Facebook Psychology – Is Addiction Affecting Our Minds? [INFOGRAPHIC]

Ads by Google

Internet Addiction Disorder (otherwise known as Facebookalitis) is set to become the big psychological disorder of the 21st century – and it seems we have mostly Facebook to thank for that. Thanks to the social media goliath, it seems that we are turning into a legion of junkies who salivate whenever we hear the sound of a new status notification arriving or a Friend Request being approved.

The following infographic examines what Facebook, and the Internet in general, is doing to our minds. Every new status update is like snorting crack cocaine apparently, only cheaper, (unless your ISP has suddenly decided to put their prices up to compete with the drug barons). We just can’t get enough of the Facebook stuff. But Facebookalitis is also apparently responsible for rewiring our brains and making them shrivel up. Something cheerful to think about, next time you’re on Facebook uploading a picture of your lunch.

The problem has become so serious that Internet Addiction Disorder is set to become officially recognised as a “psychological diagnosis”. Although I think it would be pretty easy to diagnose someone if they are sitting in the psychiatrist’s office updating their Facebook wall to tell everyone they are in the psychiatrist’s office.  And they send the psychiatrist a Friend Request.

Let us know in the comments what you think of the infographic. Do you think you’re turning into a slobbering incoherent vegetable because of the Internet, and Facebook in particular? Or is it all just a theory, like global warming?

Infographic Source: www.bestmastersinpsychology.com
Image Credit: Stressed Girl Dragged From Her Computer via Shutterstock

Join live MakeUseOf Groups on Grouvi App Join live Groups on Grouvi
Awesome Websites
Awesome Websites
137 Members
Deep Web Communities
Deep Web Communities
80 Members
Best Anonymity Tools
Best Anonymity Tools
73 Members
Tips for Privacy Obsessed
Tips for Privacy Obsessed
44 Members
Best Music Services
Best Music Services
43 Members
Online Security Tips
Online Security Tips
41 Members
Can't Live Without WhatsApp
Can't Live Without WhatsApp
36 Members
Facebook Addicts
Facebook Addicts
35 Members
Web for Kids
Web for Kids
32 Members
Graphic Design
Graphic Design
31 Members
Ads by Google
Comments (42)
  • Mary Grace

    Tonight, my husband of almost 40 years was relaying his account of a conversation he’d just had on the phone with an old friend of ours. When I broke in with a question/observation about some detail of the conversation he’d had with our friend, my husband became upset. “I was telling you something. I simply wanted to share a story. I didn’t want to have a conversation about it!” I became upset by this response. “You have to make room for some interaction when telling a story. Or, is it a siloquilille? (sp? It’s midnight and I’m too tired to spell!)? We both became frustrated with the other until I verbalized the realization that the problem we were having was more than our relationship! He didn’t get my point and only grew more irritated and impatient with the direction our conversation was taking. What was happening to two people who had decades of experience easily sharing ideas and communicating with each other? Quite simply, IAD, Internet Addiction Syndrome. My husband is in a lot of pain with degenerative spine disease and can’t stand very long or walk much. He wasn’t going to sit around doing nothing all day, so, he wrote a book. Then he worked on promoting the book and keeping up with his new audience via Facebook. soon he was waking up and falling to sleep with Facebook! He began setting himself up in the backyard from spring to autumn with a laptop, kindle, and IPad running simultaneously while he checked his email, blog, web site, social sites accounts and completed the NY Times crossword puzzle, read Saul Bellow and Dickens and followed the San Francisco Giants on TV on the IPad. Each and every step was evaluated and recorded on Facebook. As his pain increased he sought more and more to distract himself by seeking others so interested. If this online activity would divert him from the pain that grew more obvious each day, why would anyone object if he also grew less socially adept in person? ( Who doesn’t want to hide when sick and in pain?) I’ve had my doubts and kept them pretty much to myself, until tonight. When he complained that he didn’t want to engage in a conversation, that he simply wanted to retell our friend’s story, I realized that he wanted to substitute the essence of a Facebook relationship with that of our marriage of 40 years! He had become addicted to a format for communication that eliminated the need for face-to-face conversation and replaced it with witty, incisive retorts that were well edited and considered,

  • Kenneth Clark

    This is definitely not me, but I may know some folks on my facebook, twitter, yahoo and google+ accounts like this.

    • Saikat Basu

      I used to keep Facebook and Twitter open in a twin monitor. Stopped it recently as it was really hampering my concentration. Instead of that, now, after 25 minutes of continuous work, I have taken to mindfulness. Where I shut my eyes, and try to visualize and concentrate on the present moment. Helps to build up focus.

  • Félix S. De Jesús

    If you check the psychology of Facebook in Puerto Rico, most of the Fights and issues are thanks to Facebook. hahahahaha

  • Anonymous

    I guess as a very limited FB user I’m spared a lot of agony and despair!

  • Shmuel Mendelsohn

    To explain my previous comment – why is this different than any other compulsion?

Load 10 more
Affiliate Disclamer

This review may contain affiliate links, which pays us a small compensation if you do decide to make a purchase based on our recommendation. Our judgement is in no way biased, and our recommendations are always based on the merits of the items.

For more details, please read our disclosure.
Affiliate Disclamer

This review may contain affiliate links, which pays us a small compensation if you do decide to make a purchase based on our recommendation. Our judgement is in no way biased, and our recommendations are always based on the merits of the items.

For more details, please read our disclosure.