What reference-management software can you recommend?

Ellen O May 5, 2014
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I am a university professor and need to start using a reference management program to organize my references. I could really use some advice as to which program would be the best! I’ve heard of Endnote and RefWorks, and I know there are probably tons of others out there as well. I don’t want to spend a fortune and I think I’d prefer purchasing a program like Endnote to having to pay an annual subscription for RefWorks (unless it has a one-time fee option?) I do not have time to try ten different free trials – I need to just pick a program and get to work using it! So any help would be GREATLY appreciated!

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  1. Hovsep A
    May 5, 2014 at 12:53 pm

    Docear
    http://www.docear.org/2013/10/17/docear-1-0-stable-a-new-video-new-manual-new-homepage-new-details-page/
    A single-section user-interface that differs significantly from the interfaces you know from Zotero, JabRef, Mendeley, Endnote, … and that allows a more comprehensive organization of your electronic literature (PDFs) and the annotations you created (i.e highlighted text, comments, and bookmarks).

    JabRef
    http://jabref.sourceforge.net/

    ReadCube
    http://www.readcube.com/
    Readcube automatically downloads the references and the supporting information documents

    Qiqqa
    http://www.qiqqa.com/
    a citation manager and a mind map brainstorming tool

  2. Oron J
    May 5, 2014 at 10:14 am

    RefWorks is geared towards collaboration and (bibliographic) research, whereas Endnote is much more of a personal bibliography tool, so to a certain degree the answer depends on what you specifically need it for, but you should try Mendeley -- it's a terrific Bibliographic management tool which is open source (it's was designed, if I remember correctly, by a team from Mason University). Apart from the usual "collect, find, format, integrate" features, it has some really nice collaboration featuresand exceptional support for PDFs. For example, it can scan your hard drive for PDFs and catalogue them semi-automatically. It can also back them up to the cloud. It is also free (you get 2GB free cloud storage so if you have more, you'd need to pay for it, but the price is still very reasonable.
    Another popular open source and free product is Zotero, but I prefer Mendeley.