Heads Up, Hackers: 1Password Will Pay $100,000 If You Can Do This
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Hopefully, you use a password manager to secure the keys to your digital life. They’re much more convenient than trying to remember strong passwords, and more secure than using your browser’s insecure password-saving feature. However, a password manager isn’t any good if hackers can break into it, which means that the companies behind these tools are always trying to make their products better.

That’s why AgileBits, the company who makes 1Password, is offering $100,000 to anyone who can break into its systems and recover an unencrypted bit of “bad poetry.”

You can check out the security bounty on BugCrowd, a service which allows companies to reward people for finding vulnerabilities in their software. The $100,000 prize is currently the largest on the service, but 1Password warns that it won’t be an easy task.

By learning about vulnerabilities from skilled honest hackers instead of at the hands of the malicious, 1Password keeps your passwords even safer. Average users will probably never have accounts under the attack that this bounty requires, but it’s always better to over-test than under-test.

If you think you’re up to the task, check out 1Password’s BugCrowd page for instructions. Winning some cash and helping millions of people keep their passwords protected is a great combination. The huge payout shows that the company is serious about your security, which is important if you’re storing all your passwords with them!

Don’t forget that even a secure password manager can become compromised if you make basic security mistakes on your end.

Are you interested in trying to break into software for a bounty like this? Tell us if you use 1Password or another manager in the comments!

Image Credit: vectorfusionart via Shutterstock

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  1. Sean R Kethcart
    March 30, 2017 at 10:42 am

    Seems like an opportunistic PR/attention grab in the wake of the LastPass debacles wherein they were found with 2 major security flaws recently exposing user password vaults. In which case, good on them for being proactive about it.