Do You Still Own Physical Board & Puzzle Games? [MakeUseOf Poll]

Last week we asked you if you still check your email while on vacation. Despite the fact that some of you never take any vacations, we did get a nice variety of votes for this poll, which show an interesting picture.

Out of 234 votes in total, 5% check their email seldom while on vacation, and only if they have to; 7% don’t check their emails on vacation at all; 13% only check their personal emails and leave work emails out of it; 14% check their email every couple of days just to make sure there’s nothing urgent; 22% check their emails about once a day, even while on vacation; and 39% of the voters check their emails often, even while on vacation.

So the majority of the voters keep on checking their email no matter what. Is that harmless, or are we getting too connected for our own good?

Full results and this week’s poll after the jump.

Don’t forget to check out last week’s best comment by Vinit Nair, who won a free MakeUseOf t-shirt!

poll results poct 13   Do You Still Own Physical Board & Puzzle Games? [MakeUseOf Poll]

This week’s poll question is: Do You Still Own Physical Board & Puzzle Games?

Love our t-shirts? The best comment in this poll will get one of our geeky t-shirts. That’s right, for free! So get commenting!

This week, my friend bought a Rubik’s Cube. A real one. It brought back many childhood memories, and the realization that no software game will ever be able to truly replace this sophisticated puzzle. Monopoly, Uno, Settlers of Katan, Connect Four, Go… these are all very popular games that started as board games, but all of them have a tablet and even a smartphone version now. Do these software versions compare to the real thing? And do you still own the real games, or are they slowly going out of style?

Tell us in the comments everything you think about physical board games. What does the future hold for them?

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18 Comments -

Mike Rhodes

Scrabble is best as an analog game. It’s best when friends are socializing. And it’s just more fun than staring at a tablet.

Tiago R

actually here in Portugal the boardgame community exploded the last few years!!

sure they may play online(sometimes to test a game before buying)but the amount of physical boardgames being played is huge!!!

i think it’s because the real social interaction is as important has the game!

Paul R

Better believe it. Dollar for dollar, its about the best bang for your buck in terms of family entertainment. We paid $20 for a (slightly) overpriced Disney-branded kids game, but the hours and hours we’ve spent together playing it make it about as cheap as entertainment could possibly be. I bought a software scrabble game in the early days of the internet, that would let you play with others who had d/l the same game, via email. It was fun, but not nearly as much as people getting together and having some fun. And I’d throw into this category family card games as well. I can see why individuals spend money on gaming software, but its not the same as the human interaction that you get when you are sitting around a table and playing a board game. In this connected world we live in, I could see sales of board games drop, but I’m positive there will always be a niche.

Tiago R

and as for the future,just by my country hand’s on experience,the future is good…….i mean,people are always coming to the board game family,there is game night’s all over,and also national event’s!!!

Alan W

Yes, we have a number of board games and we usually spend one day a week (Saturday evening) playing one of them. In this day of technology it is too easy to get lost in computer land and forget about your family. Board games bring us back together as a family with a shared enjoyment.
Even when our grand-children visit we try to play a board game together, I believe it helps to learn them family values.

Daniele

Sure we play a lot!
Some new classics like Ticket to ride and King of Tokyo are often on my table.

I can only suggest to follow updates on this community:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/communities/111229977945579240171

And for curious people, to check out the Tabletop Youtube videos.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X9QtdiRJYro&list=PL4F80C7D2DC8D9B6C

Play more games!

Scott M

I love physical board games and I constantly find and buy new ones (or new to me ones). May I suggest Tales of the Arabian Nights? Wicked fun if you’re not scared off by piece count. The best story based games I’ve ever played.

Marte B

We keep some board games on hand for when my nieces visit. They enjoy playing Sorry and Monopoly. We also have a chessboard, chessmen and checkers. But visiting relatives are the only ones who use any of it.

Ryan S

Monopoly, Sorry, and Operation (the one that took the big’ol C batteries) were staples growing up & kept us competing with the neighbor kids. I have to admit it is a hell of a’lot easier to pick up after a game of Monopoly, Clue or Mouse Trap (all online) today than it was twenty some odd years ago.

Shannon

I’m a teacher, of course we play. We are studying the human body and my kids love playing Operation. Scrabble is great for spelling. Games will always be around.

Shawn Rosvold

My marriage hinges on Scrabble. My wife, Laurie, made me promise when I proposed to her that I would play Scrabble with her at least once a year or the marriage was over. So far, my love for her has overcome my distaste for games.

Kevin

Of course we do. The old trads like Chutes & Ladders with my kid. The Euro games that my wife, I, and friends play…Carcasonne, Knights of Catan, and whatever new games the truly obsessed players drag in. In fact, in our social circle, there are hosted games parties every few months to play the favorites and the new ones.

Michelle T

Of course, I live in the middle of no where. No TV channels, cable, or internet. Why else do you think I only have 2 kids. With out them we would be the Duggars.

dragonmouth

I would think that living in the middle of nowhere would lead to a larger family. :P

dragonmouth

Playing Monopoly on the computer just does not have the same impact as playing the board version

John

Four adults in our household, one of them is my daughter who is mildly developmentally disabled, but we have a lot of games that everyone can play.

The board game version of Bejeweled is fun and a great value because you get the PC unlock with it.

We play Monopoly but with many house rules, and I pass around my cellphone with a virtual dice app; Got tired of aggressive dice-throwers causing houses and hotels to scatter.

Another thing with our Monopoly, we went to thrift stores and picked up various special versions with different colors/styles of houses and hotels, so you can glance at the board and see which properties belong to which player. I guess the Youtubers would call that a “Monopoly Hack”.

Alec B

I always bring out the old A&A and Risk war board games when relatives come over to stay. They’ll crash the night after I bring the refreshments.

Llamanerds

The big draw of physical board games is that it is everything a computer game is not:
– Social: (most) board games require the interaction of another person, and not just some ethereal screen name, or voice on a head set, but an actual physical person whom you can see and touch and (for better or worse) smell. You can linger over a game of chess, and actually enjoy the company of another person.
– Tactile: I know several people who buy board games (or at least specific releases of them) based on the “bits”: the pieces and components that make up the flavor and texture of the game. Video game art can be astounding and amazing, but has yet to come close to the “resolution” of real life, even if you’re just pushing pawns around a board.
– Imaginative: “Immersive” computer games in many cases remove the user’s imagination from the game. Everything is force fed to you: the actions, the characters, the voices, the stories, the motivations. Physical board games allow the players the opportunity to impose (often humorous) narrative along side the actual game.