10 Vintage Hard Drive & Memory Ads That Question Value For Money

Today, hard disk space and memory are just two of the many things we take for granted in the world of technology. Computers are fitted with drives that can hold terabytes upon terabytes of data. And we can never get enough memory — why live with just 4 gigabytes of RAM when you can have 32 gigabytes? It didn’t use to be like this though. The following vintage advertisements will make you wonder who on earth would have been able to afford a computer.

This is one of the more recent ads, printed in 1984. 10 megabytes for a special sale price of $945. That’s $94.5 per megabyte if you can’t do the math.

vintage ads

In 1980, a 10 megabyte hard disk would cost $3,495. What a bargain!

vintage ads

A 10 megabyte hard disk from Morrow Designs retailed for $3,695. Want a 26 megabyte hard disk instead? That’ll be $4,995.

vintage hard drive ads

The hard disk you’be been waiting for. Not anymore.

vintage hard drive ads

Here’s a 15 MB hard disk, and at $2,495 it seems like good value too.

vintage hard drive ads

Would you fork out $4,999 for 18 MB?

vintage computer ads

Don’t even bother if you’re not filthy rich. $12K for 80 MB.

vintage computer ads

No idea how much this 80 MB Seagate hard disk cost but it’s a Seagate. So, no thanks.

vintage computer ads

Now, we turn to memory. Would you be able to afford 16 KB of memory for $495? Plus, I didn’t realise memory needed burning in. Interesting.

vintage pc ads

When you have to pay $1,495 for 64 KB of memory, cost effective it is not.

vintage pc ads

Bonus: The industry’s most advanced 100/200 megabyte disk drive. The thing looks like a washing machine.

vintage ads

Ads by Google
Comments (26)
  • Erlis D

    To think how the world of technology has changed for such a short amount of time. Am glad that the prices have gone down so much, even though I would like to gave such an old hard disk… So, my question is: Where can I find one like 10 megabyte hard disk from Morrow Designs, for example? :P

  • Steve M

    These ads seem to bring out the nostalgia in all of us “old” duffers. I remember my first real computer was a PC running at 7Mhz that I overclocked to run at 9Mhz. It had dual 5 1/4″ floppies (that alone took up over 6-INCHES of vertical space in my full sized case). I opted for the latest and greatest of everything including a newly released 1200-baud U.S. Robotics modem, a 10-Meg Winchester hard drive, a top-drawer EGA card/monitor with 16 beautiful (but jaggy) colors, and a full Meg of RAM (supplied by four 256K RAM boards). This beautiful beast ran MS-DOS 2.0 and was so slow I would fire it up in the morning and then go make my coffee, get a Danish, and eat it before the damn thing would finish booting up. I had the ‘puter built by a computer engineer friend at parts cost and it still cost me almost $2600–not counting the $600+ that I spent for a totally cool and cutting edge 18-pin COLOR ALPS dot matrix printer. I’d owned the system for a few months when I saw an ad for a “big-box” computer store’s grand opening special for 1-Meg RAM chips for the low-low-LOW price of just $150 each. My brother and I waited in line for hours for the “privilege” of plunking down $600 bucks for 4 VERY slow Megs of RAM. We each bought the store’s limit of four each.
    I still vividly remember the awe I felt when I ran my first BASIC program on the machine and it ACTUALLY worked!

  • Oscar Aguirre

    My first PC: Columbia Printaform, 128K, 2 floppy drives with 320K, monitor 9 inches, MS-DOS 1.25, Perfect Writer, Perfect Calc, Basic interpreter, Price: $2,995 dlls…

  • null

    Try making a laptop with those hard-drives…..

  • Ashish C

    I still have my 64 Mb pendrove which i bought in the 90’s :D
    Any antique collector ready to buy it ?? :P

Load 10 more
Affiliate Disclamer

This review may contain affiliate links, which pays us a small compensation if you do decide to make a purchase based on our recommendation. Our judgement is in no way biased, and our recommendations are always based on the merits of the items.

For more details, please read our disclosure.
Affiliate Disclamer

This review may contain affiliate links, which pays us a small compensation if you do decide to make a purchase based on our recommendation. Our judgement is in no way biased, and our recommendations are always based on the merits of the items.

For more details, please read our disclosure.