What is svchost.exe and why are 9 instances of it running on my system?

March 1, 2014
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My Windows Task Manager states that 9 instances of svchost.exe are running at the same time. Is that normal?

  1. Wayne D
    March 7, 2014 at 3:08 am

    This program was made just for this purpose:

    Tweaking.com - svchost.exe Lookup Tool 1.5.0

    http://www.majorgeeks.com/files/details/tweaking_com_svchost_exe_lookup_tool.html

    • Hovsep A
      March 7, 2014 at 8:00 am

      nice tool:)

  2. Billybob
    March 2, 2014 at 11:08 pm

    My solution to this problem was to start using Linux.

  3. Bob O
    March 2, 2014 at 5:04 pm

    Windows 7 users don't need added programs to view anything.

    http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/list-services-running-under-svchostexe-process/

    This will help you to find out the same info that other programs will do for you.

  4. Itguynb
    March 2, 2014 at 1:50 am

    My neighbor had 29 running at startup consuming resources. It was malware that cloaked itself from most scans. Finally got that and a rootkit cleaned up .

  5. Jan F
    March 1, 2014 at 4:29 pm

    It's basically the short handle for "Service host" as it hosts most of the services running in the background of Windows.
    Another tool would be Svchost Viewer which shows you detailed information (only) about the process.
    http://svchostviewer.codeplex.com/

  6. Hovsep A
    March 1, 2014 at 12:02 pm

    How to determine what services are running under a SVCHOST.EXE process
    http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/list-services-running-under-svchostexe-process/

  7. Oron J
    March 1, 2014 at 11:11 am

    Svchost.exe is a "surrogate" process that makes it easier for Windows programmers to write software which will run in the background. In other words, it "wraps around" the real programmer and runs it in the background. This is a great idea, but it has the downside that it conceals the identity of the real background process in Task Manager.

    It's normal to see multiple instances of it in the the list since the represent, as explained above, different actual programs. If you want to find out what those processes are, download Process Explorer (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896653.aspx) and run it. It will show you a much more accurate picture.

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