How to best set up Ubuntu 12.10 on my laptop’s SSD?

KamilKozyra April 28, 2013
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How do I tweak Ubuntu 12.10 (32-bit) so it optimizes the performance and life of my SSD? Thanks :)

  1. Maria
    October 22, 2013 at 8:09 am

    From my head now, install preload, change swappiness to 0 if you have enough ram. Load logs to RAM, enable TRIM, use lighter GUI like xfce or lxde.

    You can read more in here http://namhuy.net/1563/how-to-tweak-and-optimize-ssd-for-ubuntu-linux-mint.html

    I followed some from that blog and it helps

  2. KamilKozyra
    April 30, 2013 at 4:03 pm

    Big oops - I meant to say "I'm now using 13.04". Sorry :(

  3. KamilKozyra
    April 29, 2013 at 3:49 pm

    Just an update - I'm not using 13.04. Does it make much of a difference?

    • ha14
      April 30, 2013 at 1:08 pm

      But Ubuntu 12.04 by default still uses the "old" I/O scheduler CFQ, which is only fine for conventional hard disks but not for SSD's, which are being slowed down. So it's wise when you have an SSD in your machine, to change the scheduler in Ubuntu 12.04 to Deadline.

      check here
      Solid State Drive (SSD): optimize it for Ubuntu, Linux Mint and Debian
      https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/ssd
      13. By default, Ubuntu 13.04 uses the I/O scheduler Deadline, which is good for both SSD's and conventional platter hard disks. So for the scheduler, you don't have to change anything in 13.04.

    • Genadi
      July 27, 2013 at 7:40 pm

      This is not quite correct!
      I read the guide, but still decided to check it out.
      Boy, what a surprise!! my 13.04 used CFQ!!!

      I installed Ubuntu 13.04 when it was in Alpha, and probably all the upgrades never changed this.

      I strongly suggest to check and ensure it is either Deadline or NOOP (if no mechanical HDDs in the same computer).

  4. dragonmouth
    April 29, 2013 at 1:06 pm

    SSD drives, unlike mechanical HDs, will allow only a finite number of writes to them. The number may be huge but is finite nevertheless. Therefore, you should put your swap partition and /home partition on a mechanical HD.

  5. ha14
    April 28, 2013 at 8:49 pm

    Solid State Drive (SSD): optimize it for Ubuntu, Linux Mint and Debian
    https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/ssd

    Enable TRIM On SSD (Solid-State Drives) In Ubuntu For Better Performance
    http://www.webupd8.org/2013/01/enable-trim-on-ssd-solid-state-drives.html

    Installing Ubuntu 12.10 on an SSD, Part 3
    http://labnotes.decampo.org/2012/12/installing-ubuntu-1210-on-ssd-part-3.html

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