Why is my CPU usage 100% when connected to net?
Question by ALBUS /

Every time I connect to the net with a USB modem, my CPU usage spikes up to 100%. I have to manually end a process called PING.EXE from task manager repeatedly to avoid this. Panda and Kaspersky won’t tell what’s wrong. Can anyone, please?

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Answers (5)
  • FIDELIS

    Hello, do you have two antivirus installed? two firewalls?  I your answer is yes to any of the previous questions, make sure to uninstall one of them.  I personally would keep kaspersky…but you are the user so pick one and keep it.  I would recommend running complete scan with antivirus/antimalware.  You could try the following:

    Go to the following site and download Rkill.  Rkill is a tool specifically coded to stop the malware executable files from working.  When you run Rkill and it finishes shutting down the malware files, you can use your computer normally until the next restart.   

    http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/download/anti-virus/rkill

    If you are using a different computer, try to download the iExplore.exe version to a flash drive and run it from there by double clicking on the file.  If you are using the infected computer, downloaded to your desktop.  This version of the program is almost never stopped from running by malware because it imitates the explorer.exe file on your computer.  Once the program is on flash drive, plug your flashdrive and run the program by double clicking on the file.  Let the program do its thing and you will know that it stopped the malware when you see no icons on your desktop and your computer is behaving normally.

    Ok, after you run Rkill, malware will not stop you from downloading antivirus updates or antivirus programs.  Take advantage of this, and go to
    http://www.malwarebytes.org/

    and download the free version to your desktop or a flash drive.  Also go to

    http://www.superantispyware.com/portablescanner.html?tag=SAS_HOMEPAGE

    and download the portable version of the file.  It should have a .com extension.  Malwarebytes and SuperAntiSpyware are two of the best antimalware tools available nowadays and best of all, the free versions are more than enough to fix malware problems.

    Now, in order for you to completely clean your computer, it is better if you disable the system restore and its restore points.  It is important you do this because if not, malware might reinstall next time you restart your computer.  Remember that if you use
    rkill, you will have no icons on your desktop, you will have to use the task manager to access programs.  In order for you to access system restore, follow the next steps:

    — press Ctrl + Alt +Del to launch Task Manager or Ctrl + Shift + Esc
    — on menu, click on File
    — select new Task
    — enter the following command:

              %systemroot%system32restorerstrui.exe

    — click on Ok
    — click on System Restore Settings
    — put a checkmark on Turn off System Restore on all drives
    — click on ok

    When the steps above are done, restart your computer and access safemode.  It would be optimal to select safemode with networking because then you will be able to update your antivirus software and SuperAntiSpyware.  Here is a link explaining different ways of reaching safemode:

    http://bertk.mvps.org/html/safemode.html

    Once you are on safemode with networking you can either, copy the programs you downloaded from your flashdrive to your computer, or run the programs from your flashdrive.  Double click on the SuperAntiSpyware program, select updates, and then run a full scan.   When program is finished scanning delete any entries found and if asked to restart computer, choose no.

    Now, execute the Malwarebytes program, check for updates and run a complete scan.  When scan is finished, delete any entries found.  By now, your computer should be clean or almost clean.  To make sure, update your antivirus if you have one installed, and/or download a antivirus program and run a full scan. 

    After you run all the complete scans for the softwares mentioned above, and your system is reported clean, restart computer on normal mode and to make sure, run complete scans of the two spyware fighting softwares and also a complete scan with your antivirus software.  If nothing is found and system is clean, go back to system restore and enable it.  Make sure that you create a system restore when system is clean. Hope it helps;

     

    • Mike

      Before you start randomly deleting files one has to say that
      C:WindowsSystem32PING.exe is a core system file. 

      If the file is residing outside system32 it is malware and should be removed. If it’s in the specified folder make sure it is digitally signed by Microsoft (right-click > properties > Details) and was not infected by a virus.

      Other then that you can run sfc /scannow via an elevated command prompt and to make sure the system files are all in order.

    • FIDELIS

      Hello, I understand that and as far as I know, I did not ask him to delete ping.exe.  You do admit that this would be the first step to finding out if there is anything not normal residing in his system.  If everything comes up clean, much the better but the only way to find out is by following the steps given.  Also if everything is clean, focus can be shifted somewhere else…..I do not know if he has Panda and Kaspersky installed…that could affect things unless Panda is the online scanner.

    • Mike

      I don’t see your problem with my accompanying comment.

      I simply pointed out to the handful of readers with a PING.exe in their task manager not to start unintentionally deleting system files in their search for a malware which might not be there in the first place.

      For example the USB modem software could use PING to a predefined IP address to calculate the connection speed and in case it’s not up to date or compatible with the installed operating system it could cause a loop resulting in “ping.exe” utilizing most of the system and internet resources.

    • FIDELIS

      Hello, I do not have a problem with your comment.  Actually I welcome any and all comments specially if they complement something I did not explain