4 Great Sites To Rate and Review Teachers & Professors

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rate my teacherDo you remember your favorite teacher? What about the ones you couldn’t stand?

With summer break winding down for many students, it’ll be time to get back to their studies soon. With that comes the responsibility of registering for classes for the new semester and maybe some burning questions in the back of your mind.

“Is this class going to be hard?” “What’s the professor like?” With the Web, it’s easy to find out what other students think of the teacher before you take the class. Read up on their reviews and check out how others rate college professors so that you can be better prepared, have an idea of what to expect, and know who you may want to steer clear of.

Don’t wait until the first day. Here are the 4 best “rate my teacher” sites to rate and review teachers or professors.

Rate My Professors

Rate My Professors is one of the most popular “rate my teacher” websites on the Web. The site boasts more than 10 million opinions of over 1 million professors from students like you. The ratings cover more than 6,000 schools across the United States, Canada, England, Scotland, and Wales.

rate my teacher

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Just search by professor or just find your school first by entering in its name. Displayed on every professor’s page is the overall rating, followed by ratings on helpfulness, clarity, and easiness.

rate your teacher

Below that are the actual reviews, showing the class, how the users rate college professors, and any comments.

rate your teacher

Rate My Teachers

RateMyTeachers is another popular review site. This time, however, the focus is on elementary and secondary school teachers only for the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand.

rate your teacher

Again, here you can search for your teacher by name or search for your school for the full list of teachers. Once on the teacher’s page, you can rate your teacher right there. It’s another simple 1 to 5 rating system, with the categories including easiness, helpfulness, clarity, and popularity.

rate a teacher

Ratings and reviews are displayed just below that. If you’d like to know when the teacher is commented or rated on, just hit the “Follow” button and type in your email address to receive updates.

MyEdu

rate a teacher

The academic website MyEdu also features how students rate college professors. What sets this site apart from others is that it claims to be the only community that works directly with universities to post the actual end-of-semester course and even the professor evaluations that students fill out in class.

rate a teacher

The only catch is that you have to sign up to the Rate My Teacher site. With a free account, you’re limited to only the latest three reviews (if there are any). Upgrading your account gets you in-depth information about not only the professor but also the class in general, including grade history, drop rate, and more.

Professor Performance

For the United States and Canada only, Professor Performance is another useful review site for colleges and universities. Just browse by schools or search by professor to get started.

rate my teacher

The rating system is a bit more unique than others, with letter grades, comment, and simple positive and negative columns.

Do you use any of these websites and have they helped you at all? Let us know in the comments.

Image Credit: marc buehler

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Comments (11)
  • 8th Grade Student

    I agree with jimmy. Classes can and should be challenging to students, but teachers should be there to help teach the material in an easily understandable way. Classes don’t need to be difficult to be good.

  • 8th Grade Student

    Another problem is that people will say that their teacher is good just because he/she is funny or makes the class interesting. A fun class is helpful in getting good grades, but the purpose of school is unfortunately not to have fun. It is to actually learn something and become a better, more productive member of society. If a teacher is CONSTANTLY goofing off or trying to make you laugh, I personally would not say he/she is a good teacher. A little fun is all right, but school is not supposed to be a comedy show.

  • Dave Drager

    I am also torn about these sites – on one hand they are good to get an idea of what a teacher is like, but also a teacher that may seem ‘bad’ because they are tough on you might actually be good for you in the long run. Good overview!

    • jimmy

      Difficulty is not a virtue my friend. The whole point of a teacher is to take a difficult concept, break it down into easier chunks and teach it. If they are not unable to do that, doesn’t it say something to hide behind the “difficult” label? I think many people who have had very good teachers are the ones who inspire them to work harder, master topics and push their abilities to the limit. If a person is a “tough” teacher they often don’t have the ability to teach the topic and is hiding behind the “tough” part to cover their own fragile ego. But who is getting hurt in the end? The student. IN the end “communication is the response you get.” If you get a person who is mad at you and feels angry at you and is frustrated with you. That is communication too – to a teacher that wants to improve.

  • Jake

    I’m a teacher who gets excellent reviews on these kinds of sites, I’m told, but I don’t even visit them. If I take the good reviews seriously, I’d have to do the same with the bad ones, which I refuse to do. If students had to identify themselves, the ratings might have some validity, but it’s all too easy to take potshots at someone behind the shield of anonymity.

    A high rating usually means that the class time was ‘fun’ or ‘entertaining’ and that the student got a good grade. Being a stand-up comedian and handing out stellar grades have little to do with being an effective teacher.

    You’d also be surprised how many unofficial, private ‘Rate My Student’ sites are out there; what’s good for the goose is good for the gander.

    • jimmy

      Jake, you are the person in the position of power. So if they identify themselves, they would be forced to withhold some of the sting. There are teacher who respect their students and there are teachers that don’t. The ones that respect their students read the positive and negative. Why? So they can learn about what is working and what might not be working. The fact that you already have a position of power relative to students and still feel like having an unofficial private rate my student site shows that you should not be teaching…..you are just to sensitive for the title of “nation builder”.

  • Jake

    I’m a teacher who gets excellent reviews on these kinds of sites, I’m told, but I don’t even visit them. If I take the good reviews seriously, I’d have to do the same with the bad ones, which I refuse to do. If students had to identify themselves, the ratings might have some validity, but it’s all too easy to take potshots at someone behind the shield of anonymity.

    A high rating usually means that the class time was ‘fun’ or ‘entertaining’ and that the student got a good grade. Being a stand-up comedian and handing out stellar grades have little to do with being an effective teacher.

    You’d also be surprised how many unofficial, private ‘Rate My Student’ sites are out there; what’s good for the goose is good for the gander.

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This review may contain affiliate links, which pays us a small compensation if you do decide to make a purchase based on our recommendation. Our judgement is in no way biased, and our recommendations are always based on the merits of the items.

For more details, please read our disclosure.
Affiliate Disclamer

This review may contain affiliate links, which pays us a small compensation if you do decide to make a purchase based on our recommendation. Our judgement is in no way biased, and our recommendations are always based on the merits of the items.

For more details, please read our disclosure.