Linux Live USB Creator: Easily Boot Linux From Your Flash Drive

LogoText   Linux Live USB Creator: Easily Boot Linux From Your Flash DriveTrying out Linux should be easy; with the help of Linux Live USB Creator it is. Quickly get any Linux distribution to boot from your USB key, complete with a persistent mode for keeping applications and documents in place. You can even install a portable version of Virtualbox to your USB key so you can run Linux comfortably from within Windows.

With support for a shockingly high number of Linux distributions and an easy-to-use Windows interface, Linux Live USB Creator makes the creation of USB boot disks effortless. From downloading the ISO to formatting your drive, there’s not much about USB booting this application doesn’t make easier than similar software.


Feel free to download Linux Live USB right now, and keep reading for an overview of the program.

5 Simple Steps

First things first: fire up the program. You’ll see 5 sub-windows, representing the five steps to making a Live USB key. The first is simple enough:

lili 1key1   Linux Live USB Creator: Easily Boot Linux From Your Flash Drive

That’s right: you need to pick which key you want to boot Linux from. Once you’ve done this, pick the version of Linux you want to boot. If you’ve got an ISO or a CD handy you can use that, or you can pick from many downloadable distros:

lili 2source   Linux Live USB Creator: Easily Boot Linux From Your Flash Drive

If you select a distro from this list the program will take care of downloading the ISO for you:

lili download   Linux Live USB Creator: Easily Boot Linux From Your Flash Drive

So far, so good. If you want your key to keep downloaded programs and documents in place, you’re going to want persistence mode. This is step 3; simply scroll to leave room:

lili 3persistence   Linux Live USB Creator: Easily Boot Linux From Your Flash Drive

Step four is optional, but includes some handy tools:

lili 4options   Linux Live USB Creator: Easily Boot Linux From Your Flash Drive

Here you can choose to hide the created files on your key from being seen by Windows, useful if you plan to use your key for more than just booting Linux. You can optionally format the drive you’re writing to, and choose whether or not you want your Linux distro to be loadable in Windows.

Once you’re done you can click the lightning bolt in the fifth box to start the creation of your live CD. Congratulations; you’ve got yourself a bootable USB key.

Live Virtual Machine

The options include a step for launching your key in Windows. What is that about? Well, once your disk is created, open it up in Windows Explorer. You’ll find a new file that looks like this:

lili virtual   Linux Live USB Creator: Easily Boot Linux From Your Flash Drive

You can click this to boot your Linux distro without rebooting Windows, which is handy from time to time. Naturally you’re going to want a pretty powerful computer to try this out, but it’s a nice added touch.

Supported Distros

Wow. Just, wow. This program supports the automatic downloading and installation of many different Linux distributions. Highlights include:

There’s more; check out Live Linux USB’s official list of Linux distros for a complete list.

Conclusion

Linux Live USB isn’t the first program to help users make live USB keys; uNetBootin does the same job. What Linux Live USB does better than this program is make the process painless. It’s worth checking out just for that, but according to blog OMG Ubuntu, this program works more consistently than others. So it’s easier and better.

Do you like this tool? Let us know in the comments below. Also feel free to share other tools for the job, and to discuss your favorite Linux distributions.

The comments were closed because the article is more than 180 days old.

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12 Comments -

Gregsha

According to Immunet, you also get a free VIRUS with the download.
W32.SPERO.FakeAV.02.08.11

Thank you, IMMUNET PROTECT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1

Mike

The official LiLu download is clean (http://cl.ly/3T1t0X0p0s2K0A2O2r0T)

If you tried uNetBootin there is a chance that some AV tools detect a Trojan or something because of the install mechanism. If you think it’s a false-positive you should contact Immunet about it.

jhpot

Yeah, I’m pretty sure that’s a false positive. And I’ve never heard of Immunet; is it any good?

Mike

Immunet is pretty decent.
It’s a “cloud based community driven” AV tool which benefits of ClamAV as an offline engine [sort of backup engine]. Basically you get the benefits of the cloud (like Panda Cloud Antivirus) and the insurance of ClamAV (regular updates, offline scanning).

You should give it a try.

Mike

The official LiLu download is clean (http://cl.ly/3T1t0X0p0s2K0A2O2

If you tried uNetBootin there is a chance that some AV tools detect a Trojan or something because of the install mechanism. If you think it’s a false-positive you should contact Immunet about it.

Martha Gr

thanks for an article, i was just looking for a solution like this yesterday.

Mike

It’s a very nice app but I cant make it work.

The installed system (Ubuntu) boots when I run the virtual version inside Windows but when I boot from the key it just displays a single line of text on a black screen and then nothing happens. It might be looking for some essential files on the internal hd and not on the usb. This happens when I run Puppy Linux from (a different) usb; I have to enter “pmedia=usbflash” otherwise it only searches the internal hd for the necessary files. (I used Unetbootin to create the Puppy usb as it didn’t have to be persistent.)

Unfortunately it’s not possible to enter something similar when the usb is created with Lili, it doesn’t even return an error message.

Or is it?

Mike

It’s a very nice app but I cant make it work.

The installed system (Ubuntu) boots when I run the virtual version inside Windows but when I boot from the key it just displays a single line of text on a black screen and then nothing happens. It might be looking for some essential files on the internal hd and not on the usb. This happens when I run Puppy Linux from (a different) usb; I have to enter “pmedia=usbflash” otherwise it only searches the internal hd for the necessary files. (I used Unetbootin to create the Puppy usb as it didn’t have to be persistent.)

Unfortunately it’s not possible to enter something similar when the usb is created with Lili, it doesn’t even return an error message.

Or is it?

jhpot

I can’t see a way to do this with LiLi, but it is a pretty young project. I suggest you leave them some feedback on their site, but for now stick with uNetBootin.

Mike

Immunet is pretty decent.
It’s a “cloud based community driven” AV tool which benefits of ClamAV as an offline engine [sort of backup engine]. Basically you get the benefits of the cloud (like Panda Cloud Antivirus) and the insurance of ClamAV (regular updates, offline scanning).

You should give it a try.

Fulloftests

It is a virus actually…wait a couple of days for it initiate on your unit.

jhpot

What does it do? If this is true we should really alert LiLi, because they put out a solid product and I’m sure this is a mistake.