Easy GUI Management of Grub and Usplash Settings with Startup Manager [Linux]

startupmanagerlogo   Easy GUI Management of Grub and Usplash Settings with Startup Manager [Linux]Ever wanted to change the Grub bootloader entries? Wanted to hide some, move some to top and make defaults? People must have suggested to edit /boot/grub/menu.lst. Oh and don’t forget to back it up if you make a mess of it. There are all these different options you can add to the defoptions line to make it look the way you want. Sounds like too much to handle? How about a GUI tool to make all this a breeze and still have lots more to offer?

StartUp Manager can be used to achieve this easily. You can install StartUp Manager by using your distribution’s package manager. Or check here. Once installed, it can be found under

System > Administration > StartUp Manager.

StartUp Manager can be used to easily customize a number of options that would otherwise require you to get your hands dirty by editing configuration files. As a start, you can change boot options such as the selection timeout and default operating system. If you have multiple operating systems, a useful option here is to make the Last Used operating system as the default choice, which would automatically boot the one you used the last time. Such a setting can be quite handy when you have a clear favorite in terms of operating systems and others are just installed for completeness.

bootoptions   Easy GUI Management of Grub and Usplash Settings with Startup Manager [Linux]

You can also change the display resolution and the color depth if you are experiencing any problems with the display of the main menu. Uncheck “Show bootloader menu” if you don’t want to see the menu, and boot the default operating system each time. “Show bootsplash” can be used to add an image as background to the bootloader menu. We did a complete tutorial on it some time back. “Show text during boot” provides you with textual feedback of what is currently happening in the boot process.

appearance   Easy GUI Management of Grub and Usplash Settings with Startup Manager [Linux]

The appearance tab allows you to customize the look of the bootloader menu as well as the Usplash theme. You can add colors to the bootloader menu, pick and choose the ones you like. A Usplash theme governs the progress bar display during the boot process. You can find some Usplash themes here, click on “Manage Usplash themes” and add the one you downloaded, then select the one you like and next time you boot, it would be there to greet you.

usplash   Easy GUI Management of Grub and Usplash Settings with Startup Manager [Linux]

That is not all by any stretch of imagination. StartUp Manager allows you to do pretty advanced stuff. You can password-protect the bootloader or only recovery mode entries (a good choice) or the boot options by simply placing a check against the option and specifying the password.

passwordprot   Easy GUI Management of Grub and Usplash Settings with Startup Manager [Linux]

If you are bothered by how cluttered the bootloader gets after a kernel upgrade, you can limit the number of entries from here in. Uncheck “Create boot option for recovery mode” to remove the recovery mode altogether if you are paranoid about someone getting into your system through recovery mode root prompt.

advanced   Easy GUI Management of Grub and Usplash Settings with Startup Manager [Linux]

StartUp Manager is a no fuss tool which greatly simplifies tweaking and customizing of bootloader options and helps you manage Grub and Usplash settings easily without having to go in and tinker with the configuration files yourself. What do you think of it? Let us know in the comments.

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3 Comments -

0 votes

Mihir Patel

Hello,

It’s very nice tutorial. Nice tools for Grub and splash screen. But I think most of the linux users loves to change all the things from CLI.

Anyways nice tool. I like it. I am gonna try this for sure.

Regards,
Mihir
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