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It wasn’t so long ago that tabbed browsing didn’t exist. If you wanted to open a website but you didn’t want to leave the website you were viewing you had only one option – open a new window. Tabbed browsing was first made popular by Firefox, and it has caught on. Now every browser uses tabs in order to display multiple websites at once, including Opera Opera 10 Browser Review: 6 cool features that make it stand out Opera 10 Browser Review: 6 cool features that make it stand out Read More .

Opera is a bit different from Firefox 5 Effective Ways to Deal With the "Too Many Tabs" Syndrome in Firefox 5 Effective Ways to Deal With the "Too Many Tabs" Syndrome in Firefox Read More and others, however. Or rather, it is a bit more advanced. While other browsers offer tabbed browsing, they treat each individual tab as a separate entity. You can display one tab at once. Opera, however, uses tabs like windows inside the browser. In this tutorial we’ll take a look at four ways to use advanced Opera tab features in order to make browsing the web easier.

1. Pin Tabs

Opera has the ability to pin tabs to the taskbar. This can be accomplished simply by right-clicking on an Opera tab and then clicking Pin Tab. When a tab is pinned, it no longer has an X on the right side of the tab which can be used to close the tab. Instead it has a magnifying glass symbol.

Using the Pin Tab function allows you to make websites you visit very frequently, such as your search engine or a web-based email client, a permanent fixture in your web browser. When you use Pin Tab on a website in Opera it becomes permanent even if you close Opera. The website will still be pinned when you open Opera later.

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2. Using Follower Tabs

The follower tab is a feature unique to Opera. You can create a follower tab by right-clicking on a current tab in the taskbar and then clicking Create Follower Tab. The follower tab will be blank when it first opens, but now any link you click on in the original tab will no longer open in that tab. Instead it will open in the follower tab.

Follower Opera tabs are handy when you are browsing a website and blog and you want to check out multiple articles. For example, let’s say you’re browsing Makeuseof.com and you found a post you want to read. However, you want to keep browsing the main page as well. You could use the follower tab feature to make browsing easier. When you find a post to read, simply click on it to open it in the follower tab. The functionality of the follower tab can also be achieved by simply opening new tabs, but the follower tab streamlines the process so that you are not constantly opening and closing tabs.

3. Cascading and Tiling Tabs

opera tabs

Opera tabs are unique from other web browsers in that they act more like windows than tabs, making the taskbar label of Opera’s tab manager very appropriate. The difference in how Opera handles tabs isn’t evident at first, but it becomes obvious when you right-click on a tab and then go to the Arrange section. Here you’ll find options on how to manage tabs in the Opera browser’s space.

From this menu, you can minimize or maximize all of your tabs. The more interesting options, however, are the Cascade, Tile Vertically and Tile Horizontally options. You can use this feature to tile all of your open tabs inside the Opera web browser. This feature can be used to easily arrange multiple websites so that they can be read together. It can also be used to pick out which tab you want to read, as you maximize any of the tiled tabs so that they take up the entire browser space.

4. Use Session Management

opera tabs

Opera has a built-in session manager by default. A session manager is a feature which can save all of the tabs which you are currently working on for later use. You can re-open these tabs at any time through the session manager.

To try it, open a few tabs. Then click on the Opera menu button in the upper left hand corner of the browser. Go to Tabs and Windows > SessionsSave This Session. Name the session and un-check the “Show these tabs and windows every time I start Opera” checkbox. Then click okay. Now close all of your open tabs.

Once all tabs are closed, go back to the Sessions menu. You should see the session you saved as a selection in the menu. If you click on it all of the tabs you had open will re-open, letting you pick up where you left off.

Conclusion

These tab management features should make using tabs in Opera much easier, and they are features which, for the most part, other browsers cannot yet emulate. Once you know how to use Opera tabs, you’ll find that certain tasks, such as researching multiple websites or browsing blogs, is easier in Opera than in other browsers.

  1. Checker
    August 1, 2010 at 9:27 pm

    No but it doesn't need an add-on either.
    http://www.fanboy.co.nz/adbloc...

  2. Pramod Rawat
    July 3, 2010 at 10:20 am

    All the inovative features firstly was invented by opera (integrated mail client, irc, speed dial, etc.)

    Siddha kshetra Digamber jain tirth Ahar ji tikamgarh

    http://bundelkhanddarshan.com/...

  3. Pramod Rawat
    June 30, 2010 at 11:09 am

    It seems that Opera wasn't the first one to introduce it ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T... ), but I'd go and say that in terms of adopting tabbed browsing, Opera was the one that popularized it.
    http://www.bundelkhanddarshan....

  4. Pramod Rawat
    June 30, 2010 at 11:08 am

    you can get your proper answer on the site of which is given below.

    http://www.bundelkhanddarshan....

  5. Pramod Rawat
    June 30, 2010 at 9:09 am

    It seems that Opera wasn't the first one to introduce it ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tab_(GUI) ), but I'd go and say that in terms of adopting tabbed browsing, Opera was the one that popularized it.
    http://www.bundelkhanddarshan.com

  6. Pramod Rawat
    June 30, 2010 at 9:08 am

    you can get your proper answer on the site of which is given below.

    http://www.bundelkhanddarshan.com

  7. pseudoscion
    June 21, 2010 at 10:02 am

    Yes I am an Opera user, but I only use it because it suits me the best. I have used others over the years when Opera fell behind or got buggy. But seriously do authors not do a little background research before writing an article, or even read over their work before publishing.
    I'm not trying to bang on about Opera being the best or fastest or whatever but the article does imply that Opera copied Firefox, or other browser, by implementing Tabs when that is not the case. In fact there is some debate as to whether Opera did in fact invent Tabs first, although it did have them way before any of the current range of browsers.
    Also a pinned tab is marked with a "magnifying glass" symbol. I mean come on. Yes it may look like a magnifying glass, but it also looks just like a pin, and it’s on a pinned tab so a bit of common sense would tell you which to opt for.

  8. Anonymous
    June 21, 2010 at 8:02 am

    Yes I am an Opera user, but I only use it because it suits me the best. I have used others over the years when Opera fell behind or got buggy. But seriously do authors not do a little background research before writing an article, or even read over their work before publishing.
    I'm not trying to bang on about Opera being the best or fastest or whatever but the article does imply that Opera copied Firefox, or other browser, by implementing Tabs when that is not the case. In fact there is some debate as to whether Opera did in fact invent Tabs first, although it did have them way before any of the current range of browsers.
    Also a pinned tab is marked with a "magnifying glass" symbol. I mean come on. Yes it may look like a magnifying glass, but it also looks just like a pin, and it’s on a pinned tab so a bit of common sense would tell you which to opt for.

  9. pceasies
    June 21, 2010 at 12:19 am

    Very nice. I've always like Opera, but ended up using Firefox (and now Chrome) for it's superior addon support.

    • Edmenje
      June 21, 2010 at 2:41 am

      Yeah, but all the addons are simply ways for those browsers to get functionalities that Opera has out of the box. I've been using Opera since v 3.x and all of the features in this article (with the possible exception of pinning) have been in Opera from all the way back then. The only time I use other browsers is for checking webpage display and a few functions only supported in FF or IE on certain sites.

      • Hblair66
        June 21, 2010 at 11:58 am

        Opera has AdBlock Plus built in? Wow.

        • Edmenje
          June 22, 2010 at 2:15 am

          ever heard of a HOSTS file? Multiple browsers, one ad-blocking solution.

        • Ismoph
          June 23, 2010 at 5:36 pm

          Actually Opera handles ad blocking much better. You just take or make a blocking list and put it in urlfilter.ini file. Plus you can control ads on the site basis.

        • Checker
          August 1, 2010 at 7:27 pm

          No but it doesn't need an add-on either.
          http://www.fanboy.co.nz/adblock/opera/

  10. M.S. Smith
    June 21, 2010 at 1:07 am

    Right. The point isn't who invented it. The point is who made it popular. Opera has always been very obscure, so innovations made by the browser only become popular once another browser picks the feature up.

    It is unfortunate (for Opera) but Opera has always been a little bit ahead of its time. That's great from a technical standpoint, but it makes Opera rather intimidating to the average user.

  11. gnargl
    June 20, 2010 at 10:32 pm

    The author doesn't attribute the invention of tabbing to Firefox, true; however, he strongly implies that Opera is just another browser using this feature, while tabbing was indeed invented by Opera. Credit where it's due would be nice in this instance.

    Plus, one definite error (and a weird one, too: When you PIN a tab, it is not marked with a "magnifying glass symbol" but with a PIN (get it?). How such a mistake can happen is beyond me...

  12. gnargl
    June 20, 2010 at 8:32 pm

    The author doesn't attribute the invention of tabbing to Firefox, true; however, he strongly implies that Opera is just another browser using this feature, while tabbing was indeed invented by Opera. Credit where it's due would be nice in this instance.

    Plus, one definite error (and a weird one, too: When you PIN a tab, it is not marked with a "magnifying glass symbol" but with a PIN (get it?). How such a mistake can happen is beyond me...

    • M.S. Smith
      June 20, 2010 at 11:10 pm

      The icon is basically a circle with a stick hanging off one end. The round-headed pin makes more sense now that you mention it, but really, it also looks a lot like a magnifying glass.

  13. Sandro
    June 20, 2010 at 8:06 pm

    All the inovative features firstly was invented by opera (integrated mail client, irc, speed dial, etc.)

  14. Somesome
    June 20, 2010 at 9:43 pm

    It seems that Opera wasn't the first one to introduce it ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T... ), but I'd go and say that in terms of adopting tabbed browsing, Opera was the one that popularized it.
    Or perhaps I'm just biased as a avid Opera user :)

  15. Ian H.
    June 20, 2010 at 7:34 pm

    Isn't the follower tab functionality basically the same as middle-clicking a link?

    • pceasies
      June 21, 2010 at 12:22 am

      Yes, but laptops don't have middle click functionality (although you can ctrl-click). Also notebooks mouses seem to have really stiff scroll clicks as well.

  16. Dneill
    June 20, 2010 at 5:03 pm

    Actually all "innovations" in one of the popular browsers were introducted by Opera. Really, all of them.

  17. Murugesan
    June 20, 2010 at 4:39 pm

    Opera was the first browser to introduce Tabbed browsing. First sentence of this article is totally wrong. This may be corrected.

    • Vasember
      June 20, 2010 at 6:11 pm

      The author didn't say that Mozilla invented tabbed browsing. You should read the article again this time more carefully

      • Somesome
        June 20, 2010 at 7:43 pm

        It seems that Opera wasn't the first one to introduce it ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tab_(GUI) ), but I'd go and say that in terms of adopting tabbed browsing, Opera was the one that popularized it.
        Or perhaps I'm just biased as a avid Opera user :)

      • M.S. Smith
        June 20, 2010 at 11:07 pm

        Right. The point isn't who invented it. The point is who made it popular. Opera has always been very obscure, so innovations made by the browser only become popular once another browser picks the feature up.

        It is unfortunate (for Opera) but Opera has always been a little bit ahead of its time. That's great from a technical standpoint, but it makes Opera rather intimidating to the average user.

      • paparozoumis
        July 24, 2010 at 12:25 pm

        But he has worded it incorrectly by saying that Opera followed mozilla, which is first class BS

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