Why do (or don’t) you upgrade to the latest version of software?

Rajaa Chowdhury March 16, 2013
Pinterest Stumbleupon Whatsapp

I usually try to maintain to the latest version of software and OS. The exception was made this time with Windows 7 to 8 and Office 2010 to 2013 upgrade as I realized that my current software are more than sufficing my need. So, this question arose. Do we really always update our OS and application softwares to the latest version as we really driven by the utility of the the latest features, or is it more driven by the fad of the sense of having the latest software? Also is it also the same thought process that drives to purchase the latest hardware, tablets or smartphones. (Kindly remember I am asking it in a situation, where still the older software or platforms are being technically supported).

Ads by Google

  1. Darrin Ford
    March 18, 2013 at 6:49 pm

    It depends on what software it is. I use a music program called Reason and whenever they have an upgrade I usually get it because if they have any improvements, they will give you a free download of the latest version. When it comes to windows, I am still using 7. I will wait a year or so until the kinks are worked out.

  2. maria cater
    March 18, 2013 at 2:37 am

    to avoid the annoy notification.

  3. Junil Maharjan
    March 17, 2013 at 4:28 am

    I like to upgrade my system for better security but mostly to check for new cool features.

  4. Danny Manno
    March 17, 2013 at 3:46 am

    I personally use hardware while it suites my needs. So I upgrade my PC (MB, CPU and RAM) about every 3 years, But my GPU is going on 6 years.
    And as I upgrade my tech travels down the chain and gets put to various uses such as my HTPC and file server.
    My phone is also kept while it suites my needs and while it is fast enough to keep up.
    its a Galaxy S2 running gingerbread because I didn't see the need to go to the latest Android for no real reason and to have to loose RAM and speed to background processes.
    Software such as Windows and Office I try before I upgrade. So on most of my computers I'm running Windows 7 and 2010 Office as I am used to the interface and I don't think i will get any benefit out of an upgrade. I also learn new OS's and maintain compatibility with older ones on Virtual machines.
    I will occasionally upgrade one computer with nothing important on the HDD to the latest OS to see if I like it and then upgrade accordingly.

  5. Jan Fritsch
    March 17, 2013 at 2:54 am

    For the operating system it's usually fine to be one or two versions behind as long as you install all updates and service packs (for security reasons) and can live without using other up-to-date software which may simply require the newer OS.
    For software it mostly depends on what the software does and what has changed. For example I always update my browser(s) updates for security reasons. Messengers like Skype and such usually need to be updated because of changes to the protocol in order to connect to the server. Tools that only run locally e.g. TeraCopy, Renamer tools I usually update 2-3 times a year unless they add restrictions e.g. move from free to paid. Basically everything that has security implications should be updates, everything that changes only in functionality (visible or not) only if you feel necessary or it may solve a problem you have. There isn't really a "safe route" to go other than taking a look at the changelog or release notes and decide whether it is necessary or not.

  6. Monsterigous
    March 16, 2013 at 11:25 pm

    I have "Fences". The upgrade is TERRIBLE. That is one example. I usually avoid upgrades, unless I KNOW for sure that they are good.

    • DalSan M
      March 18, 2013 at 3:16 am

      The Fences application from StarDock is great, but the upgrade is terrible, and is worse because one must pay to use it where previous versions were free to use (and had pay for upgrades). TVersity is another that went from free to a paid application. Even if the support is lost by not upgrading, why change (and pay) for an upgrade when everything works fine? This is where not upgrading/updating is better than to pay for the upgrade/update until it is necessary (as in the applications no longer work).

  7. Réy Aétar
    March 16, 2013 at 5:54 pm

    i dont find the need to upgrade specially in case of paid softwares as long as i get regular updates and my work is done

  8. Manide
    March 16, 2013 at 5:40 pm

    I do upgrade software for security reasons mainly. New features are expected also.

  9. Dhaval Patel
    March 16, 2013 at 3:05 pm

    People are just trying to go with people although they don't know the difference between two different versions so because other do not call them dumb ass. I know many people ( as i am from Mechanical engineering) who are try to install latest version of different CAD modeling software without knowing the difference between old and new version.
    Definitely user interface is always enhanced in new version but it also increasing the size of software and the hunger of resources also. So, if you know the advantages and limitations of each version you can do your work very efficiently with older version using older hardware.

  10. Jim Chambers
    March 16, 2013 at 2:58 pm

    Software company's sometimes force their corporate customers to upgrade by making new version incompatible with previous versions.Thus documents etc. generated by new version can't be accessed with other versions. Since upper management get the new hardware and software first, they are made aware of upgrade requirement firsthand.

  11. Oron Joffe
    March 16, 2013 at 2:57 pm

    People upgrade for different reasons. Some people always like to have the latest ("innovators" in marketing jargon), others like to keep their hardware & software going for as long as possible, and yet others waver between the approaches. Organisations are different again. They tend to be conservative in that moving to a new platform/application is a large and expensive effort, and often creates problems in retaining older software, so they generally try to move as part of a well-planned exercise at predictable times.
    Over the years, I've tried many different approaches myself, both in my own use of technology, with the organisation I worked for (a University) and with private clients. I believe that nowadays the most sensible approach for most people (not everyone) is to buy a piece of equipment which is well specified for the job (for example, in the case of a PC, that is is fast enough and has enough RAM and HD space), and stick with it more -or-less unchanged until there is no longer satisfactory, and then replace the whole system. Thus, I wouldn't generally advise people to upgrade their computers from Windows 7 to 8, but when the time comes to replace the computer, they will obviously get the newer system.
    This still leaves individual software packages/apps and suites like MS Office, of course. Here my regular advice is: keep your computer up to date in terms of patches (security & bug fixes, and even feature releases). Upgrade to a completely new version (e.g. from Office 2010 to 2013) only if the new version has a feature which is truly important to you. The reason I advise against regular full updates is that generally, the cost in money and time to upgrade a package (this is not just the installation, but rather getting used to the new software) often exceeds the benefit.
    All that said, there are many exceptions. Apple make it easy to upgrade by a single full version, but difficult to "leapfrog" a version, so frequent upgrades are better; open source software is updated very often, but usually only incrementally (one could argue that most OSS upgrades are really "patches" as defined above); and there are many other circumstances to consider. In short, pick your policy, but don't be dogmatic!

  12. Bruce Epper
    March 16, 2013 at 1:02 pm

    One should always update if it contains security fixes in order maintain a healthy security posture - and security updates should be free. As far as upgrading software (or hardware for that matter), it all depends on if it is offering something of value to me. If the software has a bunch of new features but I will never have a use for them, why should I drop the cash for the upgrade? It would be offering absolutely no benefit for my dollars. It would be the same as just pulling all of the cash out of my wallet and simply burning it. I'm stupid but not that stupid. The same type of thought proces goes into hardware buying decisions as well. I still have running systems that are using second generation Pentium and Pentium MMX processors.

    With a lot of the software bloat today, I have made the decision that when the commercial software that I am using no longer meets my needs or will no longer be supported by the developer and there is a viable non-commercial solution available, I will be making the switch. I am just so tired of having to buy software that is not an improvement on what I am currently using just because developer support is being dropped. As long as the software is not costing me anything, I will upgrade to currently supported versions even if I won't be using the latest features, but I will no longer do so with commercial packages.

  13. macwitty
    March 16, 2013 at 11:52 am

    No I do not upgrade to latest OS anymore - use to do it. First I ask if I need what it offer, if my other apps will work or how many I have to upgrade. When it comes to update OS and apps I also use to press ok as soon as I was asked but have started to check if people got problem with the update

  14. susendeep dutta
    March 16, 2013 at 10:32 am

    People like to have latest stuffs and features associated with it.They can't resist the urge of getting it.The upgrade or exchange their old stuffs with new ones.

    But in this process,they also lose money.People don't like to be left alone with outdated stuffs.Only few sensible people can stand this force to upgrade.

  15. ha14
    March 16, 2013 at 10:26 am

    if updates close holes in security then it is important to update, next if the new operating system is faster then it is important to update. Office 2007 is still used in companies, schools...some time latest software can have learning stage and the new features if not used then upgrade is not justified.

  16. King Raju
    March 16, 2013 at 9:19 am

    a software application is not a simple program that written by a single programer. it was written by team of programs. hence bugs may contain in that particular program. those are detected later while using that software. in upgrade/update those bugs are rectified and security will be increase. UI also attractive.

  17. Schvenn Meister
    March 16, 2013 at 7:31 am

    New versions of desktop software sometimes limit functionality and add nags/trial features. That's where sites like oldversions.com comes in handy. Even with Android apps, I will keep an old backup, just in case something similar happens with an app I like. That way I can roll back.

  18. Saikat Basu
    March 16, 2013 at 7:24 am

    What we fail to realize is that advertising and the media seduces us into going for the latest. My logic is that if a device is sufficient for my needs today, how can it be inadequate just one year down the road. I can buy into innovation, but it has to be really mind-boggling like the iPhone or iPod was. But very few companies innovate.They simply manufacture.

    If you are really interested in how companies actually play us, I suggest you catch this award-winning documentary - "The Century of The Self".

    Wikipedia Link - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Century_of_the_Self

    To give you an Indian context, when we were young, a Lambretta or Bajaj scooter lasted across two generations. Now, a car doesn't even last 2 years! Because we don't focus on our needs, we focus on desires. And that's what any marketing department wants.

    • Dhaval Patel
      March 16, 2013 at 3:12 pm

      Great.....

    • Alan Wade
      March 16, 2013 at 10:11 pm

      You are spot on Saikat. The advertising brings it into focus, gets us thinking that we must have it and its game over........

  19. 1hegame
    March 16, 2013 at 7:03 am

    I think the most of the people go for latest because it is "latest". I will guess 70% do that. But there are benefits of having latest software. New features is at top.

    In my thinking there is no need to upgrade to the latest if the current is working for you fine. Like I have Windows 7 and I will upgrade only when either the crowd against W8 gets lessened or something really useful come. May be in Windows 9 (though may be in Windows Blue). I'm happy with Windows 7 and even those people having Windows XP really don't need to upgrade because the main difference between all the Windows is there looks and hardly anything else matters. You have no loss in productivity if you're running XP. After April 2014 when XP's support will get ended XP users can think of upgrade.

    IMO if update really brings something big only then one should upgrade. I mostly bypass many updates of my Android apps because they are just minor. Ultimately everything depends on people's tastes. Whether they want productivity or new looks.

  20. Alan Wade
    March 16, 2013 at 7:02 am

    With a operating system such as Windows 8 I usually try it then decide. This time around the upgrade fee was so little that I bought it anyway. After trying it three times and reverting back to Se7en I finally made to jump and deleted my Win 7 images to stop me going back yet again.
    With office 2013, I have tried it but cant honestly say it has anything new to entance me to buy it.
    Other software I always check for new versions and upgrade as necessary.

  21. DalSan M
    March 16, 2013 at 6:28 am

    I believe in utilizing software and hardware until it no longer suits the needs, unless the updates/upgrades are free. Hardware upgrades (hard drive/SSD, RAM, GPU,CPU) can be done for a decent price instead of having to buy a newer system every couple of years. Older systems have their uses as well instead of being the main system (media and file server, retro gaming machine, HTPC). If the upgrade/update is free and none of the usability is lost, I say go for it. When it concerns expensive software like MS Office or operating system, why change when the changes in the newer software may be very different in interface that it may be confusing and slow down your productivity or the features are not necessary. Honestly, I think the major reason for getting the latest and greatest more often than necessary is about the same as vehicles; younger people use it as a status symbol and bragging rights to a point, but as they get older, they realize that there really is not much point to doing so as it wastes money when it isn't necessary (it isn't like the 90's where huge performance differences and features were being made, now it reached a plateau and leveled out with minor performance gains and features).

  22. DalSan M
    March 16, 2013 at 6:28 am

    I believe in utilizing software and hardware until it no longer suits the needs, unless the updates/upgrades are free. Hardware upgrades (hard drive/SSD, RAM, GPU,CPU) can be done for a decent price instead of having to buy a newer system every couple of years. Older systems have their uses as well instead of being the main system (media and file server, retro gaming machine, HTPC). If the upgrade/update is free and none of the usability is lost, I say go for it. When it concerns expensive software like MS Office or operating system, why change when the changes in the newer software may be very different in interface that it may be confusing and slow down your productivity or the features are not necessary. Honestly, I think the major reason for getting the latest and greatest more often than necessary is about the same as vehicles; younger people use it as a status symbol and bragging rights to a point, but as they get older, they realize that there really is not much point to doing so as it wastes money when it isn't necessary (it isn't like the 90's where huge performance differences and features were being made, now it reached a plateau and leveled out with minor performance gains and features).

    • Dhaval Patel
      March 16, 2013 at 3:10 pm

      i am agree with you on last point. as if we see the last 2 or 3 version of any software of any field they have very minor differences. some time even this additional sub-software are created to manipulate the customer that they are providing something new ( but which is unnecessary)

  23. Anish P
    March 16, 2013 at 3:55 am

    People generally wish to have the newest technology so that they have the satisfaction of having the most 'cutting edge' software/hardware. With respect to laptop/desktop OS, I'd recommend sticking with Windows 7 unless your curiosity about Win 8 is so overwhelming that you can't wait to get it. For hardware such as phones, I feel that the 2 year upgrade cycle (at least in the US) somewhat forces/entices users to buy the newer phones. For those with pre-paid or pay as you go plans, i guess it's just a preference. My personal motto for getting new tech - if you have something that does the job and it isn't broken beyond repair, it doesn't need to be replaced

    • James Bogdanski
      March 17, 2013 at 3:21 pm

      I just like the bleeding edge

    • Who
      March 24, 2013 at 6:22 pm

      Windows ? I once tried it, but went quickly back to Mac. It's amazing how something so simple than OS can be ruined to be total mess.

      Human can learn such a lot from own mistakes.

    • Hank Ashkenazi
      April 4, 2013 at 1:43 am

      Sorry for beating around the bush, but unless you have a Touch enabled device, there is no point in even trying out Windows 8.

      Curiosity killed the cat.

Ads by Google