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Microsoft’s recent demo of Windows 8 unveiled a big change – an entirely new interface. Clearly inspired by the Metro UI currently used by Windows Phone 7 Turn Your Android Phone Into A Windows 7 Phone With Launcher 7 Turn Your Android Phone Into A Windows 7 Phone With Launcher 7 Although not as popular, the smaller mobile OS options have their own unique traits. Windows Phone 7, for example, has a unique "Metro" interface that is excellent in most every way. It’s beautiful, it’s simple,... Read More , the demo of Windows 8 featured colored tiles that display information such as emails, stock activity and the user’s calendar. As with WP7, these tiles can be customized by the user to show whatever content he or she demands.

Windows 8’s new interface arrived alongside an announcement that the new interface would focus on apps developed with HTML5 10 Websites to See What HTML5 Is All About 10 Websites to See What HTML5 Is All About Read More and JavaScript What is JavaScript and How Does It Work? [Technology Explained] What is JavaScript and How Does It Work? [Technology Explained] Read More , a change that should make cross-platform app development easier.

Touch gestures are central to the new tile interface. Besides the standard swipe-to-navigate and pinch-to-zoom gestures, Microsoft showed off touch-based “snap” multi-tasking that allows users to have multiple applications on-screen simultaneously and control the amount display real-estate available for each.

Although the new user interface was a central part of the Windows 8 demo, Microsoft made it clear that this is not a replacement and in fact switched between the tiles and the more traditional Windows desktop multiple times. Moving from one to the other appeared smooth, and the presenters stressed that they are not designing Windows 8 as if it has two separate interfaces, but instead working on synergy between the two. This means that both interfaces work with both touch and keyboard/mouse input.

What do you think of the current design of Windows 8?  Are you excited by the possibilities or totally appalled?  Let us know what you think in the comments.

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Source: All Things D

  1. Ken H
    July 13, 2011 at 6:19 pm

    The last computer I bought was an all-in-one that happened to have a touchscreen enabled.  The first thing I did was to disable the touch!  Too many times, when more than one person is looking at the screen, someone will touch it--causing undesirable things to happen.  I agree with Xoandre... Touch is ok for phones and tablets, but not for your main PC.

  2. Xoandre Moats
    June 16, 2011 at 3:07 am

    Another reason Windows7 will be used far into the future... There is NO WAY you will ever get Graphic Designers like myself or animators to use that interface. It might be great for tablets and phones, but NEVER for desktop PCs.

    • Uday Choudhary
      September 8, 2011 at 6:51 pm

      The time is not far, maybe in the next 5 years, touch screens will replace traditional monitors/LCDs/LED screens.

      My desire for a long time was for such touch interfaces to replace the mouse and key-Board.  and I have been using this M&K interface for over seven years now.

  3. Anonymous
    June 15, 2011 at 4:19 pm

    This is gross.

    • M.S. Smith
      June 15, 2011 at 4:46 pm

      Don't be too concerned. The "normal" Windows interface is still there as well. 

  4. Anonymous
    June 15, 2011 at 4:17 pm

    Haha. Fail. Linuuux alll the way.

  5. Scutterman
    June 15, 2011 at 12:45 pm

    Hmm, touchscreen. Looks like it's even less likely they'll be doing some much needed work on multi-monitor support/features.

  6. Susendeep Dutta
    June 15, 2011 at 9:39 am

    The current design of windows 8 is NUI(natural user interface) based.It will play good with touch based system.Waiting to see desktop version.

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