4 Apple OSX Interface Elements That Really Annoy Me [Opinion]

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osx derp   4 Apple OSX Interface Elements That Really Annoy Me [Opinion]Contrary to popular belief, I’m not a Apple fanboy. I don’t think I need to make excuses for advocating Apple as I have been known to do on occasion, but regardless, even us so-called ‘fanboys’ detest some of the nonsense that Apple comes up with.

Here’s 4 user interface elements from OSX that really irk me.

Close Buttons – That Don’t Actually Close

I really couldn’t care less if the Apple operating system paradigm dictates that applications can be running without a window – it’s ridiculous. When I click the close button, I want you to close – quit, be gone, vanish, cease to be running, and void your memory usage. If the app has multiple windows, it should be plainly obviously that after closing the last one, I’m done with the app. I don’t want it sitting in my dock.

To this day, I end up with hundreds of apps sitting there redundant. I may have 12GB of memory, but that doesn’t mean I don’t care about conserving it when I can. Sure I could remember the simple CMD-Q keyboard shortcut, but why put that red button there at all? Red means STOP. Deal with it, Apple.

silly icons   4 Apple OSX Interface Elements That Really Annoy Me [Opinion]

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The Green Maximise Button

There is pretty much zero consistency as to what this button actually does, even within Apple’s own apps. In Safari, it maximises the browser window vertically, making it fill the full height of the screen, but not touching the horizontal width. In Garageband, it maximises both vertically and horizontally, kind of how I might expect it to. In iTunes, the maximise button actually minimises the window into the tiny little mini-player thing.

What on earth is going on there, Apple?!

maximised   4 Apple OSX Interface Elements That Really Annoy Me [Opinion]

Non-Standard Button Positions

In the initial release of iTunes 10, the standard window controls were moved so they were positioned vertically rather than horizontally. Admittedly, this has been fixed now, but still some developers, such as Panic in their latest Coda release, chose to use the style. What’s wrong with you? Do you think flying in the face of convention makes your app cool? It doesn’t.

vertical buttons   4 Apple OSX Interface Elements That Really Annoy Me [Opinion]

Launchpad

The latest absurd trend in computing – now present in Ubuntu’s Unity GUI, Windows 8 Metro UI, and OSX – is the dreaded wall of icons. If I’m completely honest, I’d say this is a pretty bad way of browsing apps on iOS too, but I don’t use nearly as many iPad apps as I do OSX apps, so the problem is somewhat mitigated.

wall of icons   4 Apple OSX Interface Elements That Really Annoy Me [Opinion]

On my iOS devices, I keep my most used apps in folders on the taskbar; everything else, I just search for. My 27″ iMac allows for a lot in the taskbar too, but I only use it for apps with names I can’t remember. That, and it just fills with stuff I forget to close properly because the damned red X doesn’t do what it should do. This is your fault, Apple:

taskbar   4 Apple OSX Interface Elements That Really Annoy Me [Opinion]

Faced with that, I simply invoke my favourite spotlight-style single search interface – Alfred – and type in the name, or even just the first few letters, of the app I want or a file I need to open directly for editing. Not once have I ventured into the LaunchPad other than to ask myself “WT* is this?”.

alfred   4 Apple OSX Interface Elements That Really Annoy Me [Opinion]

So you see, even a so-called Apple fanboy is able to see faults in Apple products; they’re far from perfect.

Perhaps we could stay away from abusive comments this time, eh? Let’s think about how to move things on, instead. How would you fix these OSX faults? What would your ultimate interface be?

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98 Comments - Write a Comment

Reply

daniel anik

my biggest annoyance with OS X is that finder doesn’t have cut and paste! sure you can cut and past within documents, but you can’t do this when managing files. i completely don’t understand why everything has to be dragging and dropping.

what you are forced to do is copy a file to another location, then delete the original.

muotechguy

Great point, that is incredibly annoying! Why on earth can you copy but not CUT!!! GYA!!!

Rich

Command+C copies the files or documents

Command+Option+V pastes the documents into the new location, cutting it from the prior locating and moving it to the new location

So, not cut and paste (how does that even make sense for files, what happens if you never paste? Is Cut = to move to trash, then paste = restore to new place?), just move, as you’d expect to happen.

muotechguy

Rich, thanks for the tip! Though honestly, I don’t see the misunderstanding here with cut for files. It’s put them in the clipboard, same as a piece of text, or a picture. Why is that so wrong?

Rich

Text or an image is singular, files are plural.
Text or images can be recreated, a whole directory shouldn’t be vaporised
Text or images are small, files are big

I suspect the reasoning essentially is that the clipboard is an imaginary place, and really is a poor metaphor. Move makes way more sense than cut and paste in every use case IMO. I suspect if a new OS was designed today, it wouldn’t have a cut function at all.

Freejack

I know from being a MAC AND a Windows user how cut and paste is usefull. It is sad that in Mac OS X the option is not there, but my guess is for one reason. I actually see kind of problem when your doing cut and paste in a big environnement, with servers, etc. When you actually cut and paste, you keep the original security from where the file came from (in Windows) and this is a major problem. Somethime, users lose the access to the file because the security of the parent folder do not reapply in a ‘cut and paste’ fonction. Maybe that’s why in OS X this option is not availble because the system needs good security. Actually, when you install something in OS X, it is recommended to rebuild security… so if not, you may have some weird reaction because of the security. That my opinion, I don’t know if it’s really an explanation, but that’s my guess.

bram

I suspect the reasoning essentially is that the clipboard is an imaginary place, and really is a poor metaphor.

Then that reasoning is poor, because as far as metaphores go, ‘copying’ files to move them (with the additional action of pushing shift when pasting) is a metaphore with no kind of reasonable motivation.

Juan

Dont know why you cant cut files and directories(Not an OSX user), but when you copy/cut files and directories you are actually putting the path to their location in the clipboard not the files/directories by itself.

Tom

I use cut and paste all the time, using standard Command + X, and I’ve never had the “dual item” issue as discussed.

Juan

It actually makes sense or when you copy some files and never paste it, does they get duplicated in that folder?

Anestis

Ermm, I use cut and paste to copy and move files all the time in Finder.

Command-C or Command-X and Command-V.

muotechguy

You must have some kind of hack going on, because command-X does not work for me. CUT is greyed out on the edit menu for finder too.

Anestis

No hack. Default behaviour. been using it since Mac OS 8 and 9.

Sounds like something is corrupt for you.

Go into Disk utility and do a Detect and Repair and Repair permissions.

Akternatively, delete the Finder plist file in the Library.

muotechguy

No, I believe you’re wrong. Numerous sources say it was removed from Mac OSX.

Anestis

I can do it right now on the latest version of Mac OS X on my MacBook pro.

It has not been removed, and I have no hack running.

Replying to my own post because I can’t reply tot he one below.

if you want me to prove it I’d be happy to do a FaceTime session and show you.

Anestis

My apologies. It is Command-C for copy (both seem to work) and Command-Option-V for paste to move it to the new location.

Being a keyboard shortcut person i do it without thinking, and my muscle memory changes depending if I’m in front of a Windows PC or a Mac.

I keep forgetting to add the Option button.

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daniel anik

i thought of another annoyance. why is it that you can resize windows from any side in lion, but can’t do that in previous versions? you’ve been able to do that in windows and linux for a very long time. i absolutely hated having to move the window to the left in order to have it fill the screen by grabbing the right corner.

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Mulder

I think you’re confusing what you want, vs. what Apple has established since the beginning of OS X.

The modal buttons at the top of every window do not mean ‘Stop, Caution, or Go’, or even what you labelled them as in your post. The red button is clearly designed to close (quit) a window, not Quit the application. It’s always been that way, so acting as though this is some affront to common sense or your fragile sensibilities is nonsense. The Quit command has been in Mac OS even longer than Mac OS X has existed, and yet you haven’t complained about it until now.

Likewise, I don’t know about your particular setup, but in my years of using 10.2, 10.3, 10.4, 10.5, and 10.6, the green button on the window in Safari (and other applications) does not do something completely random, as you want us to believe. In Safari and every other application I have, it expands the window both vertically and horizontally to fill the screen, and clicking it again causes it to revert to it’s previous size, every time.

In the version of iTunes I’m running the modal buttons are still vertical when the window is set to display the player only. However, that doesn’t bother me at all, and I rarely have it running that way.

I can’t speak for Launchpad, since I don’t use it.

muotechguy

Hmm, I run 10.7.4 and have the latest Safari. It only expands vertically for me, and there no consistent behaviour. Perhaps its a Lion thing?

Brian

I also haven’t seen it fill the screen horizontally. If anything it goes wide enough to show your content, but again, not ALL the time. The author is right, it’s not quite perfect.

Rich

The green button is zoom. I.e. make the window fit the contents. In safari, for instance, if the website is 960px wide, then green will ensure the width is at least 960, and the height will likely be higher than your screen, hence it will “maximise” vertically.

This makes a hell of a lot of sense, on Windows, you’ll find they have an equivalent that just makes things full screen, usually meaning most of the screen is just white or grey or whatever the default background of that app is.

muotechguy

And for a website that isn’t fixed width? Sorry, this just doesn’t make sense. Maximise means make it as big as it can be, not dynamically resize to what this particular app thinks is appropriate to the current content being displayed.

Simon Slangen

That’s right, but the green button is not “maximise”, so you shouldn’t expect it to maximise. It’s actually called “zoom”, like Rich said.

muotechguy

that makes even less sense semantically. Zoom implies everything gets larger – text, icons, all. Zoom is what a magnifying utility does. A window is *maximised*, not zoomed. If I double-tap a column of text somewhere in safari, it is zoomed. Zooming does not mean maximise in one direction only, nor does it mean turn my itunes window into a tiny player.

velinn

It makes plenty of sense. Stop thinking in terms of how Windows works and wanting a Mac to do what Windows does, and accept what Macs do. The button does not maximize, nor is it even called maximize. That is a windows word, and Windows fucntionality. What the actual button does is resize a window to the largest it can be (ie, some side of the window touches an edge of the screen) to fit the contents that is within that window. Use preview and various res photos and you’ll see how it works. The size of the window will be as big as possible, but the actual dimensions of the window will be different depending on the dimensions of the photo within it. It makes perfect sense that Safari is going to be taller vertically, thats how web pages work.

James Bruce

Lol. In most articles I’m getting labelled a fanboy for hating on Windows. I dare to speak against silly Mac UI choices and suddenly I’m trying to make everything think like Windows!

It’s called Zoom, that button is. And it doesn’t zoom at all. So let’s not argue about what it’s called.

You also seem rather presumptious about how web pages work. Here’s an example – go to http://smashingmagazine.com , which uses a responsive theme to best take advantage of wide monitors. Safari makes it as wide as the @media width, but if you make it wider by dragging the sides out you’ll see the site adjusts to suit the browser size better, adding fucntionality and re-laying elements. Why does Safari presume it knows best? It doesn’t.

Habib Alamin

If you think the smashingmagazine website needs more space than Safari gives it, you can always resize it from the side. If you ever want to maximise, that implies you don’t want to concentrate on other apps within the same space, which is what the fullscreen button is for in Lion and ML. Use it!

Mulder

It must be a bug in Lion, in which case I’d start emailing Apple executives demanding a fix, and downgrade to 10.6 unless and until they fix it.

Mac OS X 10.4 was the best version so far; every version since then introduces new bugs or deliberately removes features without prior disclosure that worked perfectly well before. That’s why I don’t upgrade just because a new version comes out.

Rich

I agree. I suspect that the person writing this doesn’t actually understand what is going on here. Launchpad yeah, it’s not useful. Red = close window, not close app. That’s why it’s on the window,

If the window is the app, then they are the same thing, and some basic apps are just a window, for instance system preferences.

Mike DeGeorge

Sorry, but I don’t agree with your logic. Close means close the application…meaning terminating it.

Rich

The button is on the window, hence it closes the window. If you want to, you can also quit the application, but you rarely want to do that, for obvious reasons. If I close my keynote document, I don’t expect keynote to quit!

In addition, now RAM is so plentiful, it’s rare you even need to quit an app, unless it crashes, or really does eat ram, like a game. For things like keynote, mail, chrome etc there isn’t rally any point quitting them. On lion, by default the lights on the dock are hidden, so you can’t tell if the app is open or not. I originally thought that was dumb, but actually it makes a lot of sense – why does it make any difference?

david

I like to know my embarrassing porn is gone when I click the exit button, or maybe that’s just me?

Habib Alamin

“If I close my keynote document, I don’t expect keynote to quit!”

Thank you! So many times I’ve closed the final window on Windows or Linux and the app quits, but I just wanted to work on a new document. I then have to restart the whole app again. It’s like the new “Duplicate” function in Lion, which is much worse than “Save As” (although Versions does really mean Save As isn’t as needed as before), you have to do things ‘awkwardly’. First, I have to open the new document, then switch to the old, then close the old. It’s much easier to just close the old, open the new.

AH

Nope, “close” is for windows. “Quit” is for applications. And, as Rich mentions, OS X is moving toward making quitting unimportant. There are no lights on the Dock. It’s like iOS where exiting an app doesn’t quit it.

Cutler

I like how that uses the ram that i like to save as much as possible for my games and other max fps things! That is why i like windows, because my schools macs are impossible to fix or use, and the windows ones work without a hitch.

Juan

Can you help me finding the difference between close button and minimize button?

Rich

Close closes the window. It’s gone. The application is still running though.

Minimise just hides the windows (yep, I know OSX also has hide, but it’s basically just minimise without the animation!), it’s still there, ready to go when you need it.

Habib Alamin

You can set it in SysPrefs so that minimise actually places an icon in the dock, instead of just minimising to the app icon. That way, minimise and hide are a bit more different. Although, without that setting, the difference is that “Hide” hides the app, “Minimise” hides the window.

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Brian

Great article. I’ve been griping about the green button since I switched from windows in 2007. It’s random! Incredibly frustrating. I feel somewhat vindicated! Thank you.

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Southy

maximise?

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Ewiggin

Check out RightZoom.
http://www.blazingtools.com/downloads.html
It makes the green button behave almost exactly like the maximize button in Windows

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Guntis Bukalders

Close button closes currently open document, not the app itself. This is Windows logic to close app by clicking Close button. On the Mac apps don’t have their own windows, only documents have windows which can be closed. Apps are closed with a Quit command. Very logical.
Maximise button isn’t really maximise, it’s more like “fit window for currently visible content”. Therefore different behaviour in different apps.

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Christine Satchell

I want to know why they have hidden my mobile sync files where old iPhone back ups can be found. I used to be able to go library – application support – mobile sync, but now they have hidden the entire library. The only way to find it is finder – go – then hold down the alt key and the hidden library – application support – mobile sync treasure trove will appear.

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Anestis

Ever since Mac OS 8 and 9 (when I started using Mac OS), the close button on the Windows has only closed the Windows, and this has been carried over to Mac OS X.

Command-Q has always been to quit the application.

I actually prefer this method of working. How many times have I closed notepad on Windows, or IE, or Chrome, or some other application by closing the last Window, then realising I need a new window. Og\h crap, I need to restart the application!

I want to quit the application when _I_ want to quit it, not when the OS thinks I should quit it.

muotechguy

I think theres a distinct difference with apps that use a document model and apps that only have one window interface. Obviously, Word for instance has a single window with many documents. Closing a document doesnt close the application. For something like Mail though – which only has ONE window – why does it remain running when I close that main window? What possible reason would I have for closing the window if I didn’t want the app to close?

Omar

Actually, Mail doesn’t have just one window. Let’s say you want to send a message but you don’t want to open up your inbox. Right-mouse click on the mail icon and hit “compose new message”. Voila, a window opened without the Inbox window.

I now use Sparrow, but I used to use Mail and whenever I did, I would use Alfred to send a message to an individual by typing ‘email NameOfPerson’. Then a composition window would open up and I would quickly type out my email and hit send.

Today, I leave Sparrow open in full screen and open up a composition window to use on the primary desktop screen.

James Bruce

Mail has one main window – the rest I would call pop-ups. It isn’t a document model application though.

I see what you mean about just bringing up a composition window though; you can still have the main window closed.

Maybe youre right; all I know is that it leaves me with hundreds of open applications, and after 4 years of switching to Apple it still happens to me. I don’t think I’m so ‘stuck in my windows ways’ that I can’t change though; I think the concept is just flawed. It’s easy for you to defend that if it’s always been that way for you though. I suspect I’m not the only one who still finds it frustrating after a long time using macs though.

Omar

Actually, it hasn’t always been that way for me. I started using computers when I was about 6 or 7 on DOS and followed Windows all the way up until the first four or five years of Windows XP.

I switched to a Mac in 2005 and got over the window-centric paradigm pretty quickly. I have heard of others having trouble with it though, so I’m not surprised to see it among a list of annoyances.

To me, the application-centric model of OSX makes more sense. The window is not the application, it’s a subset of the application. An application can have many windows. Whether you call it a ‘pop-up’ or not, it doesn’t matter: it’s still part of that application.

From a hierarchal perspective, we go from Operating System, to Application, to Window.

After all, an application need not have a window to be considered an application, but a window is always part of an application.

I typically work with many windows open and it’s very convenient to be able to cycle between all windows within a given application by simply clicking “cmd + ~”. I’m not forced to cycle through entirely different applications as I am with “alt+tab”.

OSX is extremely efficient at managing open applications and you don’t really have to worry about an open one slowing down your computer unless you’re running Chrome, for example, and a plugin’s run amok.

I’m a major user of keyboard shortcuts, and for me when I want to quit an application I just hit cmd+q. When I want to quit a window, cmd+w.

Shortcuts make life wonderful, don’t they? =)

Habib Alamin

“Whether you call it a ‘pop-up’ or not, it doesn’t matter: it’s still part of that application.” – this.

“After all, an application need not have a window to be considered an application, but a window is always part of an application.” – and this.

“I’m a major user of keyboard shortcuts, and for me when I want to quit an application I just hit cmd+q. When I want to quit a window, cmd+w.
Shortcuts make life wonderful, don’t they? =)” – and THIS!

These points should be bolded, I think.

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AH

As others have pointed out you have the use of the “traffic light” buttons completely wrong. The green button is “Zoom” and is intended to make the window just big enough to show its contents. But some applications (such as Garageband) are felt to be better with as much space as possible, so it makes them take up the whole screen. Granted it’s not perfect, but it’s not nearly as bad as you make it out.

If you’re complaining about Luanchpad you’re obviously on Lion and should be using full screen mode when you want an app to take up the whole screen.

And while you may want a program to quit when you close the last window (which some programs do; that’s an inconsistency…) I don’t. I like being able to run iTunes without any windows. I like being able to keep a program that takes a while to start up, like Word or Photoshop, running without any windows. It would upset me if they made it behave Windows style, the way you would like. Sometimes I’m done with something–for now. I don’t want to put it away, I just want to put it to the side.

I agree that the vertical buttons were/are stupid. (If only because it’s an inconsistency.)

For Launchpad there is a simple solution, don’t use it. It’s not like anyone’s forcing it on you. There are many ways to launch apps, use your favorite! I keep commonly used stuff on the dock and launch almost everything else with Spotlight.

muotechguy

That’s an interesting point about full-screen mode, but I think theres a difference between working full-screen and maximising a window.

Certainly, launchpad isnt forced, but it does have an annoying tendency to pop up when I download something from the app store – it’s not like I can disable it, even if I can ignore it on a daily basis.

AH

There is a difference between maximized and full-screen, but they’re still very similar. Keep in mind that the Mac is built on the concept of multiple windows, full-screen is basically the opposite of that. Hence a “zoom” button. (You write “Zoom implies everything gets larger…” that’s wrong, think of “zoom lens” which goes both ways, not “zoom in”.)

I’m actually not on Lion, but on SL every item from the App Store gets added to the dock. I don’t why, I just remove it and move on.

Habib Alamin

I’m sure there’s a Unix defaults command you can find online to disable Launchpad.

Habib Alamin

“I like being able to run iTunes without any windows.” – same here. I hate it when apps just have a window floating around doing nothing. Although iTunes’ mini player kind of solves this, I still like to close it and use the keys on my keyboard.

“which some programs do; that’s an inconsistency” – the programs that do usually can only have one window open, e.g. System Preferences, if you closed the window, what did you want to open that you expect the app to stay open?

“Sometimes I’m done with something–for now. I don’t want to put it away, I just want to put it to the side.” – this is so true. I usually have apps running in the dock with no windows all the time, even though I use an SSD.

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AH

You know what’s a really annoying interface element on OS X, the skeuomorphic crap!

muotechguy

That was point number 5, but I had to cut it for brevity. Totally agree.

AH

It could have easily been instead of item 3 “Non-Standard Button Positions” that was fixed. The skeuomorphism seems to be spreading!

Su

It’s a matter of preference. It’s better than dull interface on Windows.

Habib Alamin

Maybe I’m just easily entertained, but I don’t know why everyone’s so up in arms about this. I love it.

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david

I really hate the ctrl-click for the right mouse button, I use that button on my mouse a lot.

Anestis

You can use other USB mice with two buttons on a Mac. And the new Apple mice you can set their behavior up so you have right click.

Same with the trackpads on the Mac laptops. Very configurable.

All this nonsense people bring up about not being to right-click on a Mac has been nonsense for over 10 years at least.

On Mac OS 9 I was using a Logitech trackball, It had four buttons, and I could configure each button to do what I wanted with the Logitech drivers.

*gas shock horror*.

Rich

The default is that right click works – you perhaps need to tick the box in Mouse settings.

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Doc

How about this one: Even if you’ve sized an app to a tiny blob at the bottom of the screen, the menu bar is still at the very *top* of the screen, unlike Gnome 2 and Windows, that keep the menu bar *as part of the app* (Gnome 3 does this, too, thanks to some OS X fanboys that thought copying is cool.)

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Scutterman

Close buttons that don’t close aren’t just an apple thing. Increasingly this is happening on Windows as well (Skype, MSN, spottify…). I much prefer programs that give me the option to “Hide when minimised”, rather than assuming I want it to “Hide when closed”.

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Chris Hoffman

I’m surprised to see no references to Apple’s obsession with skeuomorphism. I’m no Apple user, but I saw a screenshot of the Find My Friends app and it looks positively shocking — do we _really_ need fake leather stitching in our GUIs?

I much prefer Android’s (with the holo theme) and even Microsoft’s attempts at embracing an actual digital UI instead of pretending windows are made of leather and must be stitched up properly, lest they come apart or something.

But what do I know, I’m no UI designer.

muotechguy

I kind of agree, but it doesn’t get on my nerves so much as broken digital interfaces. Then again, I think it also makes a lot of the apps more accessible to new users – an address book that actually looks like an address book is far more attractive to those new to computers than something that’s ineherently “computer like”. I guess I’m in two minds about that one. In some apps though, it’s certainly unnecessary – like find my friends. Theres no actual reason for it there. Address books… maybe.

Chris Hoffman

I find it interesting when compared to their hardware. Apple hardware is beautiful and looks futuristic — it’s as minimal as possible. All the extraneous elements have been discarded.

And then you turn it on and there’s fake paper and stitched leather and similar things on the screen.

I wonder — is this on purpose? Or is there just a disconnect between the software and hardware developers at Apple? Jonathan Ive gave an interview recently — when asked about the fake stitched leather, he just winced and said the software wasn’t his job without trying to defend or explain it.

Dave Parrack

I just had to Google ‘Skeuomorphism’. That is my only contribution to this debate.

Chris Hoffman

I may look smart, but I just saw the word for the first time a few weeks ago. Shhh, don’t tell anyone.

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Shehan Nirmal

Is Mac so great…???

muotechguy

Yes.

Dave Parrack

No.

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sebredd

I have to agree with you – those 3 buttons are quite random. To improve the situation, I would say put four buttons up there, rather than the three. Add a button that closes the application, rather than just closing the window. But I don’t think Apple would listen to me, it’s just a suggestion.

My bigger gripe is with the size of the buttons – they’re tiny! I didn’t take the mouse sniper class at school! Yes, I’m also not very good at FPS games :(

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Luke

I think the “Quit” button is another one of the various features designed by Steve Jobs and in his own image.
Just like Jobs, Mac applications will continue to run unless you either deliberately make them quit, or they die…
[Too soon?]

James Bruce

I lol’led. ;)

James Bruce

second

James Bruce

test

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Susendeep Dutta

Reading this article confirms my thinking that one needs to learn lawbook (restrictions) of Apple to do things in their ecosystem.

Other persons also didn’t liked some of the annoyances of OSX.

Prediction: Everyone Will Ditch Lion when OS X 10.8 Comes Out –

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Prediction-Everyone-Will-Ditch-Lion-when-OS-X-10-8-Comes-Out-273959.shtml

James Bruce

Lion is the best version of OSX yet, so I completely disagree with that premise. The interface elements I’ve argued against here and by and large aimed at every version os OSX to date. Sure, everyone will ditch Lion and upgrade to Mountain Lion, but not because Lion sucks: there are great advances coming in 10.8, and people naturally want to update. I imagine it will be the polar opposite of Windows 8: where no one wants to update, and some OEMs will even start offering a downgrade service!

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themainliner

Great article, I can’t remember the last time I read an intelligent critique of the MacOS. All you normally get is fanboys or bore Mac=crap trolls.

I couldn’t agree more about the Wall of Useless Icon. My experience is from Gnome3/Unity. It’s a regression that designers have simply failed to grasp. “OK we need a way of accessing all the apps we don’t have quick access to. We need them as well.” “I know what about some key combo to pop up a dashboard or ‘HUD’ with access to everything!” The next step has to be: “How can we tidy up this productivity fail and make it more streamlined.” “I know how about categories of applications and a mechanism for reducing the amount of screen space these categories take up.” “I know what about a new and funky set of drop down menu’s and sub-menu.” and finally we’re back to where we started from.

James Bruce

Exactly. I see us using a remarkable new command line as the next big thing!

themainliner

I use Linux (Mint 11 Katya) so I already do. :D

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Everett Vinzant

Thank you, thank you, thank you. I *HATE* the wall of icons design. I *LOVE* using LaunchBar (or spotlight, or whatever you want to use). I type in the first couple letters of the app I want, and BAM it loads. SO MUCH FASTER than paging through walls of icons. In fact, if I could link Siri to LaunchBar, that would be the fastest OS navigation in existence. WTF is up with icon walls? WHY? I intentionally leave my desktop… blank.
Also, I despise docks, in all their forms. There is nothing OS X’s dock gives me that I can’t do with LaunchBar. I have searched in vain for a way to disable the dock. It is a useless vestige. I do my navigation with my keyboard. I use a mouse (that slows me down by making me take a hand off the keyboard) when I HAVE to. If I could do keyboard/voice input, that would be incredibly quick.

Su

On Launchpad.

Sure, you are right. For those who like to stick with keyboards, using LaunchBar or spotlight is better solutions and they are faster to open apps and documents. But everybody is not in hurry like you. And what you people are forgetting or not realizing is users are not only geeks.
Most users are not geeks and professionals. Those people are actually very small percentage. Think about business standpoint. Geeks are not their main target.
The GUl isn’t made for you. Mac is for the rest of people.
This is more like for average users or creative users who seeks a way to launch apps more smoothly without using a keyboard or typing of sorts
I like to use Launchpad by using trackpad gestures. Using the gestures is the best feature of Lion. You can change all windows, dashboard, go to desktop, sleep Mac, and launch apps without touching the keyboard(Launchpad), If you really want to stick with a keyboard, go ahead. Since Terminal can be opened in fullscreen mode in Lion, you now can move between GUI and CUI seamlessly.

On Close Buttons.

Well, as others mentioned, it’s not Windows. Cmd + Q is the way in Mac. Get over it. Like others said, I don’t want to close apps, either, but windows. If Close Buttons were to close apps like on Windows, every time I close windows, I have to launch apps. Ridiculous.

The Green Maximise Button

Who said the green button is always maximize button? Yeah, it’s norm in Windows, but not in Mac. Once you set the size of the window, Mac will remember and don’t really need to resize it so when I hit the Green Button in iTunes, it’s either max window or Mini Player. Now that there is fullscreen mode, so I don’t even need to hit the button.

Every time I see article like this, it annoys me.
They blame Apple as if they were the only users.
Of course, they are not perfect.
But since you are not their main target users, they won’t always please you.

Everett Vinzant

This has nothing to do with being in a hurry. It has everything to do with economy, and user experience. Every time I have to take my hands off the keyboard to grab the mouse, I’m less efficient. I’m then reminded that the User Interface is less efficient. Also, I didn’t say anything about CSU/command line. LaunchBar is not a command line. If I drop to the command line and put in =144/12 and hit enter, I do not get the answer like I do in LaunchBar.

LaunchPad is designed for a touch screen interface, not a mouse.

Last, LaunchBar takes LESS skill to use that LaunchPad does. Someone who ISN’T technical has to know to launch LaunchPad, then they have to know to use two finger swiping to change pages (instead of three finger swiping which MOST non techy’s are going to be used to). To run LaunchBar, I press a button combination, and type in what I want (Word or Excel or Pages, or Aperture) by name. How is this more technical than hunting through a poorly designed GUI? Answer: it’s not. And as you get used to using LaunchBar it becomes more powerful/useful/more efficient. That doesn’t happen with LaunchPad.

No, LaunchPad is NOT a good UI for its main users. It is inefficient, more complicated and doesn’t use standard conventions. LaunchPad has NOTHING to do with targeting the main user with what they need. It has everything with integrating iOS with OS X, which is what Apple wants.

Su

Sure, it does. Why are you trying to be efficient? Isn’t it to save time? But not everyone needs to be that efficient. Are you asking your mom to be that efficient? I understand that in your case using LaunchBar seems the best solution because I assume things you do on your Mac are keyboard-intenstive tasks. But when I do mouse-intenstive tasks, I don’t want to take my hands off my mouse or trackpad. I then feel like using keyboard is less efficient.

Sure, it’s not command line. It’s an app launcher.
You can do the same thing with Spotlight to open apps.

That’s right. Launchpad is for touch-screen interface, not for mouse so I don’t use a mouse anymore. An idea of typing comes from CUI and is old-fashioned.

The problem of this sort of application launchers is ubiquity. You have to install the app whereas Launchpad and Spotlight is pre-installed. What’s worse. LaunchBar isn’t free. If you leave your Mac, that’s it. You won’t be as efficient as you are on your Mac. And I don’t want to learn tons of features and new keyboard shortcuts that only works when you use those apps. Once you remember Mac OS’s shortcuts, they works ubiquitously throughout almost all Mac OS X Macs. Sure, some recent new features like Spotlight and Launchpad are only available new Macs, but it’s a matter of time.

I’d rather master new global shortcuts than using the app launchers.

You think LaunchBar takes less skills? Have you ever tried teaching your mom or non-techy friends how to use it?

Right. Just typing the name of apps is easy, but to do this, you need to install the app, buy it, which I believe most non-techy friends don’t want to and don’t have to, and explain how things work and get used to.

In LaunchPad, the app usually sits in non-techy friends dock.One click opens up LaunchPad and with two-finger gesture, you can find an app right way. Unlike techies, they don’t have tons of apps that becomes uncontrollable wall of icons so they have no problem with finding apps.
And If they use the apps very often, then the apps should be registered in the dock.
If you want them to experience the power of gesture.
You can just teach 4-finger gesture, which you can learn very quickly. There’s even a tutorial video in Trackpad panel in System Preference.

If you are not using the gestures, you are missing out one of the best user experiences in Mac OS X.

I just need to teach them 2 things whereas LaunchBar requires a lot more explanations and time to get used to.
They don’t need to be as efficient as you are.

Yes, it is the feature for the main users.
Like you said, it’s aiming to integrate iOS and OS X, which is what Apple wants.
Do you think there is no reason for that?
Sure, there is.
The reason is more and more people are buying Mac because they like the user experience in iPhone and iPad so Apple wants them to experience the same sleek user experience in Mac as well. That is why they are bringing iOS experience to OS X.

Therefore, LaunchPad is for main users.

LaunchBar is a great tool for power users who need hi-efficiency and that’s cool!

Everett Vinzant

Uhm, no. “Sure, it does. Why are you trying to be efficient? Isn’t it to save time?” How about not WASTING time. You only have 24 hours in a day. Being efficient is NOT about being in a hurry, it’s about being able to spend time other places (the minutes I do not waste are better spent elsewhere). So NO, this has nothing to do with being in a hurry.

“You think LaunchBar takes less skills? Have you ever tried teaching your mom or non-techy friends how to use it?”

Yes, I have. And over the phone. Have you ever tried to have someone find a graphic in a pile of graphics while you are helping them on the phone troubleshoot their computer? How easy is it to say,” press command space and type word,” v.s. “okay now look for a graphic that says Word under it. It should be there… Nope that doesn’t sound like it was it…” My way doesn’t rely on them doing a where’s Waldo. My non-techy mother (mid sixties) prefers LaunchBar for this and other reasons.

“That’s right. Launchpad is for touch-screen interface, not for mouse so I don’t use a mouse anymore. An idea of typing comes from CUI and is old-fashioned.”

What mac comes with a touch screen so that you can type a document, a spread sheet, make changes in a password list in a database, rewrite code, etc. None, I know of. What you’re talking about is an iPad. I’ve used them to write a one page doc. I would go crazy trying to write a 20 page dissertation on them. And before you give me that, “you’re obviously not the demographic,” crap, education is one of Apples largest demographics. And don’t even try, “verbal dictation a.k.a Siri…” Try to use voice dictation on a manufacturing floor, or while a radio is playing, or while my wife is talking with me. No, keyboards still exist, and will exist, for a while yet. Someday we will have computers that can sort out who they are listening too, and do it well. Until then, keyboards exist for a reason.

Gestures is a straw man in this argument. I’m arguing against LaunchPad. If you want I can argue against gestures as well. There is nothing a gesture can do that LaunchBar can’t do, or do faster (that I’m aware of). Why would I memorize lots of clunky interface when I can do everything a gesture can do, and everything LaunchPad can do, faster, and more intuitively in LaunchBar? Gesture example: a three finger swipe moves me among my running full screen apps, a two finger swipe moves me among pages of LaunchPad. Every person I show that to asks me why it’s different (3 finger v.s. 2 finger), i.e. not what they expect or not intuitive.

No, saying that LaunchBar is for power users because it is more efficient and more intuitive, is silly. LaunchBar really demonstrates the power of how it should be done. And when they migrate from a keyboard, you can easily have spoken commands entered in to LaunchBar. Your interface doesn’t change. LaunchPad is Win3.1 for OS X. I’m sorry to be harsh, but that is reality.

James Bruce

I also still havent really made use of gestures. It’s very hard to add something like that to a well established computer use/methodology. They should add some more guided usage, perhaps, to get people used to them more quickly.

Su

“Uhm, no. “Sure, it does. Why are you trying to be efficient? Isn’t it to save time?” How about not WASTING time. You only have 24 hours in a day. Being efficient is NOT about being in a hurry, it’s about being able to spend time other places (the minutes I do not waste are better spent elsewhere). So NO, this has nothing to do with being in a hurry.”

Glad to hear that you are not in a hurry. I totally agree with not to waste time. I just felt sense of hurry and lack of time from your expression such as “so much faster”. In my opinion, being efficient means achieving maximum productivity with minimum wasted effort or expense so I choose not to spend my time and money for LaunchBar unless my task is really keyboard-intensitve. Everybody doesn’t have keyboard-intensitve tasks so they will be more efficient by learning ubiquitous basic functions of Mac not using LaunchBar because it will be minimum wasted effort and expense. Basic functions: fewer things to learn and free. LaunchPad: tons of features, which is good power users, but $35 is too expensive for just launching apps or documents.

“Have you ever tried to have someone find a graphic in a pile of graphics while you are helping them on the phone troubleshoot their computer?
How easy is it to say,” press command space and type word,” v.s. “okay now look for a graphic that says Word under it. It should be there… Nope that doesn’t sound like it was it…” My way doesn’t rely on them doing a where’s Waldo. My non-techy mother (mid sixties) prefers LaunchBar for this and other reasons.”

Sure, I have. I used to be a customer rep. I even did via email.
I agree. When a person don’t even know what “click” means or how to use a mouse or when you don’t know what they are looking at, it’s better to tell them to hit the keyboard in order to achieve what they want quickly. I’ve done it with my mom as well.
In this way, it’s convenient for people who solve their problems. You can solve the problems very quickly and won’t waste your time. But this is not good for them. They are not learning anything. A problem will happen gain soon or later and then you have to take your time again.
It’s so much better to teach them the basics of how to use Mac than troubleshoot problems every time they occurs.
By doing so, you can minimize problems and don’t have to teach them all the time. Also, they will gain confidence of using Mac and learn by themselves. There are plenty of video tutorials available: http://www.apple.com/findouthow/mac/

In your mom’s case, you can minimize the numbers of apps in her docs and also by using Parental Control, you can restrict things she can do on Mac so that she won’t be overwhelmed by many options. If she doesn’t know how to click and open apps or files, then you should teach her in the first place. If a problem is more complicated, then you can use a screen sharing, which you can see your mom’s screen and remotely troubleshoot her problem. You no longer need to be frustrated by troubleshooting your mom via phone. You just need to set up her Mac or teach her how to use it once. This is how I teach my mom(mid sixties) and troubleshoot her problem. Since I taught her basic, there’s been no more troubleshooting for a long time.

“What mac comes with a touch screen so that you can type a document, a spread sheet, make changes in a password list in a database, rewrite code, etc. None, I know of. What you’re talking about is an iPad. I’ve used them to write a one page doc. I would go crazy trying to write a 20 page dissertation on them. And before you give me that, “you’re obviously not the demographic,” crap, education is one of Apples largest demographics. And don’t even try, “verbal dictation a.k.a Siri…” Try to use voice dictation on a manufacturing floor, or while a radio is playing, or while my wife is talking with me. No, keyboards still exist, and will exist, for a while yet. Someday we will have computers that can sort out who they are listening too, and do it well. Until then, keyboards exist for a reason.”

Well, this is what you said. “LaunchPad is designed for a touch screen interface, not a mouse”
All recent MacBooks and Pros come with a touchscreen. A trackpad is a touchscreen(also called multi-touch) so I thought you meant that. With a trackpad, you can’t do things you described, but there are some things you can do with a trackpad by gesture. It’s not only for iPad. Apparently, you were not used to typing on a touchscreen. It’s a matter of how much you used to typing on a touchscreen. It happened when people start using keyboard and a mouse. You can see a lot of people who can type really fast on iPad: http://youtu.be/cSMRfHbW3B8.
Obviously, you were so used to using keyboard so a touchscreen keyboard isn’t for you. The task such as writing a keyboard-intensitve task, but it’s easy to do that on iPad when you get to used to it. If you don’t want to do it, there are options like using a bluetooth keyboard with iPad so that you don’t have to use a touchscreen keyboard when you write a lot of documents. Siri is still half-baked, but is going improve soon or later and take over the UI sphere. Like a mouse did.I agree, keyboards will continue to exist, but less and less people will use it as people are get used to other UIs. You know, people don’t like changes. There are always people don’t want to adopt changes.

“Gestures is a straw man in this argument. I’m arguing against LaunchPad. If you want I can argue against gestures as well. There is nothing a gesture can do that LaunchBar can’t do, or do faster (that I’m aware of). Why would I memorize lots of clunky interface when I can do everything a gesture can do, and everything LaunchPad can do, faster, and more intuitively in LaunchBar? Gesture example: a three finger swipe moves me among my running full screen apps, a two finger swipe moves me among pages of LaunchPad. Every person I show that to asks me why it’s different (3 finger v.s. 2 finger), i.e. not what they expect or not intuitive.”

Sure, there are things you can’t do or do faster with LaunchBar. I can put it if you want to. Again, LaunchBar is good for a keyboard-intensive-task workers. If you use a mouse or a trackpad a lot, then using gestures and Expose is so much faster and intuitive rather than leaving my hand off my trackpad or my mouse like the same reason you don’t want to leave your keyboard. I don’t get what your people asked you. And I don’t what kind of people you meet, but probably you couldn’t provide good reasons since you are not using it and don’t get the concept of it.

You know, people like you are right in some ways and often those people believe their experiences and reality is other people’s reality, but they are not.
People don’t like changes. So when there is a new thing comes up, they always see it from their old point of view and resist it. When a computer and a keyboard came out, they resist it like saying paper and a pen are so much better. Still, it is in some cases. Over time people are get used to using keyboards and so many people use it now. It happened with a mouse. The same thing is happening with a touchscreen. I won’t blame you sticking with a keyboard. It’s cool. It has a lot of merits. I use it everyday. But soon or later a touchscreen will take over and voice UI in the future.

Apparently, you are not looking at other realities.
The reason why more and more people start to use touchscreen devices and iPad gained its popularity is there was no device like iPad that you can use without learning a lot and even small children can use immediately.

As I mentioned before, Apple is bringing this experience to Mac for new users and experienced users who are to seek elegant, intuitive and efficient user experience not like a old-fashioned, geeky and techy way.
LaunchPad is a part of this move.

Blaming the feature that you can’t make use of it is ridiculous.
It is good for the rest of the people. Before complaining, try to make use of it like this site’s name. If you can’t, see it from a different point of view and think the reason of existence. Maybe, LaunchBar will remain, but it’s won’t be a new feature Apple will introduce in the future.

Sorry to be harsh, but this is another reality.

Everett Vinzant

First:

“In my opinion, being efficient means achieving maximum productivity with minimum wasted effort or expense so I choose not to spend my time and money for LaunchBar unless my task is really keyboard-intensitve.”

My time is worth $1 to $3 per MINUTE. That means I can pay for LaunchBar if I save 60 minutes (or 20 at the higher rate). Over the LIFE OF OWNING THE PRODUCT. I’m willing to bet you would save enough time using LaunchBar it would pay for itself.

Next:

I used my Mom as a single case. The point stands about people not liking to do a “Where’s Waldo” to find that one app they are after among ALL the apps they have. AND you are proving my point. I’m having to go in and reconfigure the interface, or do the troubleshooting myself remotely using Remote Desktop. What we are agreeing on here is that the interface doesn’t always work. I solved the problem with LaunchBar. AND, you were not able to counter what I said about how simple it was to use.

Next:

“All recent MacBooks and Pros come with a touchscreen.”
Please provide a link. I went in to an Apple store and asked for a MacBook or MacBook Pro with a touch screen, and they had NO IDEA what you are talking about because they don’t exist. There is an aftermarket company that will charge you $3000 to make your MacBook work with a stylus (not really a touch screen though).
You are wrong there.

Next:
“Sure, there are things you can’t do or do faster with LaunchBar.”
Your list is missing. I don’t see it anywhere in your response. I can only assume you are mistaken here as well.

Next:

“You know, people like you are right in some ways and often those people believe their experiences and reality is other people’s reality, but they are not.”

I did not know we were going to be using a Tardis or Lewis Carrols looking glass in this argument. There is only one reality I am aware of, and we all participate in it. I’m not going to go into philosophy here. I’m staying empirical, and I hope you will too.

“Blaming the feature that you can’t make use of it is ridiculous.” I in no way did that. I pointed out flaws in design. I can make all kinds of excuses for something to exist, but bad design, is quite simply bad design.

To finish this. You CAN NOT type a document efficiently without the keyboard. You CAN NOT use Safari efficiently without the keyboard. MOST input is going to be keyboard based. SOME is going to be trackpad/mouse based. I can move MOST to the keyboard and not have to use the trackpad/mouse, not wasting time, and making me more efficient. For people that do not need a keyboard, there is an iPad. For people that need a keyboard, LaunchBar (and similar programs) are more efficient. Period.

Su

1. “My time is worth $1 to $3 per MINUTE. That means I can pay for LaunchBar if I save 60 minutes (or 20 at the higher rate). Over the LIFE OF OWNING THE PRODUCT. I’m willing to bet you would save enough time using LaunchBar it would pay for itself.

Good for you. I’m glad to hear that you can save time and earn more by LaunchBar. I’d hire someone like you and have you do some time-consuming tasks that is very keyboard-intensive so that I can be very efficient.

2. “I used my Mom as a single case. The point stands about people not liking to do a “Where’s Waldo” to find that one app they are after among ALL the apps they have. AND you are proving my point. I’m having to go in and reconfigure the interface, or do the troubleshooting myself remotely using Remote Desktop. What we are agreeing on here is that the interface doesn’t always work. I solved the problem with LaunchBar. AND, you were not able to counter what I said about how simple it was to use.”

Yes, it’s a single case. In this specific case, to solve your or my mom’s problem as quickly as possible, having her use a keyboard is the best way, but what you are doing and I was doing before were navigating her what she wants to do by using LaunchBar. I assume she is not actually using LaunchBar besides launching apps or documents. It’s like 2/1000 of LaunchBar’s features. Troubleshooting remotely is cool if a problem is difficult to solve by themselves. But it won’t solve the problem fundamentally. It will happen again. What I’m suggesting is to educate her how to use it. By restricting functions using Parental Control, she will no way make mistakes or be confused. Tons of options make people overwhelmed and confused especially non-techy ones. This is what I learned from my customer rep experience.
Apple understands this and was very successful iPod, iPhone, iPad because they restricted options so that anyone can use and master how to use it. Even small children. Do you know many non-techy people don’t even know how to get app folder? So LaunchPad is very good solutions to solve this problem. Hitting the LaunchPad icon in the dock, you find apps like iPhone or iPad.

What you are doing is like micromanaging someone because you don’t believe they can learn. If you properly educate someone and believe them they can, they will learn and start to learn by themselves. Is it better that she can use Mac by herself? So that we can save our time and spend time more important things with her.

3.”All recent MacBooks and Pros come with a touchscreen.”
Please provide a link. I went in to an Apple store and asked for a MacBook or MacBook Pro with a touch screen, and they had NO IDEA what you are talking about because they don’t exist. There is an aftermarket company that will charge you $3000 to make your MacBook work with a stylus (not really a touch screen though).You are wrong there.”

Again. I said this “All recent MacBooks and Pros come with a touchscreen.” because of your post “LaunchPad is designed for a touch screen interface, not a mouse.”
In strict sense, trackpad is multi-touch:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multi-touch. You used the word “interface” and I mentioned using LaunchPad with a trackpad so I thought you meant that and used it in a sense of sensing surface. Obviously, you didn’t mean that. My bad.

4.“Sure, there are things you can’t do or do faster with LaunchBar.”
“Your list is missing. I don’t see it anywhere in your response. I can only assume you are mistaken here as well.”

Ok, you want me to list them.

First of all, LaunchBar can’t be used with mouse or trackpad-intensitve tasks are mostly creative tasks such as drawing, editing audio wave form or musical notes, creating a mind map and so on. Obviously, keyboards aren’t made to do these creative and subtle tasks. If you have to leave my hand off my trackpad or mouse and change to a keyboard, then it slows down my workflow.

In addition to that,

1. You can’t visually select windows.
2. You can’t eject a specific volume.
3. You can’t force quit apps while it’s opening. Especially when you accidentally open apps.
4. You can’t scroll intuitively.
5. You can’t rotate pictures intuitively. Not just rotating L/R or 180.
6. You can’t zoom intuitively.
7. You can’t move the location of widgets intuitively in Dashboard.
8. You can’t go back and forth web pages intuitively like turning pages in a book. You can see a half of the previous page and still can go back to the current page unlike the keyboard shortcut or web history search.
9. You can’t look up a word and get a summary, look up in Thesaurus, Wikipedia, foreign dictionaries like Japanese or Japanese-Engish without opening Dictionary app. These is a very important function for me when I’m writing or reading something. You can do it with a keyboard shortcut but with a gesture, it’s just double-tap a word with three fingers.

Using Gestures and Expose actually improves my productivity because without leaving my mouse or trackpad, that used to only be able to do with a keyboard.

So in no way LaunchBar can’t do those tasks or even faster.

What made you said that “There is nothing a gesture can do that LaunchBar can’t do, or do faster (that I’m aware of)”?

You don’t know anything about gestures’ useful features.

You know what, those features work in all of recent Macs. My favorite dictionary feature works in virtually any apps.

5. “Blaming the feature that you can’t make use of it is ridiculous.” I in no way did that. I pointed out flaws in design. I can make all kinds of excuses for something to exist, but bad design, is quite simply bad design.

Well, sir. By agreeing with the author’s point, you are blaming LaunchPad, I believe. Obviously, you are not using it and make use of it. LIke I said, LaunchPad isn’t for you. There is no such a thing that a feature works everybody. A point this article’s author is pointing is not a flaw. Simply, it’s not his liking or he has too many apps. Your points so-called flaws are not flaws, either. There are users who use it perfectly fine and efficiently. LaunchPad wasn’t designed for you. Other features, either. I don’t know why you don’t get it.

To finish this. You CAN NOT type a document efficiently without the keyboard.

Well, you can’t type without a keyboard whether it’s efficient or not.

You CAN NOT use Safari efficiently without the
keyboard.

Sure, you can if your task is just browsing. It’s depending on a type of tasks.

MOST input is going to be keyboard based. SOME is going to be trackpad/mouse based. I can move MOST to the keyboard and not have to use the trackpad/mouse, not wasting time, and making me more efficient. For people that do not need a keyboard, there is an iPad. For people that need a keyboard, LaunchBar (and similar programs) are more efficient. Period.

I’m happy for you that you are not wasting your time and being more efficient. If everybody falls in either people who needs a keyboard and don’t need one, that would be nice.
But I think most people need both unlike you. I’m one of them. If iPad became powerful and good enough to do creative and subtle tasks, then I move to iPad. Many people are already making a move though.

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Truefire_

This is exactly how I feel! If it’s not touchscreen, why the icon grid/wall?

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Andrea

Great article! I am new to Mac, but these are things I have noticed straight away and agree on each single word.

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Tom

I like most of this article, aside from the flat-out hatred of the Launchpad and dock. The whole purpose of the “DOCK”, is to host all of your most used apps, and minimized windows, and everything else should be in your applications folder. I don’t understand the need to index everything, but then again, not my system.

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Steve

I’m with you, James. In an application designed to do everything in a window, what are we supposed to do without a window open? Sure, we can use File-new or file-open, but how often do I close my last window and immediately want to open a new one? Maybe a childhood with Windows gave me habits too inelegant for Macs, but I usually want to open a bunch of windows, use them all at the same time, then close them all at the same time.

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Francisco de Gusmão

I study interface design and the problems you showed here break some essential rules. The red and green buttons are some serious issues that they should already have taken care of…

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