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In the current landscape, using an effective password manager You Need to Start Using a Password Manager Right Now You Need to Start Using a Password Manager Right Now By now, everyone should be using a password manager. In fact, not using a password manager put you at greater risk of being hacked! Read More is just as important for your security as installing a quality anti-virus suite, enabling two-step verification on your accounts, and making regular backups.

Most people consider LastPass to be the king of password managers — it’s packed with features and boasts more users than any of its competitors.

But it’s far from being the only option. In this article, I’m going to introduce you to some alternatives 5 Password Management Tools Compared: Find the One That's Perfect for You 5 Password Management Tools Compared: Find the One That's Perfect for You Choosing some sort of password management strategy to deal with the huge amount of passwords we need is crucial. If you're like most people, you probably store your passwords in your brain. To remember them... Read More . For each suggestion, I’ll give you one core benefit that distinguishes it from its ubiquitous rival.

1. KeePassX

KeePassX is perhaps the most well-known of all the LastPass alternatives. It’s entirely free, it’s open-source, and all your data is saved locally rather than in the cloud.

The fact that it’s open source is important. If you’re so inclined, it means you can check the source code of the app and ensure all the encryption methods are implemented correctly and operating perfectly.

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Of course, locally-saved data isn’t for everyone. If you regularly need to access your passwords on multiple computers and mobile devices, it’s a pain. You will need to move your password database around from device to device manually.

From a security standpoint, KeePassX uses the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) and the Twofish algorithm, and it relies on SHA-256 to hash your data. Interestingly, it doesn’t only encrypt your passwords — all the data fields within the app are also secured.

Core Benefit — Open source software app that saves data locally.

2. Dashlane

Dashlane is like LastPass in terms of functionality. Even the user interface is remarkably similar.

The app has five core features:

  1. Password Manager — Instantly save any password for any account.
  2. Form Autofill — If you do a lot of online shopping or regularly find yourself punching your address into online forms, the autofill feature will save you a lot of time.
  3. Digital Wallet — Not only will the digital wallet keep your payment details secure, but it also automatically captures the receipts of any online purchases you make.
  4. Password Generator — A password manager isn’t going to help if all your passwords are “hello123”. You need to create unique and complex strings How To Create A Safe Password That You Can Actually Remember How To Create A Safe Password That You Can Actually Remember Passwords are a tricky beast. You want a password that you can remember, but you also want to make sure it's secure. How do you find the balance? Read More for each individual account.
  5. Password Changer — The password changer can alter your weakest passwords without having to log into each account separately.

There’s also a premium version. It will set you back $39.99 per year but introduces syncing across multiple devices, account backup, two-step login authentication, and web access. It’s worth noting that lots of these features are available for free on LastPass and other services.

Dashlane comes into its own when accessing its security. It claims to have the strongest master password requirements in the industry, but more importantly, it also claims to have the best security architecture. The developers filed a security patent to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in March 2012,which was granted in February 2016. The developers go into great detail about all features on the Dashlane website.

Core Benefit — A customized and unique approach to data security and encryption.

3. In-Browser Password Manager

Most browsers have a password manager How To View Chrome’s Saved Passwords From Anywhere (And How To Stop It) How To View Chrome’s Saved Passwords From Anywhere (And How To Stop It) Having many online accounts requires so many passwords. And since it is now conventional wisdom that you need a strong password, you can't get away with PASSWORD or 12345. Read More . Every time you enter a password, you will be asked whether you want the browser to remember it. These managers are convenient if you use the same browser on all your devices; all your logins will be automatically synced across all your devices without needing to install third-party apps.

The security of these managers varies widely from browser to browser. For example, the Firefox manager offers a master password option, whereas Chrome just automatically populates your credentials on sites.

Chrome does offer a “sync passphrase” so if someone has your master Google Account password, they still won’t have access to your logins. Nonetheless, the bottom line is none of the browser-based solutions offer the same level of security as a dedicated manager.

Core Benefit — Simplicity. No new accounts, no hassle of dealing with third-party apps.

4. aWallet Password Manager

aWallet is a password manager for Android and iOS. There is no web version and no desktop version.

There are two versions of the app: a local version and a cloud version. The local version has no internet access permissions and saves all your sensitive data on your mobile device. The new cloud version can sync your passwords, credit card details, and online banking credentials with either Dropbox or Google Drive so you can access them on several devices.

The app encrypts all data fields and relies on AES and Blowfish algorithms with key sizes of 256, 192, and 128 bits. As an extra level of security, the app will automatically delete your local password data file after a predefined number of unsuccessful login attempts.

Both the Android and the iOS version require a one-off payment of $3.99.

Core Benefit — Mobile-centric for users who spent a lot of time on the road.

5. Keeper

Keeper offers all the usual features you expect, but there is one function which makes it a worthy addition to this list.

It’s the “Keeper Family Plan.” The developers understand that families share lots of digital things How to Safely Share Passwords With Friends and Family How to Safely Share Passwords With Friends and Family You should never share your passwords. But you do, don't you? That's why we're going to show you how to share your passwords while keeping your accounts as secure as possible. Read More  — whether it’s Netflix passwords, email logins, or Xbox accounts. The Family Plan is their attempt to offer a secure solution for sharing.

You can add five users, each of whom gets a private vault and 10 GB of secure file sharing space. You can bounce passwords bounced between vaults with nothing more than your fingerprint.

Best of all, the “legacy” feature lets you automatically share insurance forms, medical records, estate planning documents, tax documents, etc. with your next of kin if you pass away.

The individual plan is $29.99 per year. The family plan is $59.99 per year.

Core Benefit — The best service for large families who share lots of data.

Which Password Management App Do You Use?

I’ve introduced you to five password manager alternatives to LastPass, but there are many more out there. Each has its own strengths and weaknesses.

Obviously, I’d love to know which password manager app you rely on. Are you a fan of RoboForm or Sticky Password? Perhaps you like 1Password or Passpack?

What makes your app of choice so unique? Let me know your thoughts and opinions in the comments section below.

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  1. Sarah
    March 13, 2017 at 2:50 pm

    I use Keeper every day, all day long for personal and business use to store and remember more than 100 passwords for the various websites I work on and manage. I can seamlessly move from my computer to my phone when on-the-go as well using my Keeper Android App. Generating passwords is simple. You just click the icon to create. I also love that I am able to save additional fields like security questions and notes. Remembering just one password is a must for me, and if it is a must for you, then Keeper Security is the solution you have been looking for!

  2. @mauricioformigli
    March 12, 2017 at 9:15 pm

    keeepersecurity.com is very good!

  3. Jon Tanz
    March 5, 2017 at 1:52 am

    The article refers to keeper as having all the usual features but does not mention the unique ability to have custom design in the saving of information other than just form filling and passwords

  4. Salvatore Porcillo
    March 4, 2017 at 4:46 pm

    I've been using Keeper Password for over 5 years and love it. It's incredibly useful, handy, affordable and secure.

    I have most of my family, kids, brother and sister and friends using it.

    It's awesome.

  5. CJ
    March 3, 2017 at 6:47 pm

    I've been a user of Keeper for several years and love it. It has been flawless in its use, provided the level of security I expect, and is intuitive to work with. I don't go online without it.

  6. Philip Leech
    March 2, 2017 at 3:05 am

    Keeper is the best one. Its cross platform, super secure and very easy-to-us!

  7. Philip Leech
    March 2, 2017 at 3:05 am

    keeper is the best one. its cross platform, hyper secure and super easy to use.

  8. Peter Everett
    March 1, 2017 at 9:47 am

    You should mention how well KeePass integrates with dropbox so that your password database can be synced across any PC/tablet/laptop etc.

  9. Bill Cooper
    February 28, 2017 at 1:11 pm

    Used SplashID for many years on windows phones, PCs, IOS and Macs. Got it all does it all.

  10. Dave
    February 28, 2017 at 11:09 am

    Like others, don't understand why Roboform is not on these lists. Best things I ever did was sign up with them years ago. Even managed to use it on Linux, in a lite form, but nevertheless it worked. Also use it on my Android phone...

  11. J.C. R.
    February 28, 2017 at 2:28 am

    I use Keeper and love it.It's the #1 downloaded password app and for good reason. The interface face is simple to use, but the back end security is top notch. With 256 AES encryption, up to 100,000 PBKDF2 iterations, and 2 step authtication. It's available for all platforms and has add ons for Chrome and Firefox. Easily syncs to all your devices and does a backup in a couple seconds. Love the figerprint authentication on the iPhone. I've tried others and Keeper is the best by far. Plus they've never been hacked like LastPass and have a 3rd party paid audit done. Right now they have a 50% discount on iTunes.

  12. Pat Kevt
    February 28, 2017 at 12:16 am

    I have used Roboform for several years. I tried LastPass when Roboform got a little buggy, but didn't find an easy way to convert.

  13. Steven Kopischke
    February 27, 2017 at 11:08 pm

    I have used 1Password for almost seven years. Excellent app for Apple devices.

    • Anuschka
      February 28, 2017 at 9:20 am

      I've used 1Password for about 5 years. I've never used anything else so I can't compare it to lastpass. It works well for me because it syncs with all my apple devices.

  14. Paula-Dawn
    February 27, 2017 at 8:15 pm

    Whats wrong with LastPass?

  15. Charles G.
    February 27, 2017 at 5:16 pm

    I've used RoboForm for years and wonder why it rarely shows up on such lists.

  16. Prasanna
    February 27, 2017 at 4:49 pm

    KeePass with Dropbox works better for me.

  17. Kilroy
    February 27, 2017 at 4:31 pm

    I guess my question would be why use any of these applications over LastPass. I've been a LastPass premium user for over five years and paid for an additional 10 years when they were purchased by LogMeIn to protect against price increases. At $1 per month their pricing blows away the competition.

    While LastPass does store your passwords they are unable to read them or give them to a third party as they only store an encrypted version which you encrypt and send to them. LastPass provides for sharing your passwords, you send a link to the person. LastPass also provides the ability for one time use passwords that can be used in case of your demise. LastPass allows for two factor authentication. I use LastPass on my home computers, work computer, iPhone, and Kindle Fire all for $1 a month.

    Using it for work is handy as I frequently have to sign up for accounts to support work applications. As a contractor when I leave it is nice to be able to give them a list of the sites with my user name (work e-mail) and password, so that they know what sites I needed and the passwords to access them in the future after I am no longer there.

  18. Mark Wiechec
    February 27, 2017 at 3:43 pm

    The KeePass data file can be stored in the cloud (e.g. google drive, onedrive). The app can be installed on multiple machines and use the file from cloud. Also there is an android app KeePass2Android (not by the same author) that can access the same file from the cloud. This allows me to get at my passwords from all my devices.

  19. Dub Dublin
    February 23, 2017 at 9:37 pm

    Passpack, FTW. Easily shareable with teams (vital for non-trivial real world use), secure (good encryption, non-encrypted passwords NEVER stored), works from any platform since it's a web app, and can be easily and securely backed up anywhere using any backup method you choose. Oh, and browser integration is decent, too...

  20. lilpas
    February 23, 2017 at 4:32 pm

    I need to access my passwords on various machines, OS and browsers. For that I use an online password manager since years : htpps://clipperz.is . Nothing to install and you can even download a protected offline copy of your passwords. Nice !

  21. Neil Smith
    February 23, 2017 at 1:13 pm

    I use SafeInCloud. It is free and works well. Having said that, I will probably switch to bitwarden once they get their Firefox extension approved.

  22. Tapan
    February 23, 2017 at 10:42 am

    LastPass FTW. Been using it for years now. Sync is great, almost all the devices I have used lastpass plus everywhere. It's just hassle free and most economical too for premium version.

  23. Daniel
    February 23, 2017 at 9:57 am

    I've been a user of Roboform for PC, Everywhere, and Android for almost 10 years. Followed the evolution of the software which had its hick ups here and there. But overall, it is of easy use and practical in all environments.

  24. John
    February 23, 2017 at 2:47 am

    So lastpass wins, no contest.

  25. Ícaro
    February 23, 2017 at 2:32 am

    I use Enpass. It’s free for Mac.
    The iOS version has a limit os passwords that you can store, but you pay once and the full app is unlocked.

  26. Will English
    February 22, 2017 at 6:36 pm

    I have become increasing uncomfortable with password managers that have remote access to my passwords (example - Lastpass that I have used for years). Recently I have been doing a migration to Enpass - with which I am very happy. They have been doing some interesting developments with the product that is free for desktops & services most platforms.

  27. Henrik Schack
    February 22, 2017 at 6:18 pm

    I would never use Dashlane, they don't protect their customers against fake @dashlane.com email, no DMARC deployed.

  28. Bruce
    February 22, 2017 at 3:29 pm

    I used KeePass for many years. Switched to LastPass a few years ago and have not looked back. By the way, LastPass also has family shareable passwords, which was not mentioned here.

  29. Ebbe Kristensen
    February 22, 2017 at 2:56 pm

    Roboform Everywhere. Its only downsides are that there is no Linux client and that the mobile clients (especially IOS) can be a bit difficult to use.

  30. Jim Finn
    February 22, 2017 at 2:44 pm

    Have been using Enpass for the last couple of years after being a log time Lastpass user.

    Very happy with it but for one issue. The exported file is not a standard csv making it difficult to pass into an alternative but very happy otherwise,

  31. Neil Watson
    February 22, 2017 at 2:31 pm

    I use Keepass and have done for years. If you have your password database in one of your Dropbox folders, then the local save issue is no longer there. It's automatically available to all your devices that can access your Dropbox account.