How can I increase the size of image while retaining its clarity?
Question by Dr.sunil V /

How can I increase the size of image while retaining its clarity? Is this possible?

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Answers (13)
  • Jamil A

    There are free softwares available for this.

    • dragonmouth

      “There are free softwares available for this.”
      Would you like to share with us the names of the softwares?

  • Althea Day

    Try Fotosizer. It’s free or very cheap and you can resize photos while still retaining the dpi. You can also increase or decrease the dpi if you wish.

    • Dr.sunil V

      Thanks

      Pl note that it’s webpage mentions of shrinking the size of photos.
      Question is for opposite

  • Oron J

    You can’t retain the clarity of the original image entirely, but you may be able to get a decent result as follows. In Photoshop (or Photoshop Elements), resize the image Using the “Bicubic Smoother” option. This will produce an image with smooth gradients. You can tweak it further. First of all, zoom in to see the enlarged image at 100% (this is important, as the tweaks are done by eye, and you can’t judge them properly otherwise). Then:
    – If the image seems to have lost its “sharpness”, use the Sharpen=>Unsharp mask option (you’ll need to experiment or, better yet, to read up on it to understand how it works). This basically makes the edges of objects stand out better against background or other objects.
    – If the image requires is, and not all do, you can use a noise reduction filter (exact location depends on version of Photoshop) to reduce the noise. Again, you’ll need to read up and/or experiment to learn to use it, but it’s much easier than the unsharp mask.

  • Paul P

    Others can comment on this but if your image is simple enough how about using a conversion program that “traces” the image to a line drawing type file such as SVG which is not limited by pixel size? Here is a free one: https://sourceforge.net/projects/autotrace/

    • Dr.sunil V

      Thank you

      The url mentions it as a program for converting bitmap to vector graphics.
      Does it imply trying to retain clarity while increasing size?

    • Paul P

      Yes. If the conversion is satisfactory (many times it won’t I think but it doesn’t hurt to try), then you can size the vector drawing to any size large or small because the computer know for instance if you are making the image bigger, to lengthen the lines in the right way and continue coloring between the lines as before.

      Perhaps someone else can explain better the difference between bitmaps and vector drawings. See: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dXFCVER_kZI

      SVG is now the web standard for vector drawings. See this interesting comparison of blowing up two images of S’s: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bitmap_VS_SVG.svg

  • Hovsep A

    you can try photoshop, turn off Resample Image in Image Size Dialog Box

    SmillaEnlarger
    http://sourceforge.net/projects/imageenlarger/

    • Dr.sunil V

      Thanks

      I may get back to you on this if further clarification is required for the same

  • Bruce E

    If you are working with bitmapped images, any time you increase the magnification, you will begin getting a blocky looking image. The greater the magnification, the greater the effect. There are algorithms that can be used to attempt to mitigate this pixelation, but they can also distort the image as well. They normally use color comparison between adjacent blocks to try to smooth the “lines” in the image. Even using this technique, you will still be degrading the image.

    In your image editor, you can try to magnify the image in small increments and immediately applying a smoothing filter in an attempt to keep as much clarity as you can. Just repeat the process until your image is the size you desire or the repeated magnification and smoothing process begins to eliminate the details you wish to retain.