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file sharing sitesHaving the ability to share large files is very important to a lot of people.

For instance, the other day I wanted to send a 25MB video file to a friend. Most email programs only allow for up to 10MB at a time so email was not an option. Who wants to put it on a USB drive and drive over to their friend’s house?

I wanted to be able to just send it to them. No hassles. No installing funky programs. No waiting to upload to some server in cyberspace and have them wait for it to download again. So what to do?


Let’s narrow down what the file-sending needs (or wants) are:

  1. Free – as in no charges whatsoever
  2. Browser-based – no installation of some program and, therefore, cross platform
  3. Peer to peer – no waiting for uploading and downloading; just the send time
  4. The ability to send large files – no file-size limit

When I began to search the Internet for file sharing sites, I wasn’t sure what the easiest solution would be.  What I found out was that there are quite a few file-sending options, but I had criteria. We all have standards, don’t we? Check out these five choices which meet the criteria shared above.

FilesOverMiles

FilesOverMiles does what it sounds like it does: it helps you send files over miles.

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file sharing sites

Their subtitle “Browser-to-browser Filesharing” tells us that it fits our criteria. When someone sets up a file to send, a URL is created. Just share the URL and stay online for the actual sending.

JetBytes

I like the name “JetBytes” because it speaks to the speed in which peer-to-peer transferring actually affords.

peer to peer file sharing

This file sharing site makes it easy referring to “on-the-fly” transfers and all that. Be careful, just as in any of these peer-to-peer tools, don’t try to open the created link yourself. Doing that will only be letting you download the file back to yourself and blocking your friend from downloading it. No too smart.

PipeBytes

From the site: “Instantly send music, movies, presentations or any other files to anybody!” Thanks, for telling us what any of these peer-to-peer tools do for us. OK, I’m just kidding around.

peer to peer file sharing

You’ll notice that PipeBytes actually gives some sharing options. You can either send the recipient the URL or a pick-up code which they’ll enter at the home page. Easy-peasy either way.

xFiles

Oh, you have to love the name for this one. Some weird television show is creeping around in my mind now.

peer to peer file sharing

All sci-fi weirdness put aside, this file sharing site puts peer-to-peer into easy to understand words: “Exchange big files directly without uploading to a server.” If you are transferring peer-to-peer, the uploading and downloading all happens at once making everything quick and easy.

Dushare

Dushare is a tool not recently mentioned here on MakeUseOf. You can share a file peer-to-peer, password protect it, and even chat while the transfer takes place because who wants to pick up a phone?

file sharing sites

Seriously though, out of all of the rest of the file sharing sites mentioned here, I think Dushare has the prettiest looking website design.  Oh, and in case you are wondering what sequence things will happen in, you have some nifty icons showing you.  You can’t beat that.

You’ll notice that there wasn’t much to say about each of these tools. That’s because they all pretty much do the same thing: send any sized files, directly to another person quickly, easily and for no charge. And that’s about all they do. Test them out and see which performs the best and which is the easiest to use. Then come and tell us in the comments which is best.

How do you send large files over the Internet and why do you use that method?

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  1. mitchdcba12
    November 23, 2010 at 4:47 am

    People use P2P file sharing softwares for downloading files like, mp3 musics, videos, softwares, games, photos etc. I have been using http://www.diskme.com and FastestP2P for downloading.
    free file sharing

  2. ozmankle
    October 1, 2010 at 1:49 pm

    Banckle File Sharing http://banckle.com/products/fi... also supports file sharing and online backup services in the cloud with support of all advanced files storage features. It is reasonably priced, subscriptions starts from only $5 per month with 5 GB storage space and supported file upload size is up to 1GB. File sharing is highly password-protected and SSL encryption is employed while you send or received files. You can sign up http://banckle.com/action/sign... for a 30 days free evaluation version and test the app is real time.

  3. Abdel
    September 28, 2010 at 12:02 pm

    Does anyone know which script these websites uses ??

  4. Joost Bloemsma
    September 4, 2010 at 4:28 pm

    Does anyone know if there is a P2P site that doesn't use Flash, Silverlight, Java applet or any other plugin technology, but simply relies on HTML, javascript and XMLHTTPRequest?

  5. navaneetharan
    September 4, 2010 at 2:11 am

    you have left out opera.probably the best file sharing tool.i have shared GBs of data.and the picture sharing is great too.

  6. dsf74
    August 30, 2010 at 10:24 pm

    The big problems with such services are 1. auto resumes of interrupted transfers and 2. capability to send only one file at a time. I use Binfer [http://www.binfer.com] to transfer hundreds of files directly from computer to computer [p2p]. It does auto resumes and supports drag and drop of multiple files.

  7. Anonymous
    August 30, 2010 at 8:24 pm

    The big problems with such services are 1. auto resumes of interrupted transfers and 2. capability to send only one file at a time. I use Binfer [http://www.binfer.com] to transfer hundreds of files directly from computer to computer [p2p]. It does auto resumes and supports drag and drop of multiple files.

  8. Matt
    August 30, 2010 at 4:03 pm

    OK, so FilesOverMiles has a file size limit based on your computer RAM, due to Adobe, it says. So, assuming this is typical of these, what is a good approach to send a VM, which averages say 12gB. We typically use a thumbdrive in the mail.

  9. Isteve
    August 29, 2010 at 6:39 pm

    I forgot, thank you TJB for this excellent info,I had no idea that such an option existed.

    So often I have wanted to send stuff to my Brother in Scotland and changed my mind at the trouble in doing so, one of the mentioned ways is ideal.
    Thanks again

  10. Isteve
    August 29, 2010 at 4:39 pm

    I forgot, thank you TJB for this excellent info,I had no idea that such an option existed.

    So often I have wanted to send stuff to my Brother in Scotland and changed my mind at the trouble in doing so, one of the mentioned ways is ideal.
    Thanks again

    • Frank
      August 30, 2010 at 9:53 pm

      i guess encryption would be the way to go. of course i was concerned with p2p because of all the underground stuff that goes on with p2p. i was wondering about the affect on a strategy such as these aformentioned sites

  11. Isteve
    August 29, 2010 at 6:36 pm

    Regarding security I guess it depends on what your sending and how its sent.
    I doubt if I would use the sites password option as then they have it if they want it.
    I'm more likely to compress the file and password that then send it.

  12. Isteve
    August 29, 2010 at 4:36 pm

    Regarding security I guess it depends on what your sending and how its sent.
    I doubt if I would use the sites password option as then they have it if they want it.
    I'm more likely to compress the file and password that then send it.

  13. frank
    August 29, 2010 at 3:50 am

    Yes security is the concern

    • timmyjohnboy
      August 30, 2010 at 2:13 pm

      The tip Isteve gave is a good one of you're concerned. Try encrypting the file before transmission.

  14. Frank
    August 28, 2010 at 7:34 pm

    this all seems good not using a 3rd party server but should i be concerned that we are using p2p here? thanks for your time

    • timmyjohnboy
      August 29, 2010 at 1:54 am

      What kind of concern? Security?

  15. Jessica Cam W.
    August 28, 2010 at 9:38 am

    Nice! There's also FileAi which has been featured.

    • timmyjohnboy
      August 28, 2010 at 12:49 pm

      Thanks Jessica.

  16. User
    August 28, 2010 at 8:28 am

    how can you leave out http://www.isendr.com/ ?

  17. hdxz
    August 28, 2010 at 2:28 am

    Can you please give us an idea of the speeds you were getting? Speed is the one important factor you left out here.

    • timmyjohnboy
      August 28, 2010 at 3:24 am

      The speeds would depend on the sender's and the receiver's bandwidth, I'm sure. The particular service plays a part too no doubt.

  18. cedance
    August 27, 2010 at 9:57 pm

    Dropbox / Opera Unite. I still find these better.

    • timmyjohnboy
      August 28, 2010 at 3:30 am

      With dropbox, the files are actually being uploaded to a server, correct? Not sure about opera's Unite. These tools in this article were specifically P2P w/o uploading to 3rd party servers.

      • Guest
        August 28, 2010 at 1:36 pm

        Opera Unite is P2P