Software Piracy – The Untold Tales [INFOGRAPHIC]

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Piracy and illegal file sharing is a curse for any developer and software company. As soon as the new version of a popular piece of software hits the streets, it is pretty much being pirated before you can say “o-arrr!”. Same with games, music and movies. For every person who buys something legally, there’s probably 10 who are taking the risk of stealing it.

Our infographic this week is on this very subject and comes courtesy of Starmedia. It goes all the way back to the swinging 60’s when the first software patent was granted and to 1975 when the first software piracy cases occurred. Even before the Internet was around, piracy was a huge problem but with the introduction of the net, the problem just exploded.

Finally, the infographic looks at some illegal download stats. Did you know the most pirated piece of software is Photoshop, and that Adobe loses potential revenue of more than $18.5 million a day due to piracy?

Let us know in the comments what you think of the infographic. Does piracy have any hidden advantages for companies or is it just plain stealing no matter which way you look at it?

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Comments (33)
  • James Bruce

    An interesting idea, but I don’t really think it would prevent piracy. It also wouldn’t really be feasible with products like Adobe Photoshop that don’t change an awful lot from verison to version. 

    I’m pretty sure there is no ‘solution’ to piracy at the end of the day. In fact, I doubt there’s even a ‘problem’ in the first place. 

  • Johnpendlebury15

    All Retail Outlet’s (Shops etc.) , allow for the Five-Finger discount (Shoplifting) , in the
    prices they charge . ‘Lost revenue’ has already been covered by those that pay for the
    goods . Digital piracy is just another form of Shoplifting .

  • Aibek

    there are some good premium software that doesn’t have free counterparts. Mosly these are products for small businesses.
    These are Basecamp, Aweber, Pingdom, some Zoho offerings etc etc

    Aibek

  • Nala_kcirtap

    I get ramped on this so excuse me while I go off a tad bit.

    Piracy is theft, plain and fancy. Somebody spent a lot of time and effort developing something worth all that time and energy.
    Some developers give it as freeware, some as donorware, some as shareware, some give you a trial period, which is cool all the way around, and some want $$ right off the getgo – so? time is money, so ‘They’ tell me. 

    How much time do you think was spent putting something like that together so it would work?

    What’s right with stealing? If I planted a garden, did all the gardening stuff all growing season, by my self and the ‘sweat of my brow’, and caught your sneaky lil’ butt ripping off my goodies I’d get PO’d and you might get a rocksalt energy boost.  

    Piracy is stealing. Do you you feel is right.

    • James Bruce

      Bad analogy, sorry. If someone was taking the fruits of your labor from your garden, you would be losing them. Not true with piracy. You cannot equate piracy with ‘stealing’. It isn’t, so stop basing your whole argument on it. 

      Here’s a better ‘gardening’ example for you. A multinational company creates a super high yield wheat crop, but sells the seeds at ridiculously high rates that put it out of the hands of third world subsistence farmers. A lot of work went into the product, and they deserve to make money for their creations. A white-hat hacker from India breaks into the servers and ‘copies’ (notice I said copy, not steal) the genetic code for the high yield crop, then releases it on the various local third world sites. Enterprising young fellows there make use of the new low-cost genetic code adjusters to create these high yield seeds and give them away to impoverished farmers there. 

      Do you count that as stealing? They couldn’t have possibly paid for those seeds in the first place, and they didn’t actually steal anything in the sense that the company never lost any revenue nor physical product. In fact, once the farmers in the rest of the world saw how amazing the crop was for these third world countries, they decided to pony up the cash and finally buy some of them for themselves. Of course, they paid because they *could* afford it, thanks to EU subsidies on farming that made the purchase a viable option. 

      There, I fixed your analogy. ;)

  • Terry

    $999 Software pirated != $999 “Lost Revenue”!

         As a software developer and former graphic artist I don’t agree with piracy, however many media companies go way too far. Overly exaggerate their “lost revenue” most of the copies of pirated stuff would NEVER be purchased at full retail by the people who pirate them. This is especially true for software that costs hundreds of dollars pirated by people in third world countries where the price is comparable to the wages they earn in an entire lifetime. There is no “Lost Sale” in most piracy cases and hence no “lost revenue” in most cases. Furthermore piracy is best defeated through changing the social view of it instead of the common method of adding hinderences for the paying customers.

         I don’t “share” my purchases and I refuse to buy hardware, software or media including audio books and ebooks where my use is hindered. When it comes to my wallet:
    DRM = “Lost revenue”.

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Affiliate Disclamer

This review may contain affiliate links, which pays us a small compensation if you do decide to make a purchase based on our recommendation. Our judgement is in no way biased, and our recommendations are always based on the merits of the items.

For more details, please read our disclosure.