Google Unveils Google Play Music All Access For Unlimited Music Streaming [Updates]

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As part of the first day of its Goole I/O tech developer conference this week, Google launched a subscription-based streaming music service called Google Play Music All Access. During the annual event, held in San Francisco, Google’s engineering director for Android, Chris Yerga, announced the new service, which is set to compete against existing music-streaming sites such as Spotify and Rdio.

Even Google’s major competitor, Apple, which still doesn’t have a streaming music service, may see its iTunes market share challenged by All Access. All Access is part of the Google Play platform which allows users to browse and purchase music, magazines, books, movies, television programs, and applications published through Google.

All Access costs $9.99 per month, with a 30-day free trial, but customers signing up before June 30th will pay a reduced monthly fee of $7.99. All Access provides unlimited access to Google’s entire online streaming music library, which is based on licensing agreements with music companies such as Universal Music and Sony Music Entertainment.

The subscription service can be used through the Google Play Web client and on Android devices. Subscribers can also add songs from the library to their devices for offline access. In addition, the monthly subscription includes a custom radio feature based on the songs, artists, and albums you select. All songs can be managed in playlists, purchased for download, and shared on Google+.

Included in the service for both subscribers and non-subscribers, is free access to the Google Play music storage locker which lets you upload up to 20,000 of your own songs and albums from your computer using the cross-platform Google Play Music Manager. The manager scans your iTunes library and any music folder on your computer and matches it with the same songs from the Google Play library. Copies of your songs not found in the Google library will be uploaded to your account.

All Access is currently US only, but if successful, might expand to other parts of the world in the future.

So what do you think of Google new music streaming service? Will you try it out or switch from your existing online music subscription?

Source: MercuryNews.com

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Comments (19)
  • Matjaz M

    I think that they don’t deserve using “All Access” in name since it can be accessed only in US.

  • Alex

    Hmm, interesting. I think I’m going to stick to Torch Music since it’s free!

  • David Moreira

    I’ll keep my Spotify subscription, thanks!

    • Bakari Chavanu

      David, I’ll probably stay with Rdio, but I really like the Radio feature, and the current $2 savings for a Google Play subscription. I also won’t switch because GP doesn’t play on iPhone yet.

  • macwitty

    Not sure about coming to other countries. Their music service (upload your own music and buy) have been around for long time and I always got “not available in your country” when not logged in behind proxy

    • Bakari Chavanu

      Macwitty, can you access other services like Spotify or Rdio?

    • macwitty

      Yes we got them both in Sweden. We got Spotify first as it was started here. Have to pay a bit more for Rdio than for people in US or Canada. For most of the others we have to make “tricks”. Like signing up with a fake US address to get the US iTunes store or go behind proxy to get Google music

  • Scott M

    Itunes began the process of change in how we procure music.Unfortunately we still aren’t able to own them.We only really lease them.Apple remains content with this system as do other providers.The one good aspect of Google among their many faults,is that they are attempting to deal with the change in buying habits in music and video media and are recognising also the changes occurring with current copyright legislation and its failure to evolve with the changes brought about through the internet.I hope they and others continue to suggest and adopt new copyright laws that will reflect the new paradigm and ensure that artists and those with patented material labels will be able to receive payment and that it will not threaten innovation.We now live in a landscape with continually evolving legislation and changes in how products are vended and owned..The constant battles from larger organizations suing new alternatives in order to have remain as things always were is a losing Luddite game.We didn’t protect wagon makers or buggy whip manufacturers when there products became outmoded.

    • Bakari Chavanu

      Excellent point, Scott. Of course, I just say nationalize all the streaming music and bring these turf wars to an end. Put all music in the cloud for everyone to access.

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Affiliate Disclamer

This review may contain affiliate links, which pays us a small compensation if you do decide to make a purchase based on our recommendation. Our judgement is in no way biased, and our recommendations are always based on the merits of the items.

For more details, please read our disclosure.