible with the latest version of macOS, it’s likely iPhoto is all you’ll have available to you.

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In order to resize an image with iPhoto, that image will need to be in your iPhoto library. If you use iPhoto to import your images from an iPhone or digital camera then this is already done. If you’re grabbing an image from the web, the best way is to import it is by dragging the image into an iPhoto window, or its associated dock icon.

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Once you have the image in your library, you can export and resize it as you see fit. iPhoto will maintain the image aspect ratio, so you can’t stretch the image unnaturally.

  1. Launch iPhoto and select your image, or multiple images.
  2. Head to File > Export.
  3. Under Size you can choose Full SizeLargeMedium or Small presets, and Custom allows you to set your own size (in pixels).
  4. Choose Custom to specify a maximum Width or Height, or choose Dimension to limit both width and height to the number you provide.
  5. Hit Export and choose a location in which to save the image.

You can also choose the file type, compression quality, whether or not to strip location information, and set a prefix filename which is handy for exporting a series of images that follow a naming convention — e.g. “beach1.jpg” and so on.

Resize Using Photos

Photos is an iPhoto replacement that more closely resembles the iOS app of the same name. It has been steadily improving since its introduction, and you can even use it to edit RAW photos The Best Free RAW Image Processors For Mac OS X The Best Free RAW Image Processors For Mac OS X Photoshop is expensive, and while many are happy to fork out a monthly fee for Adobe's revised Creative Cloud system, others will always turn to free software first. One thing is for sure: if you're... Read More or import your own custom filters. Resizing an image in Photos is virtually identical to the process used by its predecessor, iPhoto.

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Just like iPhoto you’ll need to import the image into your library before you can do anything to it. Images added from your iPhone, digital camera, or SD cards will already be in your library. Images from the web or other sources will need to be dragged into the Photos window or onto its dock icon first.

  1. Launch Photos and select your image, or multiple images.
  2. Head to File > Export 1 Photo (or however many you are resizing).
  3. Under Size you can choose Full SizeLargeMedium or Small presets, and Custom allows you to set your own size (in pixels).
  4. Choose Custom to specify a maximum Width or Height, or choose Dimension to limit both width and height to the number you provide.
  5. Hit Export and choose where you want to save the image.

You can choose the filetype, compression quality, whether to omit embedded location information, and choose a color profile if you want to.

Note: You also have the option to Export Unmodified Original, which is what you should choose if you’re printing your images or plan on editing them in an external editor like Photoshop or Pixelmator How to Use Photos for OS X With Photoshop, Pixelmator and Other Image Editors How to Use Photos for OS X With Photoshop, Pixelmator and Other Image Editors Get your Photos images into Photoshop, Pixelmator and other applications despite the new restrictions put in place by Apple. Here's how. Read More .

Which Do You Use?

Do you still use a heavyweight like Photoshop to do your resizing, or is Preview good enough for you? Maybe you use a slick Automator script to resize your images? Let us know what you prefer in the comments below!

Original article by Bakari Chavanu.

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