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Let me start with a disclaimer: I’ve been a faithful Netflix subscriber for many years. I’m a huge proponent of abandoning cable television Considering Canceling Cable? The True Cost of Cutting the Cord Considering Canceling Cable? The True Cost of Cutting the Cord When you add everything up, do you really save money by cutting the cord? We do the math involved with cancelling cable in favor of Internet services. Read More  and I’ve experienced my share of cord cutting benefits 4 Real Benefits Of Cutting Your Cable Cord 4 Real Benefits Of Cutting Your Cable Cord A few years ago, attending university, I started renting an apartment. I took over the current electric plan and went to a different Internet service provider, but the television provided a bit of a conundrum.... Read More . So this suggestion to avoid Netflix is not coming from an anti-Netflix bias.

The truth is, while Netflix is certainly an amazing and worthwhile service for many people, it may not be the right service for you. Just as there are pitfalls to cutting the cord 7 Pitfalls of Cord-Cutting You Should Consider First 7 Pitfalls of Cord-Cutting You Should Consider First Before you cut the cord to save yourself some money, there are a few things you should be aware of. Read More , there are downsides to Netflix that you might consider to be deal-breakers.

So before you hop aboard the Netflix hype train, take a moment to consider these imperfections.

1. Limited Regional Selections

Of all the drawbacks to Netflix, one is undeniably bad for viewers: The number and quality of movies and TV shows you have access to will depend on where you live.

Even though Netflix is constantly expanding — it recently opened in 130+ new countries Netflix Expands Everywhere, Oculus Pricing Causes Rift... [Tech News Digest] Netflix Expands Everywhere, Oculus Pricing Causes Rift... [Tech News Digest] Netflix is now available in almost every country, the Oculus Rift will cost you $599, Politwoops embarrasses backtracking politicians, Psychonauts 2 is getting made, and Trevor from GTA V is now selling Old Spice. Read More  — it may not be as useful to you as it is to me. I can enjoy the entire U.S. catalog for just $8-per-month, but if you can’t watch the same content, then that $8 cost may not worth it for you.

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There are times when I want to watch something only to find it’s only available on Netflix Canada or Netflix U.K. This happens very rarely, but when it does, it annoys me. I can’t imagine how frustrating it is for people outside of the U.S. wanting to watch Netflix content available exclusively in the United States.

And yes, there are ways to watch everything on Netflix from anywhere in the world How to Watch Everything on Netflix No Matter Where You Live How to Watch Everything on Netflix No Matter Where You Live In this article, we explore why Netflix content differs from country to country, and how you can watch everything on Netflix regardless of where you live! Read More , the most common method being through the use of a VPN — but Netflix is starting to crack down on VPNs Why the Netflix Crackdown on VPNs Will Ultimately Fail Why the Netflix Crackdown on VPNs Will Ultimately Fail Netflix is set to crack down on VPNs to satisfy the rights-holders from whom it sources its content. So, how will Netflix’ ban work? And how effective will it be? Read More , so that method may go extinct soon. You could also try using Smartflix The One App Netflix Fears More Than Any Other The One App Netflix Fears More Than Any Other There's one app that Netflix fears more than any other. It's called Smartflix, and it could be the answer to your prayers. This article examines why. Read More , but that service could itself be killed off at any time.

2. An Outdated Library

The other big complaint about Netflix — which has been one of its sore spots ever since the streaming service went live — is that its library will never really be up-to-date. These days, only Netflix originals 13 New Netflix Originals You'll Be Watching in 2016 13 New Netflix Originals You'll Be Watching in 2016 Netflix has released a lot of original content -- including House of Cards, Orange Is the New Black, Narcos, and Master of None -- but 2016 is slated to be Netflix's most exciting year yet. Read More  can ever be considered timely and trendy.

Due to licensing agreements with TV networks, it doesn’t make sense to let Netflix stream episodes as they’re released on a network (like ABC or CBS) because that would kill any incentive for people to watch the networks themselves. (Although Hulu does offer next-day episodes.)

NetflixOriginal

Netflix’s strength is in binge-watching, which means it’s really good for catching up on TV shows just before the next season begins airing — and that’s why a lot of Netflix’s library is about one year in the past. Networks aren’t willing to let Netflix load up its library with recent content.

Why one year, though? Because that’s when full-season DVD sales are still profitable, and that’s also one reason why films are so late to join Netflix’s library. Publishers only start licensing with Netflix when sales of a season, show, or movie have run their course.

3. Internet Requirements

The thing about Netflix — and any kind of online streaming service — is that the entire service is contingent upon your Internet connection quality. Whether you’re watching YouTube, Twitch, or Netflix, your ISP could be the difference between watching in 240p, 720p, or amazing 4K video 8 Eye-Popping Ultra HD Videos To Watch On Your New 4K TV [Stuff to Watch] 8 Eye-Popping Ultra HD Videos To Watch On Your New 4K TV [Stuff to Watch] We've trawled high and low and found some eye-popping 4K videos that take full advantage of the ridiculous number of pixels at your disposal, for free. Read More .

should-you-buy-a-4k-tv-streaming-netflix

If your Internet goes down, then there’s no Netflix. If people on your network are watching YouTube or playing games, and consequently hogging up bandwidth, Netflix will stutter. And if your Internet speed is bad, video quality will suffer. (Netflix automatically decides stream quality based on the health of your connection.)

Compare that to Blu-ray or DVD: you just pop the disc into the right player and you get the exact same quality all the time, and you can keep watching even if your Internet connection goes out. The value of this reliability cannot be overstated.

4. Data Cap Consumption

While we’re on the topic of Internet connections, let’s not forget that data caps are a very real nuisance to consider when streaming media — especially for videos, which can eat up more than 1 GB per hour depending on how much quality you demand when watching movies and TV shows.

data-cap

Indeed, data caps are a serious threat to services like Netflix. If you have trouble visualizing just how bad the problem is, let’s consider the example of Comcast testing out limits of 300 GB per month Why Do Data Caps Exist and How Can You Bypass Them? Why Do Data Caps Exist and How Can You Bypass Them? ISP and mobile data caps are the bane of everyday Internet users. Why do these exist? Are there any ways you can get around them? Here's what we know. Read More , which amounts to:

  • ~1,000 hours at Low quality.
  • ~425 hours at Standard quality.
  • ~100 hours at High quality.
  • ~40 hours at Ultra HD quality.

Estimates are based on Netflix data usage details.

And these figures assume that you do nothing else besides Netflix. With Ultra HD becoming the norm in home entertainment 7 Home Entertainment Trends to Watch Out for in 2016 7 Home Entertainment Trends to Watch Out for in 2016 There are some key trends happening in the world of home entertainment in 2016. From 4K televisions to virtual reality headsets. And we have the details on them all. Read More , these figures are simply unacceptable. If you have a capped Internet connection, then beware: Netflix will consume your data faster than you think.

5. No Ownership of Media

Of all the reasons not to abandon your CDs and DVDs Don't Sell Your CDs & DVDs! 5 Downsides to Going Digital Don't Sell Your CDs & DVDs! 5 Downsides to Going Digital You name it, there's probably a digital market for it. And while digital is awesome in many ways, it definitely isn't perfect. Here are five reasons why. Read More , this one is the most relevant: even though you pay for Netflix, you don’t own anything on it. If you buy a DVD, it’s yours. With Netflix, your payments disappear into thin air.

This means that after one year, you will have paid anywhere from $96 to $144 depending on which Netflix plan you chose — and have nothing to show for it except the memories of whatever TV shows and films you watched during that time.

drawbacks-digital-ownership

This is one of the big tragedies of joining the streaming generation. We’re starting to see a decline in the ownership of entertainment media The End of Ownership: Netflix, Spotify, and The Streaming Generation The End of Ownership: Netflix, Spotify, and The Streaming Generation Read More , and that puts you at the mercy of content publishers and streamers.

The worst example of this is that shows and films can be pulled from Netflix’s library at any time. Nothing is more irritating than binge-watching a show like Breaking Bad only to find that it’s disappeared when you’re only halfway through.

6. Subscription Value

Netflix encourages binge-watching. In fact, it’s such an integral aspect of the service that the word “Netflix” is pretty much synonymous with “binge-watching” these days. Once you start a show, it’s really hard to stop (not good for those prone to procrastination How To Stop Procrastinating: The Only New Year Resolution You Should Set How To Stop Procrastinating: The Only New Year Resolution You Should Set Kick the habit of procrastination and start taking action without waiting for the right time. Stopping procrastination is the only new year resolution you need. Here's why. Read More ).

Television is also addictive, but it’s much easier to walk away when a show ends because you can’t control when a show can be marathoned or not.

Watch-Netflix-in-Any-Country-Smartflix

And it’s not just because Netflix makes it really easy to move from one episode to the next, although that does play a big part. It’s because Netflix is a subscription service. You pay the same no matter how much watch, so watching more in a month means wringing more value out of your subscription.

On the other hand, if you don’t watch much at all, then Netflix may not be worth the price tag. I mean, if you go a month without watching anything, then you’ve basically thrown away $8. So in a sense, the subscription itself encourages you to binge-watch, which can lead to a tech addiction 5 Ways Technology Might Be Feeding Your Depression 5 Ways Technology Might Be Feeding Your Depression Technology can worsen depression. With tech enveloping our lives, we should be more aware of technology's potential impact on us. There are some things you can do to lessen the burden. Read More .

7. Loss of Channel Surfing

This last point is minor in the bigger picture, but still worth considering if you haven’t cut the cord yet: you can’t surf channels and just watch whatever’s playing. You always have to pick something, and sometimes the picking process isn’t so easy.

Watch-Netflix-in-Any-Country-Unlock

Some workarounds do exist, such as this Chrome extension How to Channel Surf on Netflix, Hulu & YouTube (Like Cable TV) How to Channel Surf on Netflix, Hulu & YouTube (Like Cable TV) Miss the nostalgia of channel surfing cable television? You can still do that with Netflix, Hulu, and YouTube! Read More  that will simulate channel surfing for you based on certain genres, but even those tend to be riddled with bugs and/or veer too far from the real thing. There’s a charm to knowing that a show is playing live, and Netflix doesn’t have that.

For the Most Part, Netflix Is Worth It

Again, let me reiterate that I’m a huge Netflix fan. I’ve been watching it every single day for the past few years and my appreciation of it far outweighs whatever gripes I might have. It’s truly worth it — so much so that we have previously argued why you should be willing to pay more for Netflix Why You Should Be Happy to Pay More for Netflix Why You Should Be Happy to Pay More for Netflix Every time Netflix increases its prices, millions of binge-watching users balk at the prospect of paying a couple of dollars more. But this is dumb, because Netflix is an absolute steal. Read More .

However, if any of the reasons above resonate with you, then perhaps it would be better for you to skip it and move on. If you’re unsure, try the free 30-day trial, but don’t feel bad if you don’t like it. Even the best Netflix features How Netflix Knows Exactly What You Want to Watch How Netflix Knows Exactly What You Want to Watch Netflix's rise to being the world's primary streaming service was no fluke. It was based on a recipe of data and emotion that means the company always knows what you want to watch. Read More  won’t matter if the service is incompatible with your needs.

How well does Netflix fit into your life? Are there any specific gripes you have about the service? If you already subscribe, could you live without Netflix? Please share your thoughts in the comments below!

Image Credits: Pile of DVDs by baitong333 via Shutterstock

  1. WhoCares
    September 26, 2016 at 10:47 am

    Loss of Channel Surfing - Are you serious?
    Netflix encourages binge-watching. In fact, it’s such an integral aspect of the service that the word “Netflix” is pretty much synonymous with “binge-watching” these days. Once you start a show, it’s really hard to stop - Why is that a bad thing?

    This dude works for a cable company!!!

    • Joel Lee
      September 29, 2016 at 12:52 am

      Hey WhoCares, I'm not sure what you're getting at because I actually did say (in section 2) that Netflix's strength is binge-watching! I don't think channel surfing and binge-watching are the same thing as channel surfing is more about flipping through the channels and stumbling across random shows that seem interesting enough to watch.

  2. Jeffrey H
    August 13, 2016 at 11:38 am

    Feels like this was written in direct support of DVD sales or network TV. Most points are just so weak and even off base.

  3. ADAM
    August 12, 2016 at 3:07 pm

    What I miss most, is the potty breaks......lol....with regular TV we got commercials to go to the restroom.....lol..... I don't know I'd consider the whole DVD comparison though......I have too much "stuff" as it is....I'm rather fine "renting" from the cloud......and yes, I will say I do "own" my own house ;) Before someone steps on my toes lol

  4. Mini van Doom
    April 9, 2016 at 2:55 pm

    1. "Due to licensing agreements with TV networks, it doesn’t make sense to let Netflix stream episodes as they’re released on a network (like ABC or CBS) because that would kill any incentive for people to watch the networks themselves."

    This is a GOOD REASON to get Netflix. The fewer people watch television, the less money those pricks make and the more they'll be inclined to either pawn off their stuff to streaming services quickly, or to (in my humble opinion the superior option) just die.

    2. "If your Internet goes down, then there’s no Netflix. If people on your network are watching YouTube or playing games, and consequently hogging up bandwidth, Netflix will stutter."

    What the hell is this? 1996? This is literally a third world country problem. If your garbage government can't keep your anti-trust oversight in check, and you're still on sub 60mbit in goddamn 2016, the answer is not to not get Netflix, it's to man the hell up and change whoever is at the wheel because he's a piss poor driver.

    3. "Data Cap Consumption"

    Dude seriously what? A data cap? Same answer as #2.

    4. "This means that after one year, you will have paid anywhere from $96 to $144 depending on which Netflix plan you chose — and have nothing to show for it except the memories of whatever TV shows and films you watched during that time."

    Let's go crazy and say 144. That's 2 series box sets on blu-ray. In a YEAR. What mongoloid chooses owning and watching two series in a year over the potential thousands upon thousands of hours spent watching the Netflix library?

    I want to see a van Gogh I don't buy one, I pay 5 euros entry to a musuem and revel in the memory, not the possession.

    5. "you can’t surf channels and just watch whatever’s playing"

    What are you, 5? Christ's green asshole man do you need mom to come over and tell you what to put on your bread every morning as well? I've never in my life heard anyone unironically argue that choice is bad. It's like going to a restaurant and complaining when the waiter hands you a menu, then demanding the chef just makes "whatever he feels like".

    What goddamn tool wrote this clickbait piece of crap article? If it wasn't some 55 year old, watching his AMC stock shit itself, tears in his eyes, I'll eat my router and spend a week zapping through bullshit reruns of friends on television, standing up and replaying a hamlet scene every commercial break.

    • Zachary Estle
      August 12, 2016 at 6:34 pm

      Wanting the mega channels to die off is not good for anyone, they provide a ton of content at high quality, and supply a fair amount of Netflix programming. As for data caps and connection, these are valid concerns for those not in metropolitan areas. The ownership of the product is still a fair thought, a small issue for the price, but still it is a thought. As for channel surfing, I actually enjoy that at times, I had forgotten how much as i have had only Netflix for so long that I don't use cable, but used it recently and kinda enjoyed flipping through channels. An extremely minor negative, but the writer made it clear that it was a very minor thought. To go deeper into the internet connection thing, there are worries about this, not even just in rural areas, but for people that cannot afford high speed internet, just because you have the funds and connection doesn't mean everybody does. I live in a city but just a bit outside of the city is a hill area, a friend lives up there and internet connection is simply sad, no matter how much they pay. This article actually isn't bad, and the writer states a few times that certain things are small gripes, and that they really like the service, but when reviewing something, you do have to touch on the things that might be an issue for some people.

  5. Hildegerd Haugen
    April 8, 2016 at 12:36 pm

    Never used Netflix, not worth it here in Norway.

  6. Alan Trinder
    March 30, 2016 at 3:02 am

    WE have only just got Netflix here in Thailand, I have no idea if it will be any good but with luck the trial period will help me decide.
    On a slightly different matter I am not sure if the report is correct in saying you own a DVD / CD. If you do why cant to copy and distribute it?
    Cheers

    • Joel Lee
      April 1, 2016 at 1:59 am

      Can't really answer that, sorry! Digital ownership is a grey area which is why there have been so many lawsuits over the past decade.

  7. Ray Byars
    March 29, 2016 at 2:57 pm

    No one mentioned their DVD at home plan which I also have with the streaming plan and which also has gone downhill. I've been a paying subscriber since inception practically and used to praise them to anyone who would listen. Now, not so much. In the beginning it was the best deal on the planet, hands down. Then the subscription price "doubled". I complained but no doubt, it was still a great deal. At one time I could feasibly receive two DVD's a week through the mail and now it's one if I'm lucky. To me that's like another "doubling" of the price again. Their "value" is continuing to shrink and I would imagine their membership is eventually going to suffer. I suppose their solution will be to raise prices and reduce services "again". Now I'm looking for other options to rid myself of cable (exclusively for my wife) and Netflix. I never imagined me saying that about Netflix but, cable must go first!!! Talk about a real money pit! Cable is the worst. So Netflix, if you're reading this article and comments, please revive the old Netflix and I'll sing your praises for years to come. Otherwise, you'll go the way of the dodo bird.............

    • Joel Lee
      April 1, 2016 at 2:00 am

      I've never used Netflix for its DVD mailing service but those are some interesting points you've made. Thanks for sharing, Ray!

  8. Erin
    March 29, 2016 at 2:54 pm

    The regional variation in libraries is a bit on the painful side. However, overall it's no different to 'normal TV'. Sure, N might not have TV shows I want, but when channel surfing I'm restricted to what's currently being broadcast anyway. Worse, you'll often discover shows halfway through a season, and that's annoying.

    If I decided I wanted to watch Star Trek Voyager right now, Australian Netflix wouldn't be able to help. But nether would Free or Pay TV. So either way, I'd either be buying or renting the episodes/seasons individually. Apart from things like sport and news, Netflix gives you far more content at your fingertips.

    • Joel Lee
      April 1, 2016 at 1:58 am

      Hmm, that's an interesting way to think of it. Food for thought. Thanks Erin!

  9. Eddie G.
    March 29, 2016 at 12:36 am

    I don't have NetFlix, and I live in the US, and I have internet, but I would rather spend my time reading than watching TV for HOURS...on what do they call it? "Binge Watching"? There is nothing that can pique my interest that much that I would watch episode after episode after episode of it. I saw Breaking Bad while it was still on TV, I don't like even watch The Walking Dead and all the other shows that seem to be designed to distract us from REAL LIFE! Its name should be changed from Net-FLIX....to Net-FIX since it seems to be akin to some kind of addictive DRUG that humans can't live without! And when you ad up $8.00 a month over two or three years?...the a,mount of money you could have had coming back to you as a "return" from an "investment" like a Mutual Fund?...it makes Netflix look EXACTLY like what it is...a "virus" that is spreading, along with all the other "distractions" that are out there. DO yourself a favor, ditch Net"Trix", grab a book and learn something, or leave your couch and join the real world again!

    • Joel Lee
      April 1, 2016 at 1:58 am

      There's nothing inherently magical about books. There are good books and bad books, and TV shows can be just as enriching as books.

  10. Suleiman
    March 29, 2016 at 12:11 am

    Wow you just nailed it. They had me run away from them at VPN restriction war. I am in Canada and when you compare what you have in USA and what we have here , it is ridiculous. I had set the Ps4 for Canadian Netflix and the smart TV for USA Netflix using USA VPN. I got 4 view at the same time plan including Ultra HD. We have unlimited Internet at home.
    When Netflix messed up my USA Netflix, I got frustrated. I kept trying to find new VPN addresses. When I get one, it just took Netflix few days to block it. One day I got so mad and I cancelled Netflix for good and replaced it with Kodi. I might not be able to watch kodi on my smart TV or Ps4, but definitely I can screen mirror my phone on my TV and play kodi from my phone. The others in my house have the opportunity to watch kodi on a pc or on one of several laptops we have. You see, I knew about kodi long time ago and I liked it way better than any streaming out there. The reason that I didn't want to make it popular in my house was that I don't want to teach the kids bad habits of getting free stuffs without paying for the service. Eventually I introduced them to kodi and I didn't tell them it costs money or not.
    You said that Netflix would adjust the quality of the video according the interenet connection. So that means if I paid for ultra HD and my connection is considered not good by Netflix, I will get SD or HD but not Ultra HD. Wow that is a rip off just right there! When I learned from you this fact, I felt satisfied that I let go Netflix few months ago. Thank you for this important article!

    • Joel Lee
      April 1, 2016 at 1:56 am

      The regional limits are probably the worst part about Netflix, and the recent crackdown on VPNs is just so terrible (I know they're being pressured into it though). It sucks. Sorry to hear that, Suleiman.

  11. grzz40
    March 28, 2016 at 7:00 pm

    "Netflix encourages binge-watching. In fact, it’s such an integral aspect of the service ... " Right, and one maddening reflection of that is the way N now puts the credits of a show or episode in a thumbnail -- unreadable -- and presumes you want the next episode RIGHT NOW or whatever it has chosen. And it's not easy to get back to the credits, at least not with the interface on Roku. Nor is there any documentation about a work-around, afaik.

  12. Jim Carter
    March 28, 2016 at 6:40 pm

    I unsubscribed mainly because their movie library is shrinking, not growing. I don't care about their original productions. Additionally; I was put off by their tactics with mobile subscribers. That was very underhanded. I'm already a Prime member, so I don't see anything unique with Netflix versus what I have with Amazon. Hulu--on the other hand--distinguishes itself from both Netflix and Amazon.

    • Joel Lee
      April 1, 2016 at 1:54 am

      Netflix has a lot of stuff that Amazon doesn't. Then again, you're probably paying for the free shipping so Prime Video is just a bonus that you're taking advantage of, right? And yup, Hulu has done a great job differentiating itself from those other two!

  13. Howard Blair
    March 28, 2016 at 2:26 am

    "If you buy a DVD, it’s yours."
    Go look at the licensing agreement again; even though the disc is in your hot, sweaty hands, YOU'VE ONLY BOUGHT A LICENSE.

    • l_mckeon
      March 28, 2016 at 10:45 pm

      But you still retain physical possession. It can't suddenly just vanish, never to be seen again, shades of 1984.

      Here 's an article doing the rounds last week,"Netflix’s US Catalog Has Shrunk by More Than 2,500 Titles in Less Than 2.5 Years". That's from about 8100 titles down to about 5500, or a little over one third.

  14. Mary Brady
    March 27, 2016 at 11:06 am

    Thanks. Great look at the downside.

    • Todd Clay
      March 29, 2016 at 2:42 am

      May not disappear but the software to play it may no longer do just that.

    • Joel Lee
      April 1, 2016 at 1:53 am

      Thanks Mary!

  15. John Stranger
    March 27, 2016 at 11:05 am

    There are still people with data cap on landline plans ? Wow.
    Actually the real issue is with the regional limitations. That's just not fair. And all that because the majors want to keep their power on what their customers (we) are allowed to watch...

    • Lard Taco
      March 27, 2016 at 12:51 pm

      Not deep in the say, latest comcast news are we then I take it?
      It's only been one of the top tech news stories for the last year or so.
      Try searching 'Comcast testing data caps' and 'Comcast data cap complaints' and see what you've been missing.
      The *real* issue IS about providers trying to reinstate data caps, it matters, because if you burn up your data just watching Netflix, or whatever service you use, then you've lost your ability to watch regardless of regional choices. Yes, regional choices and almost no up to date content on Netflix are an issue, but if you can't watch them anyway, then there simply is no point.

      Bottom line, companies like Comcast imposing "fairness" data caps, because it's fair to their bottom line, is NOT something that should be overlooked, or we as consumers should be complacent about.

    • Joel Lee
      April 1, 2016 at 1:52 am

      As Lard Taco said, data caps seem to be creeping up on American customers now... and it sucks. The regional limits are a pretty big deal too and I'm really sad that non-Americans can't access the same library that we can. Ugh.

  16. MatsSvensson
    March 26, 2016 at 9:56 pm

    Reason No zeroth, and the only reason you need:

    GIVE US YOUR CREDIT CARD BEFORE WE EVEN TELL YOU ANYTHING AT ALL ABOUT WHAT WE SELL!!

    GIVE US!!
    GIVE US!!
    GIVE US!!
    GIVE US!!
    GIVE US!!

    ...yeah, NO SALE!

    • Joel Lee
      April 1, 2016 at 1:51 am

      That's a pretty common business tactic. Ideal? No. But if you avoided every company who ever did that, I'm pretty sure you'd have nothing.

  17. A41202813GMAIL ..
    March 26, 2016 at 12:22 pm

    Entertainment Is Entertainment Is Entertainment.

    All Countries Have Free To Air Channels ( C ), And Many Of Their Commercials Have An International Target Audience.

    How Many ( C ) Are There In The Whole World - Thousands ?

    How Many Millions ( Billions ) Of **Surfers** Can Pay For A 2Mbps Internet Connection ?

    Why Nobody Has Created A Site To Live Stream All Those ( C ), Without Any Restrictions Whatsoever, As A Cheap Subscription ?

    How Many Millions ( Billions ) Of Willing Customers Could They Serve ?

    Do Not Tell Me There Is No Business To Be Made In Here.

    Cheers.

    • Todd Clay
      March 29, 2016 at 3:11 am

      There's a reason that all the ISP's are trying to cap data because if they don't a few will eat up all the available bits.

      Which brings us to an interesting point. The whole crux of the FCC's decision to not allow fast/slow lanes begs the question what do I have when Verizon offers me only 12mgb/s? While another Verizon customer pays less and only gets 7.5. Isn't that the very thing that's been outlawed?

      And for you techies out there...when I had an analog phone system I never had issues with voice breaking up or having to be slowed down to make room for others on their network but now that we've gone digital it's all becoming problematic. Dish, DTV, Comcast, et el have to compress signals on their TV feeds to be able to serve their customers with all these channels yet in some cases we're paying for HD service are we really even getting HD quality?

      How do you compare an analog phone system which had perfect clarity with a digitized VOIP were you often have drop-off in quality at various times? If I remember right it was Sprint that was the first all digital network with the claim that you could hear a pin drop and yet Sprint isn't doing very well in the realm of communications providers. Why aren't we getting the same quality? And when one side has VOIP and the other side non-VOIP is that still analog or is it converted?

      How do the new FCC rules really impact a Verizon customer, Verizon FIOS customer, Comcast customer, AT&Tverse, etc since each system has limitations and benefits that the other doesn't have? DSL is limited usually based on distance from the central office that you're connected with and the further you are the lower your bandwidth, FIOS would move so fast that I don't think there would be a limit till you go to the "last mile", Comcast has good protected wiring but where each DSL customer has their own circuit Comcast is sharing it's bandwidth between multiple people on a single circuit and they too are only fiber optic in parts of their network but most people I know get about 150mgb/s. If the FCC goal is to have everyone equalized then shouldn't we be paying for our usage rather than available bandwidth which we often don't get the full use of?

      When the FCC talks about the fast/slow lane they discuss it from a business side of view like Amazon can't be faster than Buy.com but on the other side of those connections are users that might be on DSL maxed out at 15mgbs while a Comcast customer may be getting 150mgbs. But those are two major companies what about someone that's setting up their own business? They're not getting that same throughput as Amazon or Buy.com that's connected at by T1 lines. That new business maybe using ADSL getting only 50% of their download speed as uploading speed.

      And to really complicate this what if Comcast doesn't want to provide service to gay people? Is that allowable? We've heard about the people refusing to make cakes for weddings and elected politicians refusing to sign marriage licenses. Can I make gay people go slower than straight people? Or can I choose to slow down people viewing porn vs watching Hula, Netflix?

      • A41202813GMAIL ..
        March 29, 2016 at 6:27 am

        There Is Absolutely No Reason To Have Caps.

        Customers Can Not Abuse The System If They Have Puny Speed Of 1bps ( 1 Bit Per Second ).

        For The Same Contract The Download And Upload Speeds Should Be Exactly Equal.

        Every Contract Should Allow Unlimited Traffic.

        Create Cheap Contracts From Low Speeds ( 1 Bit Per Second ) To, Whatever Fiber Can Give You, Very Expensive Ones.

        Have A Big Choice Of Speeds, And Let Customers Choose The Biggest Speed They Can Afford.

        This Freaking Milking Cows Status Quo Has To End.

        Cheers.

  18. Peter Fitzsimmons
    March 26, 2016 at 12:05 pm

    I spent months trying to work out if Netflix would be worth my while. I pay £7.50 here in the UK, (about $10) and find it just gets better and better.

    I watch more netflix now than I do "normal TV".

    I am currently at the point of convincing the wife to cancel our Sky TV (satellite TV in the UK) and only use streaming services.
    Between Amazon prime, BBC i-player and Netflix I could scrap Sky TV and save myself around £60-70 each month.

    I'd miss sports but I'd rather have and extra £60 in my back pocket.

    Netflix is far from perfect but it suits my TV binge watching needs.

    • Joel Lee
      April 1, 2016 at 1:50 am

      Yes! Compared to cable TV, Netflix is a killer deal. I love being able to watch whatever's available on demand. Like you said, far from perfect but still great. Thanks for sharing, Peter!

  19. StoJa
    March 26, 2016 at 3:17 am

    Jesus...this is the most try-hard, contrarian article ever written. Not everything in life needs an opposite point of view JUST for contrarian's sake. I'd break my fingers if I had to write something like this.

    • StoJa
      March 26, 2016 at 3:19 am

      You need the Internet (duh) and you can't channel surf 8,000 pointless channels. Come on, man....

    • Cinderella
      September 4, 2016 at 9:45 pm

      Aw, c'mon. Break 'em anyway, see what happens. (!)
      But remember, if you break all your fingers you won't be able to watch ANY tv, and then what. (remote controls... require fingers...)

      Personally I enjoyed this article, as it informed me of stuff I hadn't known; I will rethink my decision to sign up. Still trying to understand why you read it, though.

  20. Watcher
    March 26, 2016 at 12:38 am

    I have always been willing to pay more for Netflix because it allowed me to cut the cord on cable and local TV over 7 years ago!

    • Joel Lee
      April 1, 2016 at 1:41 am

      Wow! Cutting the cord is still a bit inconvenient today -- I can't imagine how difficult it must've been 7 years ago. Impressive. :)

  21. Dana
    March 26, 2016 at 12:01 am

    The only real downside in my world is the data cap. My dad complains all the time that we almost go over our data cap, and of course, he blames it on me and my Netflix.

    • Joel Lee
      April 1, 2016 at 1:40 am

      Yeah, unfortunately data caps are a big problem for cord cutters. No wonder so many companies are rushing to add data caps now... Sorry to hear that, Dana!

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