New H.265 Video Format Could Bring 4K To Broadband Connections [Updates]

Ads by Google

The International Telecommunication Union (ITU) announced its approval of the H.265 video format standard on Friday. The new codec may bring 4K video to broadband and also limit bandwidth usage for HD streaming, offering both higher resolution video and lower data use.

As already announced by the Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG) in August of last year, H.265 video is designed to divide bandwidth usage in half. The new format is also expected to allow for true HD streaming in places with low connectivity, mobile phones, and tablets. In areas with sufficient broadband, 4K could also be made available to consumers at a rate of 20-30Mbps.

The new codec is a successor to H.264, a common format used for most videos released and streamed online. H.265 is also known as High Efficiency Video Coding (HVEC).

H.265 was created as a collaboration between the ITU Video Coding Experts Group (VCEG) and MPEG. No information has been released regarding the new video format’s date of availability to consumers.

What are your thoughts concerning the new H.265 format? Do you think it will affect your media-viewing habits? For those of you who have a mobile data cap, will you consider changing your plan?

Source: ITU via Techcrunch

Image Credit: jsawkins

Comments (21)
  • likefunbuntot

    So I’ve actually messed with the h.265 encoder in Handbrake’s nightly builds. If you feed it quality source, like a Blu-ray disc, and a relatively generous helping bits per second (say, 4000) at otherwise default encoder settings, what you get is a file that’s about 20% smaller that takes about 33% longer to encode compared to the h.264 container I’d normally use and with no subjective improvement in quality.

    It’s more useful and powerful at low bit rates (under 1000kbps), where there’s a visible subjective improvement in quality compared to 1000kbps h.264. It’s pretty sweet to get a 40 minute, 150MB 720p video that looks essentially identical to what I could’ve seen on cable TV.

    Right now, I wouldn’t get too excited about it. Hopefully, it will get better with optimization and will represent a clear step forward, but right now it almost seems like the range of applications is fairly narrow.

  • Benjamin Tiessen

    Of course the corporate loot-whores are going to patent it and not make it publicly available ironically defeating the purpose and original intentions of the internet.
    If its not going to be free, i think the entire internet should fight against standardizing it.

  • Abdul Kareem

    Any timeline given regarding general availability to developers and public? This is definitely the next big thing in online video.

    • likefunbuntot

      You can get it right now in Handbrake’s nightly builds for Linux or OSX. IIRC it’s not packaged with Windows or Windows is missing libraries to make it work.

  • Mike Case

    This could be excellent!

  • Ramesh Krishna

    Awesome to format for faster internet speed

Load 10 more
Affiliate Disclamer

This review may contain affiliate links, which pays us a small compensation if you do decide to make a purchase based on our recommendation. Our judgement is in no way biased, and our recommendations are always based on the merits of the items.

For more details, please read our disclosure.
Affiliate Disclamer

This review may contain affiliate links, which pays us a small compensation if you do decide to make a purchase based on our recommendation. Our judgement is in no way biased, and our recommendations are always based on the merits of the items.

For more details, please read our disclosure.