How To Resize Images Using iPhoto [Mac]

iphotologo   How To Resize Images Using iPhoto [Mac]If you ever couldn’t email a digital photo or post it up on a website, typically it was because the image was too large in size. Even a standard 3 megapixel size iPhone photo, with the dimension of 768 x 1024 may be too large for posting on an online forum, though its resolution size may be under 1MB. Or you might try to put a set of 3-5 megapixel photos in a folder but discover they’re too large for emailing. So what do you do?

Well, we have seen earlier that your Mac also gives you three different apps that can help you quickly resize images. But it also helps if you know something about resizing images with iPhoto for various purposes.


The best and fastest way to resize photos on your Mac is to use iPhoto. It’s an application that comes installed in the iLife suite of most new Mac computers. If it didn’t come installed on your Mac, and you don’t think you take enough photos to purchase the application, there are still two other applications, namely Preview, included by default as part of OS X that you can use.

Checking Image Size

With iPhoto 11, you can not only quickly email an image right from within the application, but you can also find out the size of the images you’re resizing. In iPhoto’s menu bar, at the bottom of the application, you need to click the Info button to find out the image type and size of a selected photo, as well as other metadata.

rawsize1   How To Resize Images Using iPhoto [Mac]

In my screenshot above, the image is in RAW format, the largest size format next to TIFF that some digital cameras can produce. Notice the dimensions and actual file size of the photo are much too large for emailing or posting on a website. In order to send an image this size to someone, you would need to post it in a file sharing service like Dropbox so it can be downloaded.

jpegsize   How To Resize Images Using iPhoto [Mac]

Most cameras produce by default JPEG formatted photos, which means that the images are compressed to reduce the size. In the above screenshot, the dimension and file size of the photo is smaller. However, it might still be too large for emailing, especially if you want the receiver of the email to be able to comfortably view the image in their mail application or on an online gallery or forum. So it must be resized.

Mail Resizing In iPhoto

There are two ways to resize images in iPhoto ’11. Again, at the bottom of iPhoto, there’s a Share button, and in the pop-up menu you can select Email. Your selected photo(s) will get resized and placed in a stationary template.

emailsharing   How To Resize Images Using iPhoto [Mac]

You can of course change the template and size of the photo placed in the email.

iphotosizes   How To Resize Images Using iPhoto [Mac]

In my selected photo, the Full Quality Actual Size of the RAW photo is over 7MB. The Large (Higher Quality) size is 797KB, the Medium size is 362.29KB, and the Small (Faster Downloading) size is 281.29KB.

emailiphot1   How To Resize Images Using iPhoto [Mac]

With this method, all you have to do is select the smaller size for emailing, especially since the photo is placed in a stationary template. You can try sending the Full size if you know the receiver wants to reprint the image and has a fast Internet connection to be able to download it.

Export Resizing From iPhoto

If you don’t want to send your selected photo(s) in a stationary template, there are two other ways in iPhoto to resize images. Select File > Export.

iphotkind   How To Resize Images Using iPhoto [Mac]

This method provides a little more control over how you resize your images. In the first pop-up menu, Kind, you can select to change the format of the photo from say RAW to JPEG or PNG, or you can keep it in its Original format. The Current format means that when you import RAW images in iPhoto and then edit them, they will get exported as compressed JPEG images. You wouldn’t want to email or post a RAW image unless you know the receiver could process the image with an image editor like iPhoto or later versions of Photoshop. Most Internet service providers don’t allow for significantly large size attachments in an email.

exprt1   How To Resize Images Using iPhoto [Mac]

If you want the receiver of your image(s) to be able to print your image, you would leave them at the highest quality and size that you possibly can for emailing or posting them to say a photo sharing site. So where it says JPEG Quality, Small would be for emailing and publishing to websites for viewing purposes only. The Medium size is also not for printing, but it provides a higher quality image to recipients who have a fast Internet connection, such as DSL.

The Large size is suitable for printing standard-size photos (2 by 2, 2 by 5, and 4 by 6 inches.) The recipient would need a fast Internet connection, or you would need to post the image(s) on a file sharing service like Dropbox.

The Full size should be used for making high-quality prints of an acceptable size or to post in a web gallery, in which recipients can download and print. Typically, JPEG images this size are a couple of megabytes.

There are other applications, like Photoshop, and Apple’s Preview that provide even more control over resizing photos. For Windows users, check out Simon’s article on resizing photos on Windows.

Let us know how resizing photos in iPhoto works for you. Or if you have found another useful way to resize images, let us know about it.

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6 Comments -

OttifantSir

No resize tool available for Apple’s iPhoto? And it costs money? This really shows that Macheads are just a bunch of cult-mmbers under The Church of Jobs.

And they will now come and defend their precious program, saying it can resize, and how could I not have read the article, just the headline. I DID read the article. There’s two ways this article describes as ways of paying (if you didn’t spend some extra money already when you bought your Mac) to resize your pictures: Email them, or export them. Preferrably to a different format it seems.

But I am not interested in the POSSIBILITY of resizing pictures with iPhoto. Every Apple-fanboy and -girl out there says Mac is SOOOOO easy to use. “You just sit down, and presto!, two minutes later you’re surfing the Web with the same ease as someone who’s spent days, or even weeks, configuring their Windows-PC. And don’t start me on that geek-only OS Linux. Who the h*** wants to mess around with settings on their computer?” I am interested in the USERFRIENDLINESS of iPhoto. And this article shows me iPhoto ISN’T userfriendly. I can’t tell how many times I’ve met limitations on image size online. If I had had a Mac, I wouldn’t have been able to post those pictures.

Macheads again: “But you can just email them to yourself or export them!” Yes, and after a while I might have found out that. But I also have more than 20 years experience with computers, and I know that if you’re looking for a tool, it’s not always obvious, and the menus aren’t there ONLY for the professionals. But, take my family: Mom needed practically a two-day course in using Picasa. My sister doesn’t even know how to install/uninstall a program without a 7-page booklet from me with pictures. My father doesn’t care about computers, except for being pro-Windows. My brother can’t be bothered to learn anything besides setting up Call of Duty and play that. Somehow, they all take pictures and load them onto their PC. Sometimes they upload them, and sometimes they need to resize them.

I know what the reactions would be to iPhoto. Mom: Can you help me resize my pictures? Why do you do that? Why isn’t there a button or choice to resize? (Two days later, on the phone) How did I resize my pictures again? You got to come over and help me. Now. Sis: I tried using it, but I wanted to resize some photos, and couldn’t, so I gave it up. D***! POS program can’t even do that! It was so easy in Windows (Paint.net, Picasa, Gimp, built-in, etc), why is it so hard on a Mac? I’ll never again use ANYTHING from Apple. Dad: What does it do? Show pictures? Can it do more? Email pictures, huh? That’s a nice touch. (Three weeks later, on the phone) My buddy can’t see the pictures, they’re too small. I tried using the other choices, but then he can’t receive my e-mail, it’s too big. Can you help me? Brother: (Six months later) I just tried importing my pictures to iPhoto a few months ago, but something went wrong. I don’t know what, and I haven’t tried anymore since, so I don’t know if it’s fixed or not. (I sit down, he tells me what he did, no problem importing) Huh, guess it’s fixed then. (Three months later) The day after you helped me with iPhoto, I tried importing some other pictures, and the fault came up again. Can you come over some day and fix it again? (I know, importing and resizing are two different things, and importing pictures is available and easy in practically all image editors. But, that’s my brother’s view)

As you can see, there’s a point to this story: I am the geek, and I am expected to know the solution to all their computer problems, even if I, as in the case of Apple-products, have never owned or used any of them. And also, if Macs are supposed to be so userfriendly, then why hide one of the most important and easily implemented features under the un-intuitive heading of Export in a menu. Why not right-click? Oh, that’s right. Macs don’t have two buttons on their mouse. If you want a right-click menu, you have to CMD-Click. (I wonder if that’s the reason why, after 20 years of Windows and Linux experience, when I try a Mac at a computer store, it’s impossible to do anything but look at the background and the dock. I know they’re locked down to some degree, but I should be able to open the programs to see the interface, right?)

(Climbing off my soap box….)

In short: Thanks for showing the world how idiotic Apple is in their GUI-decisions.

Christian Hagen

No resize tool available for Apple’s iPhoto? And it costs money? This really shows that Macheads are just a bunch of cult-mmbers under The Church of Jobs.

And they will now come and defend their precious program, saying it can resize, and how could I not have read the article, just the headline. I DID read the article. There’s two ways this article describes as ways of paying (if you didn’t spend some extra money already when you bought your Mac) to resize your pictures: Email them, or export them. Preferrably to a different format it seems.

But I am not interested in the POSSIBILITY of resizing pictures with iPhoto. Every Apple-fanboy and -girl out there says Mac is SOOOOO easy to use. “You just sit down, and presto!, two minutes later you’re surfing the Web with the same ease as someone who’s spent days, or even weeks, configuring their Windows-PC. And don’t start me on that geek-only OS Linux. Who the h*** wants to mess around with settings on their computer?” I am interested in the USERFRIENDLINESS of iPhoto. And this article shows me iPhoto ISN’T userfriendly. I can’t tell how many times I’ve met limitations on image size online. If I had had a Mac, I wouldn’t have been able to post those pictures.

Macheads again: “But you can just email them to yourself or export them!” Yes, and after a while I might have found out that. But I also have more than 20 years experience with computers, and I know that if you’re looking for a tool, it’s not always obvious, and the menus aren’t there ONLY for the professionals. But, take my family: Mom needed practically a two-day course in using Picasa. My sister doesn’t even know how to install/uninstall a program without a 7-page booklet from me with pictures. My father doesn’t care about computers, except for being pro-Windows. My brother can’t be bothered to learn anything besides setting up Call of Duty and play that. Somehow, they all take pictures and load them onto their PC. Sometimes they upload them, and sometimes they need to resize them.

I know what the reactions would be to iPhoto. Mom: Can you help me resize my pictures? Why do you do that? Why isn’t there a button or choice to resize? (Two days later, on the phone) How did I resize my pictures again? You got to come over and help me. Now. Sis: I tried using it, but I wanted to resize some photos, and couldn’t, so I gave it up. D***! POS program can’t even do that! It was so easy in Windows (Paint.net, Picasa, Gimp, built-in, etc), why is it so hard on a Mac? I’ll never again use ANYTHING from Apple. Dad: What does it do? Show pictures? Can it do more? Email pictures, huh? That’s a nice touch. (Three weeks later, on the phone) My buddy can’t see the pictures, they’re too small. I tried using the other choices, but then he can’t receive my e-mail, it’s too big. Can you help me? Brother: (Six months later) I just tried importing my pictures to iPhoto a few months ago, but something went wrong. I don’t know what, and I haven’t tried anymore since, so I don’t know if it’s fixed or not. (I sit down, he tells me what he did, no problem importing) Huh, guess it’s fixed then. (Three months later) The day after you helped me with iPhoto, I tried importing some other pictures, and the fault came up again. Can you come over some day and fix it again? (I know, importing and resizing are two different things, and importing pictures is available and easy in practically all image editors. But, that’s my brother’s view)

As you can see, there’s a point to this story: I am the geek, and I am expected to know the solution to all their computer problems, even if I, as in the case of Apple-products, have never owned or used any of them. And also, if Macs are supposed to be so userfriendly, then why hide one of the most important and easily implemented features under the un-intuitive heading of Export in a menu. Why not right-click? Oh, that’s right. Macs don’t have two buttons on their mouse. If you want a right-click menu, you have to CMD-Click. (I wonder if that’s the reason why, after 20 years of Windows and Linux experience, when I try a Mac at a computer store, it’s impossible to do anything but look at the background and the dock. I know they’re locked down to some degree, but I should be able to open the programs to see the interface, right?)

(Climbing off my soap box….)

In short: Thanks for showing the world how idiotic Apple is in their GUI-decisions.

Bakari

OttifantSir, I’m not a Mac fanboy trying to defend Apple’s products. There are many times I get just a frustrated as you about why certain features or processes are missing in Apple software, or any software for that matter. As for resizing photos in iPhoto, I’m personally don’t see it as difficult as you describe. I read your comment two times, and maybe I’m missing the point and the specific problem. I apologize for not seeing that.
Why do you find selecting a photo and clicking File>Export, and choosing a resize option as such a huge problem? Could suggest a better way that it could be done? This is a real question, not a defense of Apple. IPhoto is not Photoshop, but on this particular case, I’m sorry but I’m just not seeing your point. Finally, please don’t take my response as one of arguing with you. I’m just trying to get clarity about your concerns.

Egqegwe

It should be as simple as File–>Resize then it takes you to a dialog that says “Height __ PX” and “Width __ PX”

Egqegwe

Even easier, you can use Preview instead of iPhoto, then go to Tools–>Adjust Size. iPhoto is junk

bunny

Actually, even though resizing appears to be simple two-click process in Preview, images continue to PRINT out in the full/original size rather than at the “resize” selected. Does anybody have a solution for that.