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You have invested yourself into Chrome and might even call yourself a power user How To Become A Chrome Power User, Part 1 - Master The Keyboard How To Become A Chrome Power User, Part 1 - Master The Keyboard Google Chrome for some time has been the browser of choice for many and although the majority of our web browsers can do some pretty impressive things, Chrome has continued to snatch up power users,... Read More . But Chrome is at an excruciating level of slowness, completely disrupting your workflow and pushing you far past the point of just frustration.

There are a lot of things you can do to speed Chrome up What Can You Do To Speed Up Your Browser? What Can You Do To Speed Up Your Browser? If you’re like me and you spend a huge portion of your day browsing the web then you understand how frustrating it is to have a slow, bloated browser that seems to be on its... Read More … and you’ve tried all of them, with no avail. Now you’re contemplating ditching Chrome and switching to Internet Explorer or Firefox. I can relate. In fact, this was my exact situation. Some solutions did help improve Chrome a little, but there was only one thing that fixed the problem.

Aside from general sluggishness, which can be attributed to a lot of things, the primary issue I was having was an agonizingly slow and laggy address bar, also known as the Omnibox 11 Quick Tricks To Become A Chrome Omnibox Power User 11 Quick Tricks To Become A Chrome Omnibox Power User Do you want to become an Omnibox power user and save plenty of time and keystrokes? All you need are a few good extensions and a little knowledge of how to tweak the search settings.... Read More . It was so bad that I could type out the entire search or URL and then sit back and wait for what seemed like an eternity for the text to appear. Several threads in the Google Product Forums discussed this exact issue, but many of the recommended “fixes” didn’t solve this problem for the majority of users.

Some of these included clearing browser data (cache, history, cookies, etc.), removing or disabling extensions, disabling plugins, closing and reopening Chrome, turning off hardware acceleration, restarting the PC, reinstalling Chrome.

Before You Start

0.1 Chrome settings

Be sure to take a backup of your settings before you attempt any of the following instructions. For instance, you could sync your Chrome settings, upload your bookmarks to Xmarks, and use a tool like LastPass for your passwords.

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0.2 Chrome browser settings - connect to google account

It’s crucial you backup your Chrome profile, otherwise all personalized settings will be lost. You can do this by going to the top “three-line” Chrome Customizations button and clicking “Settings”.

0.3 - Chrome browser settings - advanced sync settings

At the top of the Settings page will be the option to sync your Chrome browser with your Google account. Sign in, then click the “Advanced sync settings” button to toggle what you do and don’t want to sync.

If you were hoping to do this manually, I’m sorry, but those files which you’d be copying are what you’ll be deleting, thus you need to ensure all is backed up to your Google account.

The Fix

By the time I discovered this solution, I was so worn out and frustrated that I would have tried anything (not a good state of mind to be in when troubleshooting), but thankfully this worked out and the results were instant.

With Chrome closed, open up your file browser (e.g. Windows Explorer) and input the following:

Windows:

%localappdata%\Google\Chrome\User Data\Default

Mac:

~/Library/Application Support/Google/Chrome/Default/

1 History Provider Cache Chrome folder

Deleting any other history, temporary or cache files doesn’t work, but manually deleting what is called the History Provider Cache file does. Once you’ve opened this folder, select all and tap the Delete key. Reopen Chrome and you should see the problem immediately rectified.

More Tips for Boosting Chrome’s Performance

If you’re battling general sluggishness, there are a few other recommended tips for increasing the speed and performance of Chrome.

Compatibility Mode

Right-click on the Chrome icon on your Desktop, click Properties and go to the Compatibility tab. Check “Run this program in compatibility mode for” and select your operating system from the dropdown menu.

2 Compatibility Mode - Chrome

Alternatively, if this is already checked and you’ve tried other options, you can try unchecking it – sometimes troubleshooting renders interesting results.

Disable Unnecessary Settings

This is optional, but if you want to reduce Chrome’s resource usage and increase its performance, you can disable/uncheck the following settings by typing in chrome://settings in the address bar.

Under “Search”:

3.1 search settings

  • Enable “Ok Google” to start a voice search

Under “Show advanced settings” > “Privacy”:

3.2 privacy settings

  • Use a web service to help resolve navigation errors
  • Use a prediction service to help complete searches and URLs typed in the address bar or the app launcher search box
  • Automatically report details of possible security incidents to Google
  • Use a web service to help resolve spelling errors
  • Automatically send usage statistics and crash reports to Google
  • Send a “Do Not Track” request with your browsing traffic

Under “System”:

3.3 system settings

There have been many cases reported where turning off hardware acceleration has helped solved problems such as a lagging mouse cursor or Omnibox. This is also under “Show advanced settings”.

  • Use hardware acceleration when available

Manage Your Extensions Better

4.1 extensions

We all know extensions can weigh down on the overall performance of a browser. Some extensions are more demanding of system resources than others. Go through your installed extensions and apps (chrome://extensions), and see if you have any installed that you really aren’t using or don’t need for your workflow 3 Smart Chrome Extensions to Speed Up Your Workflow 3 Smart Chrome Extensions to Speed Up Your Workflow Chrome's minimalist and user-friendly interface is a big reason for its popularity, along with the excellent extensions available in the Web store. Here are three that will make browsing easier for you. Read More .

What about managing extensions 3 Chrome Extensions To Manage Your Chrome Extensions 3 Chrome Extensions To Manage Your Chrome Extensions Google Chrome has many extensions that work for you. But just like any collection of workers, when the force gets large enough, you need to get managers to make sure everything is running smoothly. Read More you do need? You may only occasionally use an extension, but disabling and enabling it can be a hassle. An extension called SimpleExtManager allows you to toggle apps and extensions on and off with a single click.

4.2 simpleextmanager

Disable Unnecessary Plugins

You can’t completely uninstall Chrome plugins (chrome://plugins), which is a good thing. You can disable any plugins you deem unnecessary. If you do happen to disable a plugin that you find you do need, such as Adobe Flash Player, just go back and enable it.

5.1 chrome plugins

How do you know if you need a plugin or not? Click the “Details” box to expand plugin information and read the description. Don’t hesitate to “Google” a plugin you’re unsure about too.

5.2 plugin details

Reach Under The Hood

What’s referred to as “Chrome Experiments” can be accessed by typing chrome://flags in the address bar. We’ve previously elaborated on customizing these special settings Using Google Chrome? Here's How to Reach Under The Hood & Customize Special Settings Using Google Chrome? Here's How to Reach Under The Hood & Customize Special Settings Chrome is one of my favorite Google products. Google got a few core, basic principles right in its design, and instead of becoming bloated over time like most software, Chrome remained svelte, secure, and very,... Read More .

6 chrome - flags

Clearing Your Browser History

Clearing your browser history can be good and bad. Note that these local files help keep Chrome running quickly so that it doesn’t have to constantly recreate them. However, after a while they can build up and cause adverse effects. So if you are regularly deleting them or have Chrome set to automatically delete these files on closing, stop and disable that.

7 browser history

But if you have never deleted these files and Chrome is still slow after trying other solutions, then go ahead and clear all of these files. Just do this sparingly in the future.

Run the Software Removal tool

8.1 software removal webpage

Recently Google released a software removal tool (which is still in beta) to scan and remove software that may be causing problems such as crashing Chrome, unusual startup pages and toolbars and unexpected ads you can’t get rid of.

8.2 chrome software removal tool

This tool is currently Windows-only and requires admin privileges. More information on this tool here.

A Completely Different Browsing Experience

For me, what almost caused me to give up on Chrome was its speed. I just couldn’t understand how even after a complete uninstall and cleaning out all associated files 4 Steps To Completely Remove Troublesome Or Bad Software [Windows] 4 Steps To Completely Remove Troublesome Or Bad Software [Windows] We’ve all had that one program that no matter what we’ve tried, it wouldn’t go away. Or perhaps you didn’t even know what to try and thought you were simply stuck with this annoying program... Read More , it was still slow. But clearly the folder referenced to in the beginning was never cleared or removed, and the new install of Chrome was still accessing it.

Once I found the solution was deleting all its contents, my Chrome user experience instantly turned around.

Have you had an issue with Chrome that almost made you scrap it altogether? What was it and how did you resolve it? Share your experience in the comments.

UPDATE: I made a mistake when writing this article. Because I already had my Chrome browser synced to my Google account, it didn’t even occur to me to mention that syncing your browser to your account was a step. I’m truly sorry for any headaches this caused when you followed the instructions and realized you deleted all your Chrome preferences. That is huge, I know. Thank you, everyone, for the feedback in the comment section that brought this issue to light.

  1. Anonymous
    November 13, 2016 at 12:25 am

    You forgot to add the location in linux: ~/.config/google-chrome/Default

  2. Tom Motley
    October 10, 2016 at 6:31 am

    You write: "Deleting any other history, temporary or cache files doesn’t work, but manually deleting what is called the History Provider Cache file does. Once you’ve opened this folder, select all and tap the Delete key. Reopen Chrome and you should see the problem immediately rectified."

    The History Provider Cache file is not a folder, so your reference to "this folder" is unclear. If you're talking about the entire Chrome\User Data\Default folder that you show earlier (in which the History Provider Cache file can be found, although you don't show it), why do you even specify the History Provider Cache file? Your instruction to "select all" clearly means we're supposed to delete more than one file, but you refer to "manually deleting" a single file (the History Provider Cache) before you write, "Once you’ve opened this folder, select all and tap the Delete key." Do you not see how frustratingly unclear this is? I don't want to delete the entire Default folder if that's not what I'm supposed to do.

  3. Tom Motley
    October 10, 2016 at 6:12 am

    test

  4. Ming Keat Chin
    August 15, 2016 at 8:01 am

    Make sure you didn't enable Extension debugging by accident, it was the root cause of chrome performance issues for me until i disable that.

  5. walter
    August 14, 2016 at 12:50 pm

    use chrome canary

  6. Kelly
    July 4, 2016 at 5:14 pm

    Thanks, this was very helpful!

  7. Jaden Peterson
    June 18, 2016 at 3:09 am

    What about Linux?

  8. Hermansson
    May 29, 2016 at 9:22 pm

    Deleting all the folders and files in the folder you linked to solved the ever-lagging Chrome that I have lost numerous nights of sleep over recently. Thank you so much, OP.

  9. Robin
    February 16, 2016 at 7:06 am

    Hi Aaron,

    As it happens I like chrome and use it a lot. If it went faster that will help a lot, so I will read you essay in great detail later.

    I'm now thinking of ditching Chrome because the history seems to have changed, I now only get a very short list which usually doesn't include the item I need.

    I've tried an app called ChromeHistoryView which does seem to show everything, but it's too hard to use except in desparation.

    It's made worse by my laptop battery having died and then all the open pages sometimes disappear even though it asked if I wanted them all restored.

    I don't know when it changed or what caused it.

    I'm on 48.0.2564.109 so perhaps an automatic update caused it.

    Can you help me at all?

    Thanks in hope, Robin

  10. Namma
    May 24, 2015 at 6:29 pm

    Didn't read every single comment above in depth, scanned and didn't see what I am looking for.

    There needs to be a method to save LOCALLY to a backup drive without utilizing backup software (when did people get so stupid?).

    In other words, tell folks HOW to identify the Chrome profile folders with ALL of their data and HOW to back THAT up so that they can manually accomplish that WITHOUT having all and sundry know their data.

    This "cloud computing" in the most ill advised move in a world where we are (now) trying to get our privacy back. Once uploaded/synced/whatever you call it you use control of your privacy and are at risk no matter what anyone claims.

    • Aaron Couch
      May 25, 2015 at 1:46 pm

      Hi Namma, I understand your concern. I really do. I hope you believe me when I say this isn't part of the "cloud computing agenda". I believe in local backups just as much and if not more than the cloud. However, this scenario is gravely different. To my knowledge, there is no way to identify where the corruption is occurring. It could be any file in any folder. By backing up those files locally, there is a risk of saving the corrupted file and having the same issue afterwards.

  11. pmshah
    May 15, 2015 at 1:35 am

    What I would like to know is of a way to minimise the NAMELESS web.whatsapp.com window that opens an instance of chrome. In fact lately it has gotten so frustrating that I am seriously considering totally getting rid of chrome from my desktop.

  12. Waqas Wasil
    May 14, 2015 at 5:26 pm

    Well, I have Chromium installed on my old desktop computer running Lubuntu 15.04. The problem is that whenever I click chrome icon, it takes 20-25 seconds to start and then works normally. A Suggestion will be appreciated.

    P.S: Sorry for my bad english.

    • Aaron Couch
      May 21, 2015 at 1:34 am

      I am not familiar with the Chromium OS specifically, but I'll reach out to some of our staff writers who are and see if they can help! In the meantime, you may want to look to MakeUseOf Answers for help and post your question there. Staff writers and the fellow MUO community love to help!

    • Brock
      May 21, 2015 at 5:41 pm

      I have a pretty nice and fairly new computer with Xubuntu 14.04, and Chrome and Chromium were both taking 20 to 25 seconds to load the first time, just as you mention. After loading the first time after boot, it did not take long for a new window to open. I then installed an SSD instead of and HDD. Now Chromium/Chrome takes about 1-2 seconds to load the first time. On an HDD it just seems to take a while to load that data from the HDD to the RAM. Chrome/Chromium of course is known for its high RAM usage. Right now I only have this page open and Chromium is using about 550 MB of RAM. I suppose all of this data just takes a bit to load to RAM on the initial startup for Chromium.

  13. Brock
    May 13, 2015 at 9:04 pm

    I appreciate the article, but it should be revised. The language quoted below is ambiguous. It should be clarified whether we only would delete the 'History Provider Cache' file or if we would need to delete all items in the 'Default' directory mentioned above. Thank you.

    (Even if you delete the entire contents of the 'Default' directory, just sign back into Chrome and all extensions and bookmarks will automatically repopulate.)

    "Deleting any other history, temporary or cache files doesn’t work, but manually deleting what is called the History Provider Cache file does. Once you’ve opened this folder, select all and tap the Delete key. Reopen Chrome and you should see the problem immediately rectified."

    • wraith808
      May 15, 2015 at 12:48 am

      Some people don't sign into Chrome.

    • jena
      May 18, 2015 at 8:18 pm

      well those are doomed then.. if they didn't backup..

    • Aaron Couch
      May 21, 2015 at 1:32 am

      Brock,

      That folder I mentioned in the article is the History Provider File. To refer back to the original text: "manually deleting what is called the History Provider Cache file does. Once you’ve opened this folder, select all and tap the Delete key. Reopen Chrome and you should see the problem immediately rectified."

      Chrome refers to this folder as the History Provider Cache file. To us, it's an entire folder.

      I've updated the article with a section about syncing Chrome to your Google Account. Yes, you delete all of those files. That's what you're syncing, except for the corrupted files that are making Chrome slow.

      The solution worked perfectly for me. I simply made the mistake of not considering that others should connect their Chrome to their Google account, since mine was already connected (this I also said in the update at the end of the article.)

      Also, this was mentioned in the article, but I'd like to reiterate that this fix is for the specific problem of a painfully slow address bar. If you have other slow issues, try the other methods mentioned later in the article first

  14. Garrett
    May 13, 2015 at 8:08 pm

    Highly recommend SimpleExtManager
    For being able to turn off and on groups of extensions, within the options page you can make groups (I create site-specific or situation specific groups because I use a lot of them [customization junkie]...so, I have groups for youtube, drive, google, facebook, or things that are useful in fullscreen or when researching...activate the groups when you use the sites, deactivate other times, here's what that looks like http://prntscr.com/74vc3g) and then you can make it so you can activate or deactivate within the context menu. You can make it so you have more control over the groups by going into the "advanced groups view". This allows you to see all the extensions in the groups within the popups. Combine the two and you have the options to disable the whole group within the context menu or go into the group and pick what you need in the popup

  15. Charrid
    May 13, 2015 at 6:35 pm

    I have given up on Chrome. I have had problems with the browser ever since they released a Chrome 64 bit version. I have tried to just have either the 32 bit or 64 bit version on the computer, I have tried all the tips such as on Make Use Of. As nothing works I am using IE 11, which is working surprisingly fast at the moment.

  16. darrin
    May 13, 2015 at 10:15 am

    i sticking to firefox for now. seems to be the fastest browser out there so far.

  17. dan
    May 13, 2015 at 3:45 am

    The History provider folder doesnt exist as far as I can tell........

    • Aaron Couch
      May 21, 2015 at 1:29 am

      Dan, the folder I told you to go to is the "file" that Chrome accesses. Don't get the two confused.

      Remember to sync Chrome to your Google account before deleting all of those files.

  18. Mary Brady
    May 12, 2015 at 10:50 pm

    I put less stress on Chrome hogging resources by using free "Sidewise Tree Style Tabs" Chrome extension. It allows one to hibernate unused tabs. I just checked Chrome extensions and it is an active extension.

    • Aaron Couch
      May 21, 2015 at 1:28 am

      Thanks for the tip, Mary! Though this article isn't about Chrome being slow or hogging resources. It's about a specific issue with the address bar being painfully sluggish. Though, I did offer additional tips to help with the overall speed of Chrome too.

    • Mary Brady
      May 22, 2015 at 10:21 am

      Hi Aaron! You are welcome. Perhaps I didn't completely express my intention above. I did understand that the article was about overall speed of Chrome. If the tabs that were in use on the current session were hibernated, wouldn't the speed of Chrome response be quicker than if the tabs were not hibernated? That was the point I was trying to make.

  19. Anonymous
    May 12, 2015 at 10:49 pm

    Ya I use Linix Mint and was curious about the same

  20. Boter2099
    May 12, 2015 at 4:07 pm

    "or have Chrome set to automatically delete these files on closing"

    Wait - can this be done without an extension? I had to add the extension "Click&Clean" and have it delete on close because I could not find this setting (which exists in EVERY OTHER BROWSER) anywhere in chrome.

    • Aaron Couch
      May 21, 2015 at 1:26 am

      What context are you quoting me? Your question and the point I was making with that line is somewhat disconnected.

      But to answer your question, yes it can. Though in the article I am saying that it's NOT RECOMMENDED as clearing those files on a regular basis actually has the adverse effect of SLOWING Chrome down.

  21. Davis
    May 12, 2015 at 3:36 pm

    why would you bother to jump through all these hoops just to have Google follow you and accumulate everything you do & save it to their database? Use firefox for browser. Use DuckDuckGo for your search engine.

    • Tinkicker
      May 12, 2015 at 3:51 pm

      Duckduckgo is actually very much improved over older versions, and uses results from Google

  22. Mary Jane
    May 12, 2015 at 3:10 pm

    I found no History Provider Cache File

    • Aaron Couch
      May 21, 2015 at 1:23 am

      Mary Jane,

      That folder is what the "file" is. That's why I said, "what is called the 'History Provider Cache file'". You delete all of those files in that folder.

      IMPORTANT: I've updated the article with a section about syncing Chrome to your Google Account. That's what you're syncing, except for the corrupted files that are making Chrome slow.

      Also, this was mentioned in the article, but I'd like to reiterate that this fix is for the specific problem of a painfully slow address bar. If you have other slow issues, try the other methods mentioned later in the article first.

  23. Haya
    May 12, 2015 at 5:03 am

    @NeverMind

    I followed the steps and deleted the whole folder. It kind of puts Chrome back to it original untouched installation stage.

    You can sign back into your google account and all your extensions and saved bookmarks will come back. I just done it.

    I'll comment in a few days on whether there is a significant speed change or not.

  24. NeverMind
    May 12, 2015 at 12:28 am

    Deleting local datadefault was the stupidest suggestion ever. All my extensions and everything associated with them are GONE. Shame on me I listened to a harebrained idea from someone I never knew. Never again.

    • ryan
      May 12, 2015 at 4:58 am

      agreed

    • Wayne
      May 12, 2015 at 7:18 pm

      I agree. This was a stupid suggestion to follow. Thank goodness I was sync'ed with Google.

    • Chris
      May 12, 2015 at 7:55 pm

      That's not what he said. The tip was to look IN the data default folder for the history provider cache file and delete that.

    • wraith808
      May 15, 2015 at 12:18 am

      That *is* what he said. It might not be what he meant, but it *is* what he said.

      With Chrome closed, open up your file browser (e.g. Windows Explorer) and input the following:
      Windows:
      %localappdata%GoogleChromeUser DataDefault

      Deleting any other history, temporary or cache files doesn’t work, but manually deleting what is called the History Provider Cache file does. Once you’ve opened this folder, select all and tap the Delete key. Reopen Chrome and you should see the problem immediately rectified.

      And the picture even shows that. And there is no folder called history provider cache, because it's not a FOLDER it's a SQLLite file. One File. If he meant one file, he wouldn't have said select all and tap the delete key. Shoddy reporting.

    • Aaron Couch
      May 21, 2015 at 1:20 am

      I've updated the article with a section about syncing Chrome to your Google Account. Yes, you delete all of those files. That's what you're syncing, except for the corrupted files that are making Chrome slow.

      The solution worked perfectly for me. I simply made the mistake of not considering that others should connect their Chrome to their Google account, since mine was already connected (this I also said in the update at the end of the article.)

      Also, this was mentioned in the article, but I'd like to reiterate that this fix is for the specific problem of a painfully slow address bar. If you have other slow issues, try the other methods mentioned later in the article first.

  25. likefunbuntot
    May 11, 2015 at 7:23 pm

    One of my biggest issues with Chrome is the sheer number of places where malicious software can hide in a Chrome installation. I still see machines with infected addons "Installed by Enterprise Policy" that assert control over the entire browsing experience and are very difficult to remove even with full administrative control over a machine and after completely removing Chrome and its main profile data from a computer.

    I find Chrome to be extremely disrespectful of RAM resources, especially for browsing with multiple open tabs. This is an architectural matter that is not going to be resolved through any combination of changes to settings, but as a person who likes to browse with lots of open tabs, it is at best unsatisfying.

    Finally, Chrome is missing some of the user interface and privacy features I expect from Mozilla's ecosystem. Developers don't have hooks to change as many aspects of Chrome's behavior, which makes it a second or third place option in my opinion.

    At the moment, I do actually think that IE11 is a better option on Windows than Chrome while Firefox supersedes both. This idea would have been completely unthinkable even 18 months ago and I think it represents how poor Chrome has become rather than any amount of success on the part of IE.

  26. Doc
    May 11, 2015 at 4:39 pm

    I tried Chrome when it first started gaining users for being "wicked fast," but when I learned how crippled addons and extensions were, I went back to Firefox. Two addons for a digital clock in the toolbar - one for hours (separate apps for 12-hour and 24-hour mode!), and one for minutes! And all the addons leaked memory like crazy! (It's probably improved since then, but I've got so many beloved Firefox addons, I'm not jumping ship).
    Nope nope nope.

    • jena
      May 18, 2015 at 8:13 pm

      Well since there are no or very poor (e.g. overshot complicated) FF alternatives to my chrome extensions I'm probably sticking to chrome. I tried FF for a week when my chrome started to crash badly taking down even my system. After a week in FF I figured out there was a change in chrome and I had to turn off hw support - after that I ended the FF mess and went happily back to chrome :)

  27. Les Carter
    May 11, 2015 at 3:25 pm

    Your wording is ambiguous, "... the History Provider Cache file does. Once you’ve opened this folder, select all and tap the Delete key."
    Does one simply delete the History Provider Cache (file) or everything in the Default folder?

    • Alex
      May 12, 2015 at 11:35 am

      I Second that, it wasn't very clear.

      Also does revo-uninstaller remove that file? It's supposed to be able to catch and remove files that usual uninstallers miss... Though I've never actually used it, I keep meaning to try it

    • Aaron Couch
      May 21, 2015 at 1:18 am

      That folder IS the History Provider Cache file.

      I've updated the article with a section about syncing Chrome to your Google Account. Yes, you delete all of those files. That's what you're syncing, except for the corrupted files that are making Chrome slow.

      Also, this was mentioned in the article, but I'd like to reiterate that this fix is for the specific problem of a painfully slow address bar. If you have other slow issues, try the other methods mentioned later in the article first.

    • LesCarter
      May 21, 2015 at 1:49 am

      I still think the wording is ambiguous. Look at the later posts of those that deleted the entire contents of the Default folder. On my Windows 8.1 machine, History Provider Cache is a file, i.e. can't be opened by Win Explorer. I cannot open that FILE as I don't have a program that runs or edits it, so I cannot delete its contents. But I can delete the folder.
      Do you often use the terms file and folder interchangeably?

    • Aaron Couch
      May 21, 2015 at 1:53 am

      Les,

      No. File and folder is two different things. Chrome READS this folder as a file. The official name is "History Provider Cache". This, however, is a folder with many files (and folders) within it.

      I'm also using Windows 8.1 too.

    • LesCarter
      May 24, 2015 at 12:42 am

      I've long been aware that Chrome uses a file/ folder for items clearly in folders in IE. Even File Explorer, in the column 'type' refers to this as a file, and it behaves as one in that File Explorer won't open it. Wraith808 below addresses this succinctly, and says this is "shoddy reporting".
      It seems your machine has the ability to open this 'folder' (I assume, since that's in your instructions). Your failure to realize the misleading nature of your instructions means I'll be sure to skip your articles in the future.

  28. Manny
    May 11, 2015 at 2:40 pm

    There are a whole lot of files and folders in %localappdata%GoogleChromeUser DataDefault. Are you sure it's ok to delete them all? It won't affect anything?

  29. Manny
    May 11, 2015 at 2:40 pm

    There are a whole lot of files and folders in %localappdata%GoogleChromeUser DataDefault. Are you sure it's ok to delete them all? It won't affect anything?

    • ryan
      May 12, 2015 at 4:58 am

      I would not if you like Chrome to remember your names and password logins. I just spent the better half of an hour reentering all this info after deleting it like suggested.

    • wraith808
      May 14, 2015 at 11:35 pm

      If you delete everything in there, you're in for a world full of trouble and re-setting things up. Extensions, Passwords, Bookmarks, etc... pretty shameful job of explaining it, IMO.

    • dvous
      May 15, 2015 at 4:32 am

      If you delete everything as suggested, you return Chrome to the just-installed state - no saved passwords, no bookmmarks etc

      Yes, it makes Chrome much quicker, so do it if you have to.

      BUT FIRST MAKE SURE YOU BACK UP EVERYTHING!!!

    • Tom Westheimer
      May 16, 2015 at 12:04 am

      Deleting everything wipes all the installations etc - NOT GOOD

    • Aaron Couch
      May 21, 2015 at 1:14 am

      I've updated the article with a section about syncing Chrome to your Google Account. Yes, you delete all of those files. That's what you're syncing, except for the corrupted files that are making Chrome slow.

  30. M. Imaduddin Sawal
    May 11, 2015 at 1:22 pm

    I see someone doesn't consider Linux while giving tips ... hehe

    Anyways, what's the directory for Linux ?

    Looks great, though.

    • Brock
      May 13, 2015 at 8:47 pm

      /home/USERNAME/.config/chromium/Default
      or
      /home/USERNAME/.config/google-chrome/Default

      I don't even know if this is an issue on Linux. I do know though that I have a nice computer, and Chromium and Chrome were taking about 20 seconds to load the first time. Then I upgraded to an SSD. Now it is about 1-2 seconds. The above paths are on Xubuntu 14.04. I deleted all contents of the 'Default' directory. This basically makes Chrome/Chromium as if it were a new install. You will have to sign in again to get your bookmarks or re-import them from a backup. I backed up the 'Default' folder and my bookmarks ahead of time just to be sure. It seems that this directory has items that are not in the 'Default' directory for OS X and Windows.

    • Brock
      May 13, 2015 at 8:57 pm

      Both Chrome and Chromium have the 'History Provider Cache' file he mentions above.

    • jena
      May 18, 2015 at 8:02 pm

      Brock - I have a file named like that on my Ubuntu 14.04, not a folder though. But my chrome flies so I don't care (for now) :D

    • Aaron Couch
      May 21, 2015 at 1:13 am

      Thanks for pitching in, Brock!

      M. Imaduddin Sawal, I'm not against Linux, I just am not familiar with it or realize this problem would exist on it :-)

    • Imaduddin Sawal
      May 21, 2015 at 7:02 am

      I know Aaron ... that was a half-joke tbh.

      But really ... on the other point, Chrome really freezes Linux sometimes.

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