Which router can directly route internet from LAN cable without having to configure net settings?

Dr.Sunil Vaswani June 15, 2013
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Which router can directly route internet from LAN cable without having to configure net settings on the router?

  1. Emmanuel Asuncion
    June 21, 2013 at 12:13 pm

    well i think there is no easy solution you have to do configuration just as stated to the link below http://www.togaware.com/linux/survivor/Router_Router.html

    • Dr.Sunil V
      June 25, 2013 at 5:23 pm

      Thanks

      The link seems to be for linux not for win 7

  2. Emmanuel Asuncion
    June 21, 2013 at 11:16 am

    Can you give the brand and model number of your router (without wifi and the one with wifi).

  3. Oron Joffe
    June 17, 2013 at 10:14 am

    Most broadband routers will work "out of the box" ***IF*** they happen to be set up to the ISP's specs. The problem is that ISPs have different settings, and most require a username/password combination at a bare minimum, so you would have to provide that, at the very least.
    Nevertheless, I have a couple of suggestions. First, is to ask your ISP! Many ISPs (at leat in Britain), will provide a preconfigured router at cost so it is literally a matter of plugging things in, and the ISP will also provide support for them. If this is not an option with your ISP then you could try a Netgear router. In my experience they do a good job of working out most of the ISP settings automatically, and most of the time, all you need to enter are the username and password. Even if not, the user interface is clear so getting things to work is usually quite easy.

    • Dr.Sunil V
      June 20, 2013 at 5:50 pm

      Thanks

      Router is configured and working

      If I connect a wifi router to the configured ( non-wifi ) router then do I have to configure setting on the wifi router or would it work on connecting to the configured router?

    • Oron Joffe
      June 20, 2013 at 7:54 pm

      See ha14's link in his reply above. Note that each router contains a DHCP server, and if you don't configure the two correctly you could get into a complete mess and no connection at all!

    • Dr.Sunil V
      June 22, 2013 at 4:50 am

      Router ( non-wifi ) is http://routerconfigurationindia.blogspot.in/2013/02/mtnlbsnl-sterlite-adsl-router.html is configured and connected to net

  4. dragonmouth
    June 16, 2013 at 3:41 pm

    Those settings are there for a reason, the most important one being Security. If you use the default settings, your LAN is open to all kinds of attacks and misadventures. There are several MUO articles on what, how and why routers need to be configured. Not configuring your router is like leaving the doors and windows to your house not only unlocked but wide open.

    • Dr.Sunil V
      June 20, 2013 at 5:48 pm

      Thanks

      I understand

  5. ha14
    June 16, 2013 at 8:09 am

    Information about the automatic router configuration feature in Windows Home Server
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/944993

    • Dr.Sunil V
      June 20, 2013 at 5:48 pm

      For router to router connection is settings to be configured?

    • ha14
      June 20, 2013 at 6:57 pm

      How to Connect One Router to Another to Expand a Network
      http://www.wikihow.com/Connect-One-Router-to-Another-to-Expand-a-Network
      1) Disable DHCP on the 2nd router
      2) Configure the IP address for Router 2

    • Dr.Sunil V
      June 22, 2013 at 4:50 am

      The net connection is static ip for video surveillance from dvr

    • Dr.sunil V
      July 4, 2013 at 5:49 pm

      Thanks

      Question in connection with topic : is there a device which can easily convert the non-wifi router into wifi access for other wifi devices like mobile phone? Instead of connecting wireless router to wired router?

    • Hovsep A
      July 4, 2013 at 6:43 pm

      you mean to add Wireless Access Point
      http://www.amazon.co.uk/b?ie=UTF8&node=430580031
      You would plug the access point into an existing router or hub or switch. Perhaps you will need also to update your router firmware, but first check if it will work as you want.

      Top 10 Best Wireless Access Points 2013
      http://www.broadbandbuyer.co.uk/Features/Article.asp?TextID=1760

      my guess will be to buy a full router

      Connecting an access point to a wired router
      http://kb.linksys.com/Linksys/ukp.aspx?pid=80&vw=1&articleid=4209

      Connecting an Access Point with a Non-Linksys Wired Router
      http://kb.linksys.com/Linksys/ukp.aspx?pid=80&vw=1&articleid=4181

    • Dr.sunil V
      July 5, 2013 at 5:19 pm

      Thanks

      Is the device plug and play after connecting to wired router?
      Pl note both linksys links return blank with search box

    • Dr.sunil V
      July 9, 2013 at 5:04 pm

      hullo

      can you pl ebay weblink such device to convert wired router into wireless?

  6. Patrick J
    June 16, 2013 at 8:03 am

    Well, surprisingly, almost all of the modern routers advertise 'one-button setup' in order to start using the router as soon as you open them. Although, not all of them stand on their words. I would suggest you to go for any router that you like and go as per their instructions. It may involve installing a software on a PC, which is quite not required.

    Good luck!

  7. Bruce Epper
    June 16, 2013 at 1:06 am

    With most routers on the market designed for a home or small business setting, you normally don't need to mess around with network settings unless the router would be duplicating other services already available on the LAN (DHCP/DNS). The last one I set up had a simple wizard you accessed when first logging in to the router and simply accepted all default settings (DNS & DHCP servers were not already running on the network, so the router needed to handle them, which it did by default). After accepting the default configuration and changing the default password on the router, everything just worked without any hassles. Entire process from unboxing the router, connecting it to the network, updating the firmware and having everything working took less than 10 minutes.

    If you are in a larger environment (mid-size or large business, university campus, or enterprise), you will need to adapt default router settings on the device (and it will be a much larger and more expensive device as well if you want decent performance in those situations).

    • Dr.Sunil V
      June 20, 2013 at 5:47 pm

      Thank y

      Pl note that a router ( without wifi antenna ) is configured on the net connection.

      If I have to connect a wifi router to the non-wifi router then does the wifi router to be configured for settings or would it automatic be configured to act as wifi router once both routers are connected

    • Bruce Epper
      June 21, 2013 at 9:07 pm

      If you already have the device, the easiest way to deal with it would be to keep the default configuration for the currently in-place router (non-WiFi) since it is probably already handling DHCP and DNS for you. When adding the second (WiFi) router, change the settings to turn it into a bridge and turn off DNS and DHCP if they are enabled.

      The default settings will probably cause problems, so doing the above should eliminate all of them without extensive reconfiguration of the devices such as needing to configure DHCP bridging over a routed connection which is a real pain with some devices.

    • Dr.Sunil V
      June 22, 2013 at 4:51 am

      Router ( non-wifi ) is http://routerconfigurationindia.blogspot.in/2013/02/mtnlbsnl-sterlite-adsl-router.html

      Wifi router is to be obtained

      The non wifi router is configured and connected to net.
      A dvr for video surveillance is connected to net with static ip

    • ultimitloozer
      June 23, 2013 at 5:41 am

      In this case, you would simply plug in the wireless router's WAN port to the LAN port on your existing router (misnomer in this case, it is in reality an ADSL modem). Any wired devices on your LAN would be connected to the remaining ethernet ports on the new router.

      Most likely, the dvr already has an address from the 192.168.0.x network. This static IP will need to change since that network is going to become an intermediate network with 2 devices on it: the LAN port of the modem and the WAN port of the wireless router. You will also need to go into the network settings (LAN) of the wireless router and change the IP range of the DHCP server to exclude the IP address that is assigned to the dvr.

      The other things you need to be concerned with are the settings for the wireless network. You may want to change the SSID of the network as well as creating a much stronger password than the default that it ships with. If WEP is enabled and it is not absolutely necessary for the devices you wish to use on it, it should be disabled. The router should default to using WPA2 or WPA2+PSK for security. In most cases you will also want to disable guest access.

      In addition, if the router supports changing the admin username, you should do so and you MUST change the administrative password.

  8. Leland Whitlock
    June 15, 2013 at 11:45 pm

    Any device that has a proper DHCP server can auto configure the network connection and just work. Is that what you want to know? If you are using a static setup this would not work but most routers are setup for DHCP by default. It is mostly plug and play. If you need more details let me know.

    • Dr.Sunil V
      June 20, 2013 at 5:45 pm

      Thank you

      I forgot to mention that a router ( without wifi antenna ) is configured on the net connection

      If I have to connect a wifi router to the non-wifi router then does the wifi router to be configured for settings or would it automatic be configured to act as wifi router once both routers are connected

    • Leland Whitlock
      June 20, 2013 at 7:04 pm

      The non-WiFi router most likely is still setup with DHCP. If not a quick look at the manual should tell you how to turn it on. I would not hook a WiFi router to your non-WiFi router but rather a WiFi access point that could then be configured to use the DHCP server built into the router. However it will have to have a different address than the router. Say the router lives at 192.168.0.1 and the access point at 192.168.0.2; I tend to leave the first ten addresses open for static assignment as needed for when I add new equipment that I don't want to be DHCP. Then anyone connecting to the access point would be using the router to get it's address and connect to the internet. For some basics on networking look at the following. If you need any more clarification let me know. Thanks.

      http://www.makeuseof.com/pages/connected-your-complete-guide-to-home-networking
      http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/local-area-network-wi-fi-wireless,3020.html

    • Dr.Sunil V
      June 22, 2013 at 4:52 am

      Router ( non-wifi ) is http://routerconfigurationindia.blogspot.in/2013/02/mtnlbsnl-sterlite-adsl-router.html

      Wifi router is to be obtained

      the non-wifi router is connected and configured with net.
      A dvr is connected for video surveillance with static ip connection

    • Dr.Sunil V
      June 25, 2013 at 5:20 pm

      Thanks

      Can the same settings of non-wifi router be put in wifi router to enable wifi?

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