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How many times have you forgotten a password in the last year? Losing a website password isn’t a huge deal because you can reset them with your email address. But forgetting your computer password is scarier because they’re hard to reset.

If you’ve lost track of the password for a Windows administrator account, don’t fear. There are several methods you can use to recover the account. These can bail you out of a bad situation, but don’t forget that a password manager can keep you from lockouts 7 Clever Password Manager Superpowers You Have to Start Using 7 Clever Password Manager Superpowers You Have to Start Using Password managers carry a lot of great features, but did you know about these? Here are seven aspects of a password manager you should take advantage of. Read More altogether.

1. Use the Lock Screen Workaround

Assuming you don’t use a Microsoft account to log into Windows How to Delete Your Microsoft Account & Create a Local Windows 10 Login How to Delete Your Microsoft Account & Create a Local Windows 10 Login When you access Windows 10 with a Microsoft Account, you can store data in the cloud and sync it across devices. Does this sound concerning? We show you how to switch to a local account. Read More , you’ll have to reset the local password. If the locked account is the only administrator account on the PC, you need to first enable the hidden admin account How to Unlock the Secret Administrator Account in Windows How to Unlock the Secret Administrator Account in Windows Administration rights are now handled by User Account Control in Windows, but the hidden Administrator account is powerful. Here's how to enable it. Read More to use this workaround.

We’ve covered this method in detail in our complete guide to resetting Windows 10 passwords How to Reset Your Lost Windows 10 Password How to Reset Your Lost Windows 10 Password You forgot your Windows 10 login password? Don't despair! We'll show you how to reset your password and recover your account. Read More . We’ll summarize it here, but please see that article for more details.

Boot From Installation Media

If you don’t have one already, create Windows 10 installation media on a flash drive How to Create Windows 10 Installation Media How to Create Windows 10 Installation Media Regardless of how you arrived at Windows 10, there's a way to create your own installation media. Sooner or later you might need it. Let us show you how to be prepared. Read More using another machine if necessary. Insert that drive into your machine, and watch for a prompt to press F12, Delete, or another key to choose your boot device. Boot from the flash drive, and wait until you see the first Windows 10 setup screen. Press Shift + F10 here and you’ll open a Command Prompt.

Your Windows installation is probably on your C: drive, so if you try the below command and it doesn’t work, type cd D: or another drive if yours is different. Type this command to browse to the System32 folder:

cd Windows\System32

Add Command Prompt to Windows Lock Screen

Now, you can use a trick to change one of the elements on the Windows lock screen. The Ease of Access menu collects accessibility options like the on-screen keyboard and dictation for users with disabilities. Using text commands, you can replace this icon with a shortcut to the Command Prompt. Enter these two lines one at a time to back up the shortcut and replace it:

ren utilman.exe utilman.exe.bak

ren cmd.exe utilman.exe

That’s it for now, so type this command to reboot as normal:

wpeutil reboot

Back at the normal sign-in screen, click the Ease of Access shortcut in the bottom-right to open a Command Prompt.

Type this command to enable the Admin account:

net user Administrator /active:yes

Now you need to reboot again. Use this command as a shortcut:

shutdown -t 0 -r

Reset the Password

After the restart, click the Administrator account name in the bottom left. There’s no password on this, so you’ll jump right to the desktop. You need to open a Command Prompt one more time to reset the password. Right-click the Start Button and click Command Prompt (Admin), then type this command to see all the users on your PC:

net userl

Your username should be obvious. Now, replace USERNAME in this command with yours, and Windows will let you set a new password:

net user USERNAME *

Set a password, log off, and your account is now accessible. Once you’ve confirmed that you can log in, boot back into the Windows 10 install disk once again. Open a Command Prompt with Shift + F10 again and browse to C:\Windows\System32, then type these two commands to fix the shortcut you changed:

ren utilman.exe cmd.exe

ren utilman.exe.bak utilman.exe

The Admin account isn’t secure, so you should disable it until you need it later with this command:

net user Administrator /active:no

2. Boot Into a Linux USB and Reset

Keeping Linux around on a USB drive is a great idea. It lets you recover files when Windows won’t boot How to Back Up Data From a Computer That Won't Boot How to Back Up Data From a Computer That Won't Boot When your computer won't boot, your data might still there. Here's how to install Linux on a bootable USB flash drive to recover your files. Next time keep a backup though. Read More , but it comes in handy for resetting passwords, too. If you can’t get into any account on your PC, you can create a Linux drive on another machine and use it to reset your own password.

Boot Into Linux

First, you’ll have to make a bootable Linux USB drive; it doesn’t matter which flavor of Linux you use. Try the process in the file recovery article above to install Mint, or follow our guide to get Ubuntu on a flash drive Install Ubuntu On Your Computer Using a USB Flash Drive Install Ubuntu On Your Computer Using a USB Flash Drive Want to install Ubuntu but don't have a spare blank DVD? Don't worry! After downloadin the ISO file, you can use a highly-reusable USB flash drive to get the job done. Read More .

Once you’ve done that, reboot your PC and look for the prompt to press F12, ESC, Delete, or similar to choose your boot device. Pick your flash drive and give Linux a moment to start up.

Complete any setup tasks like setting the time zone, then open a file explorer.

Mount Your Windows Drive

On Ubuntu, this is the folder icon on the left sidebar. If you’re using Mint, it’s in the bottom-left corner like Windows. Press CTRL + L to edit the Location path, and type this to see all your drives:

computer:///

Find the drive that you have Windows installed on. If you only have one hard drive in your computer, it’s obviously the one present. Right-click on that drive and click Mount so Linux can access it.

Reset the Password

From here, you’re going to work in the Linux Terminal 40+ Most Used Linux Terminal Commands 40+ Most Used Linux Terminal Commands Whether you're just getting started or simply curious about the Linux terminal, here are the most common commands that will carry you through your entire time on Linux. Read More . Don’t worry — it’s not scary! The shortcut to open it in Mint and Ubuntu is CTRL + ALT + T. First, you need to install a password reset utility called chntpw. Type this command to install it:

sudo apt-get install chntpw

Change the working directory (the cd command stands for change directory) to your Windows folder with this line:

cd /mnt/Windows/System32/config

Next, get a list of Windows users by entering this:

sudo chntpw -l SAM
Image Credit: Nehal J Wani via YouTube

You should see the user whose password needs reset in this list. To ensure that you make edits to this user only, type the following command. Replace USER NAME with the user you need to edit. If it’s a one-word username like “Mike”, you don’t need any quotation marks. For multi-word usernames like “Mike Jones,” place quotes around the words or it won’t work.

sudo chntpw -u "USER NAME" SAM

Now, type a 2 to enter editing mode. Type a new password for the user, and hit Enter to submit it. When prompted, enter y to confirm. If you’d like, you can set the password to blank instead of assigning a new one. To do so, type a 1 instead of 2 after you enter the username command and enter y when prompted to save it.

Reboot into Windows and use the new password to sign in! If you set a blank password, open Settings, browse to Accounts > Sign-in options, look under the Password header for a button to change your password.

3. Try the Offline Windows Password & Registry Editor

Tons of Windows software exists to help you reset passwords. One option is the same tool that we detailed in the Linux method above. It gets the job done quickly, so let’s discuss how to use it without Linux. Of course, if you can’t get into your own PC, you’ll have to download the software on a different computer.

Boot Into the Offline Password Editor

Head to the download page and look for the Downloads header. Under it, you’ll see a file with Bootable CD image next to it — named cd140201.zip at the time of writing. Download the ZIP to your desktop or other convenient location and use a file extraction tool How To Extract Files From ZIP, RAR, 7z & Other Common Archives How To Extract Files From ZIP, RAR, 7z & Other Common Archives Were you ever faced with a .rar file and wondered how to open it? Fortunately, managing ZIP files and other compressed archives is simple with the right tools. Here is what you need to know. Read More to get to the ISO inside.

You’ll need to burn this ISO file 10 Tools to Make a Bootable USB from an ISO File 10 Tools to Make a Bootable USB from an ISO File A bootable USB is the best way to install an operating system. Besides the ISO and a USB drive, you need a tool to set it all up. That's where we come in. Read More to a USB drive (or CD if you want) using a free program like Rufus. After it’s done, insert the drive into your PC and reboot. Look for the key to choose a boot device (like F12) if it doesn’t boot to the USB automatically. Once the tool loads, you’ll see a boot: line at the bottom of the terminal output. Press Enter to start.

Plenty of text will scroll by while the tool gets ready. Eventually, it will prompt you to choose the partition that Windows lives on. If you only have one hard drive in your computer, you’ll probably see two options here — don’t pick the one that’s about 100 MB and labeled BOOT. Type the number corresponding to the larger option and then Enter.

Next, you’ll have to confirm that the default path to the Registry (Windows/System32/config) is correct. There’s a 99% chance this is the case, so press Enter to accept that. You’ll see a list of options next. Type the number for the password reset option (usually 1) and press Enter again.

Reset the Password

From here on, the instructions are similar to the Linux process. Press the number 1 to select Edit user data and passwords and Enter to confirm. You’ll see a list of usernames. It will have an account selected by default; type your username instead and hit Enter.

Now you’ll choose what you want to do with this user’s password. You can type 2 to set a new password, or use 1 to make it blank. Press Enter to confirm, and you’ll see a Password cleared! message if you reset it. Type ! and press Enter to leave the user edit screen.

Image Credit: chntpw

You’re almost done! Type q and then Enter to quit the tool. Before it closes, the screen will detail your changes and ask if you want to save them. Type y and press Enter so these changes take effect. You’ll see an Edit Complete message to confirm. Press Enter again to say no when asked if you want to rerun the tool since you’re all done here.

Now you’re done! Remove the disc or USB drive and restart your computer. Boot into Windows as normal and click your username. If you typed a new password, enter it to regain access to your account. If you set it blank, you’ll log right in. Make sure to add a new password so your account is secure! Go to Settings and then Accounts > Sign-in options. Under the Password header, there’s a button to add a password.

Microsoft Accounts, and Future Planning

Note the methods described above work if you’re using a local account on your PC. If you use a Microsoft account to sign in The Pros and Cons of Using a Microsoft Account with Windows The Pros and Cons of Using a Microsoft Account with Windows A single Microsoft Account allows you to log into a wide range of Microsoft services and apps. We show you the pros and cons of using a Microsoft Account with Windows. Read More to Windows 8.1 or Windows 10, though, it’s far easier to reset your password. Visit the Microsoft account password reset page to quickly create a new password via your email.

While you can complete any of these tasks in a short time, there are better ways to avoid getting locked out of your accounts. Consider using a Microsoft account to sign in if you often forget your password. If numbers are easier for you to remember, you can use a PIN to sign in PIN or Password? What to Use in Windows 10 PIN or Password? What to Use in Windows 10 Windows 10 allows you to sign into your PC using several methods. The two most popular are passwords and PINs. Let's examine the differences between them and decide which is best for you. Read More even if you’re on a local account. We also recommend using a password manager How Password Managers Keep Your Passwords Safe How Password Managers Keep Your Passwords Safe Passwords that are hard to crack are also hard to remember. Want to be safe? You need a password manager. Here's how they work and how they keep you safe. Read More so your passwords are just a few clicks away.

Finally, Windows lets you create a password reset disk so you can avoid these lengthy methods in the future. Connect a flash drive and launch the tool by typing password reset disk into the Start Menu. If you get locked out of your account in the future, you can plug in that drive to regain access.

Access Granted

Forgetting your password isn’t fun, and it’s a pain to reset. But at least it’s possible. Anyone can use these methods even if they’re not tech-savvy, and they’re a lot better than reinstalling Windows Why Not to Restore Your Computer to Factory Settings & What to Do Instead Why Not to Restore Your Computer to Factory Settings & What to Do Instead A factory reset restores the bloatware your system originally came with. It weighs down your system and you shouldn't have to put up with that. We show you how to avoid it. Read More because you’re locked out. With a little forward thinking, you can prevent having to do this in the future.

Need to keep others out of your PC once you’ve recovered it? Check out the best methods for locking Windows The 6 Best Methods to Lock Your Windows PC The 6 Best Methods to Lock Your Windows PC Locking your computer is essential in preventing unattended access. Here are several great ways to do so in any version of Windows. Read More .

What’s your worst computer lockout story? Do you prefer another tool or method for resetting passwords? Please share with us in the comments!

Image Credit: Fabrik Bilder via Shutterstock.com

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