3 Great Websites For Beginners to Learn How to Hit a Golf Ball

golfcover   3 Great Websites For Beginners to Learn How to Hit a Golf BallGolf is arguably one of the most “accuracy dependent” sports there are, and technique is extremely vital. Other sports consist of moving your legs, throwing a ball, hitting a ball – things of that nature. In golf, you have a couple of tries to hit a tiny ball into a tiny hole with a tiny stick. It can prove to be extremely frustrating, mainly because there are no redo’s. Usually once you hit a shot, you cannot move the ball unless you incur a penalty. This means that if your golf ball lands on a sleeping alligator, guess what?

Some people say that golf isn’t a real “sport” because it doesn’t involve large, muscular and sweaty men running into each other. Let me just say one thing: golf is both mentally and physically demanding. I have played golf for many years now, and if I hit a 200 yard shot that lands in the woods, I will have to walk 200 yards to reach my golf ball, which by now is probably being gnawed on by some squirrel. For these 200 yards, I will also have to think about how much I regret snapping my wrist while hitting my shot, effectively ruining my score. Even so, playing golf is a very calming experience – it may be a chance for you to reorganize your thoughts in your mind on the quiet golf course, or you may just want to smack something as hard as you can (the driver makes a very satisfying noise when you hit the ball correctly).

Now that everyone is so eager to learn about golf, including some of the basic principles as simple as how to hit a golf ball, here are 3 sites that will definitely help you pick up the game.

Golf.com

Simple site, simple interface, loads of information. One would naturally think that a website with such a demanded URL should have all of the info about golf. Since the main purpose of this article is to inform the masses about where to find tips on how to learn golf, let’s get straight down to business.

Golf.com has a section called “Lesson Finder”:

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Once here, you can click on a variety of different topics to choose from, including “basics”:

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Inside, there is a plentiful selection of videos and articles to learn about how to swing a golf club, get the shot you want, and learn more about the game. These videos and articles are all certified and submitted by GOLF Magazine’s Top 100 golf teachers.

Learnaboutgolf.com

Another great site that offers plenty of tips on how to improve your golf game. At the top of the site, there is a navigation bar. Click “Golf Lessons” to get to this screen:

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There are more than 50 of these articles, but you get the point. Each is a simple article about 1 page in length that provides tips and tricks on how to improve your golfing game. You can also click on the “Video Golf Lessons” link next to the image in the above screenshot, and it will bring you to a new page with a bunch of short video lessons by some guy named Bobby Eldridge:

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Here’s an example of one of his videos in Youtube:

Golf.about.com

Believe it or not, About.com has a very detailed and rich database of beginner golf guides. There are 4 tabs at the top – click on the one labeled “Instruction,” and you will be brought to this page:

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There really isn’t anything else to elaborate on. Any link you click is chock-full of information and tips. There’s also a golf video section, although the number of instructional videos are comparatively smaller than the other sites:

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There are a lot of information floating around the internet on how to play golf or techniques on how to hit a golf ball, but these 3 websites are very concise, organized, and easy to follow; all house some form of video lessons paired with articles and tips. This helps the golfer gain a better understanding about what is trying to be conveyed, both conceptually and visually. The bottom line is that golf is a hands-on sport – you cannot just read about it and learn to play. So grab a set of clubs, any clubs, and get on the green and practice!

P.S. If you are a left-handed golfer, it may be extremely hard to find instructions on how to play left-handed golf. The most consolidated database of videos I have found is located at eHow’s Left Handed Golf Tips: Video Series. Note that a lot of left-handed golfers still play with the same stance and swing as right-handed ones, save for the fact that they grip the clubs and swing a bit differently. This is probably because learning left-handed golf doesn’t really give you an advantage in the sport like it sometimes does (tennis for instance), and it’s really hard to find reverse clubs and an instructor who can teach you to learn opposites.

Even so, there are golfers who play left-handed golf exceptionally well at the higher levels (most notably Phil Mickelson), so if you really feel that you want to play left-handed golf, then by all means, go for it. Utilize symmetries in establishing foundations around your golf game, and the above sites should be able to provide great tips that you can use as well (just flip everything)!

If you haven’t left the house in days and your computer is your sanctuary, then check out Simon’s article on PangYa, an online golf game.

Would you really consider golf a sport? Did you find the resources helpful? Do you have any pro tips for beginner golfers? Shoot away in the comments!

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One Comment -

Chuck

You’re right…while it’s surprising considering their track record and the preponderance of advertising on the site, About.com occasionally does come up with some valuable resources.

Here’s another solid site. No fancy tools…just good basic info on improving your swing:

golfingsecrets.net/