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Despite having a reasonable pair of Sennheisers and looking after them, my headphones broke recently — like they always do This Is Why Your Headphones Keep Breaking This Is Why Your Headphones Keep Breaking I can’t be the only one frustrated by the constant breaking of my headphones, earbuds, and pretty much anything else that has wiring, right? There are few feelings in the world that are worse than... Read More .

I need music to work. It can really help your productivity Find the Best Music to Boost Your Productivity Online Find the Best Music to Boost Your Productivity Online Listening to music helps you focus and get more done, according to music therapists. What kind of music will improve your mood, and make you more productive? And where should you start looking for music? Read More . I’ve even gone so far as to build my own Streaming Smart Speaker with a Raspberry Pi Turn An Old Amp Into A Smart Streaming Speaker With Raspberry Pi Turn An Old Amp Into A Smart Streaming Speaker With Raspberry Pi The ultimate self-contained music streaming speaker, with support for Spotify, Google Music, SoundCloud and Airplay. Let's do it. Read More . Unfortunately, for some reason, it’s seen as socially unacceptable to play music late at night — the hours when I’m most productive Who We Are: An Inside Look at Our Writers and Their Workstations Who We Are: An Inside Look at Our Writers and Their Workstations We all have a wide variety of computer setups and each of us has a unique workflow that keeps us productive. Join us as we bare our most sacred spaces for you to see! Read More — so I’ve been using my now-broken headphones.

Rather than replace them, I decided to repair my headphones. Most of the time the cable breaks rather than any of the important internals. I knew that replacing the headphones’ cable would give me a good chance of getting my cans working again.

You’ll need basic electronics skills Beginner's Electronics: 10 Skills You Need to Know Beginner's Electronics: 10 Skills You Need to Know Many of us have never even touched a soldering iron - but making things can incredibly rewarding. Here's ten of the most basic DIY electronics skills to help you get started. Read More but otherwise it’s a really simple project.

Step 1: You Will Need

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For this project, you obviously need a broken pair of headphones. We’re going to replace the cable which is the most common cause of failure, but if the issue is with the headphone drivers themselves this solution probably won’t fix it. You won’t know until you try though, so open them up and see what the problem is.

You’ll also need:

Step 2: Disassemble the Headphones

First you need to take your headphones apart. For every set of headphones the process will be slightly different. For my Sennheisers, the ear cups could be removed just by pulling on them. This exposed four screws which, when removed, allowed me to access the headphones’ internals.

Use your common sense, very little force and the tools you have on hand to carefully disassemble your headphones.

Step 3: Removing the Old Wire

Most headphones fail at the wire so we’re going to totally replace it. It’s always a good idea to keep track of how things were before you got “handy” so use your phone to take a picture of how the inside of the headphones looks.

Using your clippers, snip the wire where it is soldered into the headphones. You can throw it in the bin.

With your soldering iron, heat the old solder on the headphones’ contacts until it bubbles, then use the solder remover to get rid of it. Do this for all four contacts.

Step 4: Prepping the New Wire

The new wire I ordered was designed to connect to a high-end pair of headphones. Clip the jacks off the end that plugs into the headphones. Strip the outer casing to reveal the internal wires.

In most headphone cables there are two sets of wires: one is coloured either red or green, the other is copper. Separate the two sets of strands from each other and twist them together. There may also be some white insulating strands. You can trim them away.

The colouring on the wire is insulation. Use the sandpaper to remove it from the ends so there will be a good connection when you solder it in.

Step 5: Attaching the New Wire

Insert the replacement cable into the headphones.

Referring back to the image you took of the headphone internals (you did take a photo, right?) — match the green and red cables up to the correct contacts. Apply solder to the contact and then connect the coloured wire. Solder the corresponding copper wire to the other contact.

Connect the other end of the cable to your smartphone or computer and check that the headphones are working. If not, check your solder connections.

Step 6: Finishing Touches

With the headphones working, the only thing left to do is seal everything back up. Solder has very limited mechanical strength so use Sugru to attach the new wire securely to the headphones. I also used Sugru to replace the rubber join where the wire meets the headphone body. For more on working with Sugru, check out Kannon’s article on using it to make a smartphone case Four Easy Sugru Recipes To Make Your Own Awesome Smartphone Case Four Easy Sugru Recipes To Make Your Own Awesome Smartphone Case Do you own an expensive phone, gadget or camera and can’t find a case? That’s a common problem nowadays with the huge variety of gizmos on the market. Fortunately, you can craft your own protective... Read More .

Re-assemble your headphones, test they still work and you’re done.

Headphones are a deceptively simple piece of technology and generally break in the same way. For $30 and 20 minutes of soldering you can easily repair them yourself. If you’ve invested in a nice set of cans, this can extend their lifetime by years.

  1. GReg
    April 24, 2015 at 12:04 am

    Great useful article! Thanks!

  2. cg
    March 15, 2015 at 8:20 pm

    my sony mdr v6 has 9 lives. i repaired it many times.

  3. Melville
    March 15, 2015 at 7:16 pm

    More amazing is the sugru

  4. Henry Lahore
    March 15, 2015 at 12:37 pm

    Cables typically break just as they enter the device.
    They need strain relief.
    I have been extending my headphone life about 10X by spreading out the strain out over about 1 inch. I use self fusing electrical tape. Works great for over a decade for cables to headphones, laptops, iPads, Wacom tablets, etc.. When I buy the device I immediately put the strain relief tape on.

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