Do You Use Two-Step Verification? [MakeUseOf Poll]

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Last week we asked you how many monitors you use in your current setup. Thanks to the great turnout of voters, it was possible to get a pretty clear picture of the most popular setup. Can you guess what it is?

Out of 624 votes in total, 2% use five monitors or more in their setup (awesome!), 4% use four monitors, 19% use three monitors in their setup, another 19% use two monitors, one of which is a laptop, 20% use one single monitor, and the majority of the voters, 36%, use two monitors in their setup. Are you surprised?

Full results and this week’s poll after the jump.

Don’t forget to check out last week’s best comment by Ben Wilson, who took the time to tell us all about his setup, and won 150 reward points for his effort!

This week’s poll question is: Do You Use Two-Step Verification?

Want to make some extra MakeUseOf reward points? The most useful comment on the poll will be awarded 150 points!

More and more services are introducing two-step verification into their login process. It started with Google and Facebook, continued to Dropbox and Apple, with Twitter and LinkedIn joining the party only recently. Two-step verification, also known as two-factor authentication, is a security method which divides your login process into two steps: the first, enter your username and password; the second, enter a code sent to you via text message or a specialized app. Enabling this service makes it harder to break into your accounts, but also makes logging in more of a hassle. What’s your view on this?

What are the reasons to use or not use two-step verification? Tell us all about it in the comment below.

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Comments (30)
  • Matthew Steffen

    Yes, I use 2 step verification and i appreciate this because it is safe and also prevent id from hacker.

  • Tayo Banjo

    It is a good security practice. E.g. it makes my inbox access 99.9% secure .

  • doho

    The main reason I don’t use two-step verification is that for some reason they require you to have an expensive smartphone and a monthly bill.

    • Julie Smith

      You only need a smartphone if the service requires a code from an authentication app. Many services also support SMS as the 2nd factor. In that case, any phone capable of receiving an SMS message can be used. Depending on your country and carrier, this can be done quite cheaply. A friend in Australia has an old Nokia phone on a Virgin prepaid plan which costs only $15 for 180 days.

    • Rob H

      You do not need a phone, you can print off a list of one-time codes to keep in your wallet instead.

  • likefunbutnot

    I do not. Calls and SMS messages (and I have a whitelist of people who can SMS me anyway) to my phone number are delivered via Google voice to my email and/or the Google Voice app so that I don’t have to live my life tethered to a telephone in the first place. My phone isn’t particularly a unique identifier for me. I do have strong passwords and in some cases limit my access to certain online accounts to specific trusted computers, but I think two factor authentication is more hassle than it’s worth in my case.

  • Ryan Grassfield

    I know that for me, two step verification with Google doesn’t seem to work half the time. I have tried it and most of the time it doesn’t send me a code.

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For more details, please read our disclosure.
Affiliate Disclamer

This review may contain affiliate links, which pays us a small compensation if you do decide to make a purchase based on our recommendation. Our judgement is in no way biased, and our recommendations are always based on the merits of the items.

For more details, please read our disclosure.