Why running Debian on a dual boot computer cause my fan to run longer and louder?

Zhong Jiang October 22, 2012
Pinterest Stumbleupon Whatsapp

Following from my previous adventure of configuring Debian, I’m now faced with a hardware dilemma. The symptoms appeared when I first boot into Debian was the shrilling noise emitting from my laptop vent and it only grows from there. After installing lm-sensors, there was only a pci adapter that shows the temperature and to make this story short, here’s what I did:

root@debian:/home/zhong# modprobe w83627ehf
FATAL: Error inserting w83627ehf (/lib/modules/2.6.32-5-amd64/kernel/drivers/hwmon/w83627ehf.ko): No such device
root@debian:/home/zhong# modprobe w83627ehf force_id=0x8860

This method was a guide from an ubuntu forum: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1933020. However the results differ.

root@debian:/home/zhong# sensors
k10temp-pci-00c3
Adapter: PCI adapter
temp1: +67.5°C (high = +70.0°C, crit = +115.5°C)

w83627ehf-isa-fff8
Adapter: ISA adapter
Vcore: +2.04 V (min = +2.04 V, max = +2.04 V) ALARM
in1: +2.04 V (min = +2.04 V, max = +2.04 V) ALARM
AVCC: +4.08 V (min = +4.08 V, max = +4.08 V) ALARM
VCC: +4.08 V (min = +4.08 V, max = +4.08 V) ALARM
in4: +2.04 V (min = +2.04 V, max = +2.04 V) ALARM
in5: +2.04 V (min = +2.04 V, max = +2.04 V) ALARM
in6: +2.04 V (min = +2.04 V, max = +2.04 V) ALARM
3VSB: +4.08 V (min = +4.08 V, max = +4.08 V) ALARM
Vbat: +4.08 V (min = +4.08 V, max = +4.08 V) ALARM
in9: +2.04 V (min = +2.04 V, max = +2.04 V) ALARM
fan1: 0 RPM (min = 0 RPM, div = 128) ALARM
fan2: 0 RPM (min = 0 RPM, div = 128) ALARM
fan3: 0 RPM (min = 0 RPM, div = 128) ALARM
temp1: -1.0°C (high = -1.0°C, hyst = -1.0°C) ALARM sensor = diode
temp2: +0.0°C (high = +0.0°C, hyst = +0.0°C) ALARM sensor = diode
temp3: +0.0°C (high = +0.0°C, hyst = +0.0°C) ALARM sensor = diode
cpu0_vid: +0.375 V

The new adapter virtually shows no temperature or activity.

root@debian:/home/zhong# sensors-detect
# sensors-detect revision 5818 (2010-01-18 17:22:07 +0100)
# System: Hewlett-Packard HP Pavilion dv6 Notebook PC (laptop)
# Board: Hewlett-Packard 143F

This program will help you determine which kernel modules you need
to load to use lm_sensors most effectively. It is generally safe
and recommended to accept the default answers to all questions,
unless you know what you’re doing.

Some south bridges, CPUs or memory controllers contain embedded sensors.
Do you want to scan for them? This is totally safe. (YES/no): y
Silicon Integrated Systems SIS5595… No
VIA VT82C686 Integrated Sensors… No
VIA VT8231 Integrated Sensors… No
AMD K8 thermal sensors… No
AMD Family 10h thermal sensors… Success!
(driver `k10temp’)
AMD Family 11h thermal sensors… No
Intel Core family thermal sensor… No
Intel Atom thermal sensor… No
Intel AMB FB-DIMM thermal sensor… No
VIA C7 thermal sensor… No
VIA Nano thermal sensor… No

Some Super I/O chips contain embedded sensors. We have to write to
standard I/O ports to probe them. This is usually safe.
Do you want to scan for Super I/O sensors? (YES/no): y
Probing for Super-I/O at 0x2e/0x2f
Trying family `National Semiconductor’… No
Trying family `SMSC’… No
Trying family `VIA/Winbond/Nuvoton/Fintek’… No
Trying family `ITE’… No
Probing for Super-I/O at 0x4e/0x4f
Trying family `National Semiconductor’… No
Trying family `SMSC’… No
Trying family `VIA/Winbond/Nuvoton/Fintek’… No
Trying family `ITE’… No

Some hardware monitoring chips are accessible through the ISA I/O ports.
We have to write to arbitrary I/O ports to probe them. This is usually
safe though. Yes, you do have ISA I/O ports even if you do not have any
ISA slots! Do you want to scan the ISA I/O ports? (YES/no): y
Probing for `National Semiconductor LM78′ at 0x290… No
Probing for `National Semiconductor LM79′ at 0x290… No
Probing for `Winbond W83781D’ at 0x290… No
Probing for `Winbond W83782D’ at 0x290… No

Lastly, we can probe the I2C/SMBus adapters for connected hardware
monitoring devices. This is the most risky part, and while it works
reasonably well on most systems, it has been reported to cause trouble
on some systems.
Do you want to probe the I2C/SMBus adapters now? (YES/no): n
Now follows a summary of the probes I have just done.
Just press ENTER to continue:

Driver `k10temp’ (autoloaded):
* Chip `AMD Family 10h thermal sensors’ (confidence: 9)

No modules to load, skipping modules configuration.

So what could I be doing wrong, have I install the wrong driver for my hardware? The thread has almost an identical problem to mine as well as the detection results.

Ads by Google

  1. Lisa Santika Onggrid
    October 25, 2012 at 12:39 pm

    Some devices don't play nice with Linux. If you've tried what other readers said and the noise can't be gone, face it. You better get another fan. Strangely many fans won't work with Linux.

  2. Mahesh Kay
    October 22, 2012 at 4:54 pm

    Try to reduce the number of applications that are loaded when you boot or login to the desktop. That way you will reduce the burden on the CPU and in turn the fan will be having less noise as well. Just make sure you're not running unnecessary background services and applications.

  3. Boni Oloff
    October 22, 2012 at 10:46 am

    There is no problem with the dual boot, it is because the Debian System you use, maybe you should get more clue in the Debian forum.

  4. Bruce Epper
    October 22, 2012 at 6:06 am

    Your first modprobe failed to load the driver because the device does not exist in your system. Then you forced it to load anyway which led to the long string of ALARM conditions (the device driver is attempting to read data that does not exist because it cannot be pulled from nonexistent hardware). The only thermal sensors you have are from the k10temp device (the AMD temp sensor). This is the only accurate sensor reading you will get since it is the only sensor on the laptop.Your fan is going to be cranking pretty hard for the most part as well because you are approaching the high temp setting so the fan speed will be pretty high. You can try to reduce your CPU load in an attempt to reduce your CPU temp.

    • Zhong Jiang
      October 23, 2012 at 4:10 am

      I haven't install many programs, since this is just a recently installed operating system. When I check the system monitor, cpu usage were only around 2-5%.

  5. Bruce Epper
    October 22, 2012 at 6:05 am

    Your first modprobe failed to load the driver because the device does not exist in your system. Then you forced it to load anyway which led to the long string of ALARM conditions (the device driver is attempting to read data that does not exist because it cannot be pulled from nonexistent hardware). The only thermal sensors you have are from the k10temp device (the AMD temp sensor). This is the only accurate sensor reading you will get since it is the only sensor on the laptop.Your fan is going to be cranking pretty hard for the most part as well because you are approaching the high temp setting so the fan speed will be pretty high.

    • Zhong Jiang
      October 23, 2012 at 4:04 am

      So then there's no method on revealing a detailed description of the fan? After rebooting, the device is gone. But how can I lower it?

Ads by Google