How can I resize partitions on a Linux server without data loss or corruption?

February 8, 2014
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I have a Linux Red hat 5 server installed and configured Zimbra open source email. This server was installed and configured before I joined the company. Now, the root partition has only 20% disk space and the rest of the space was set as a partition for /home. The server is running very well and perfect but now root partition has only 10% free space.

Is there any way to move some of space like 100-200 GB back to the root partition without data loss and corruption?

If yes, please provide steps, package name(s) orĀ  names of 3rd party application?

Thanks in advance.

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  1. Mini S
    February 10, 2014 at 7:24 am

    Hi, as what I know that many 3rd party software can resize partition without data loss. MiniTool Partition Wizard is recommended.

    • Abid M
      February 10, 2014 at 4:45 am

      Thanks for your link. It has a enough info to fulfill my question.

      Thanks. :)

      Regards

  2. Oron J
    February 8, 2014 at 11:39 am

    First of all, it should go without saying that you must back up the entire server before starting (imaging it is an obvious way, but you could do this with a file-based backup if you really want to).
    You can then use any of a number of partition managers such as Acronis Disk Director, Paragon Software's Hard Disk Manager, EaseUS Partition Master Server (commercial products, not cheap). Or, you can use GParted, which is part of most (all?) Linux distros. Whichever tool you choose, you would boot from the provided "Live Boot" CD or USB drive, make the changes, then reboot the server normally and if all went well, you would have a working system. If not, you can recover from backup.

    • dragonmouth
      February 9, 2014 at 9:09 pm

      Stand alone GParted can be downloaded from distrowatch.comand sourceforge.com. There are specific versions for amd64 bit, i686 and i486 systems. To manipulate my drives I prefer the stand-alone GParted because it load faster and I don't have to worry about any extraneous apps automatically strting and/or running.

    • Abid M
      February 10, 2014 at 4:44 am

      Thanks a lot for your response and detailed information. Really I appreciate this. I will do the same with LIVE cd.

      Thanks a lot again.
      Regards.

    • Abid M
      February 10, 2014 at 4:49 am

      Thanks a lot for response and detailed information. Now i get a good info to do my task. I will do same with LIVE cd.

      Really I appreciate your response.

      Thanks.

      Regards

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