How to calculate the power supply and check how much I have?

Osama Javaid January 29, 2012
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I have this system configuration:
Intel DH61WW motherboard
Intel Core i3-2100 3.10 GHz
4GB DDR3 RAM
nVidia GT 430 2GB

And I want to install a DVD-Writer, a webcam and a printer in future. How can I know the power supply needed when all of these components are performing at highest possible limit and how can I know how much power supply is installed in my PC now?

  1. tasiere allen
    September 17, 2012 at 5:02 pm

    I don't get it

  2. Anonymous
    January 30, 2012 at 9:52 am

    eXtreme Power Supply Calculator 
    http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculator.jsp

    Journey Systems Power Supply Calculator
    http://www.journeysystems.com/support/calculator/

    Power Supplies: How Much Power Do You Need?
    http://www.pcpower.com/technology/power_usage/

    How Do I Test the Power Supply in My Computer?
    http://pcsupport.about.com/od/toolsofthetrade/f/powersupplytest.htm

  3. FIDELIS
    January 30, 2012 at 7:29 am

    Hello, like previous comment said, it should not affect power too much when you include the hardware you mention.  The webcam will only use the USB power, the printer should not matter and the DVD writer should not be much.  To find out how much power you will need after everything is included you could use a power supply calculator.  Here is the thermaltake power supply calculator.  I already chose some of the numbers you have based in your processor, cpu, graphics card, 1 harddrive and memory.  Also added the one extra USB device.  It says that your system would be using around 277 watts.  Visit the next link, and pick your component or edit the ones I used: 

    http://www.thermaltake.outervision.com/Power

    Here is another power supply calculator:
    http://educations.newegg.com/tool/psucalc/index.html

    To find out the wattage of your current power supply, you could open the tower and see the specs for it on the side.  You could also try checking the manufacturer's site for the specs for your model and brand.  Some times it tells you the wattage there.

  4. M.S. Smith
    January 30, 2012 at 1:02 am

    The bad news is that there's no way to know for sure how much power these components will require. Manufacturers of peripherals normally don't publish that information.

    The good news is that they don't publish that information because it doesn't really matter. All the components you mentioned are going to draw minimal power. And I'd be very surprised if the printer didn't have it own power adapter.

    So this isn't an issue you need be concerned about.