How can I make different local networks connect via a modem?

Michael Wright March 28, 2013
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I have read numerous responses to network issues for multiple networks on the same router. So here is my issue and question: I have a 192,168.10.1 network using DHCP and wireless through a Linksys Router. I also have a 10.2.1.10 network which we want to add to the same router and allow both Internet access, as well as allow these two networks to talk to each other. So, how how can I make this happen? So far I have had no luck and have had to plug in the two separate networks directly into the modem, and not in the same router.

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  1. Oron Joffe
    March 29, 2013 at 4:29 pm

    You may find this article useful: http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Linking_Routers

  2. prashanth singh rathore
    March 29, 2013 at 12:57 pm

    To reach the settings page of your Modem,enter in the address bar of your browser:
    http://192.168.100.0 OR http://192.168.100.1 (NO www. )
    All modems use one of these two ip's as defaults for the settings pages. You may have to alter your router's settings to allow the router to let you view the modem page, depending on the router mfgr.

    Go: Start - Control Panel. Once control Panel is open, double click on Network Connections. Once the Network Connections window is open, you should see the "Create a New Connection" button on the top left of the window, select it. The "new connection Wizard" will open up, and walk you through creating another Local Area Connection; depending on what you need the second connection for.
    I will warn you however, you cannot "bypass" your hard-wired router if the router is your only incoming connection, unless you have a second NIC card.
    But you can create another connection to the router that will utilize a different port on the router; thus forcing the router to act as a switch; and giving you access to a second ip address.

  3. moe3ius
    March 29, 2013 at 2:18 am

    Exist and old program named Bitnetwork other optioms from same company are bittalk, that its for modems.

    If you talk about routers (cable, DSL) the first option its for you.

  4. Bruce Epper
    March 29, 2013 at 12:32 am

    What does your routing table look line on the Linksys when both networks are connected to it? Is the router handling the DHCP for your 192.168.x.x network? Are you also using DHCP on the 10.x.x.x network? If so, what device is handling it? Does that device know about the Linksys router (is it handing out the proper gateway information to the clients)?