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There’s a new prank floating around the Internet and there’s no word as to when — or if — it will be fixed. For those who aren’t aware, the prank involves tricking people into visiting the crashsafari.com website. Don’t do it, but if you do, make sure you visit using a computer.

In short, the website employs a bit of JavaScript code 3 Ways JavaScript Can Breach Your Privacy & Security 3 Ways JavaScript Can Breach Your Privacy & Security JavaScript is a good thing for the most part, but it just happens to be so flexible and so powerful that keeping it in check can be difficult. Here's what you need to know. Read More to recall the HTML5 history in an infinite loop, which eventually causes the browser to run out of memory. What happens next depends on your device.

link-prank-crash-phones-iphone

On iPhones and iPads, visiting the site forces your phone to reboot after about 20 seconds. On Android devices, the site slows your device to a crawl and causes it to overheat until you close whichever browser you used to visit it.

On computers using Safari, the site causes the browser to crash. With any other browser, the site slows the machine to a crawl until the tab is closed or the browser is exited.

The good news is that this prank causes no damage.

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Here’s the prank aspect: People have been linking to the site using URL shorteners that disguise the actual address. If you encounter a shortened URL, you might be able to check its validity using one of these URL expander services Reveal Where Short Links Really Go To With These URL Expanders Reveal Where Short Links Really Go To With These URL Expanders A few years ago, I didn’t even know what a shortened URL was. Today, it’s all you see, everywhere, all the time. The rapid rise of Twitter brought a never-ending need to use as few... Read More .

Unfortunately, expanders aren’t very convenient when you’re on a smartphone, plus they aren’t always effective. So for now, and until further notice, your best bet is to avoid all shortened URLs except when you absolutely trust the source linking it to you.

Have you fallen for this one yet? What are the worst social “pranks” you’ve ever seen on the Internet? Tell us about them in the comments below!

Image Credits: White iPhone by file404 via Shutterstock, Black iPhone by guteksk7 via Shutterstock

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